0

The following code was working with EFCore 2.0.

Since the 2.1 update, I get a blocking bug:

The child/dependent side could not be determined for the one-to-one relationship 
between 'Entity2.Main' and 'Entity1.Metadata'. 
To identify the child/dependent side of the relationship, configure the foreign key property. 
If these navigations should not be part of the same relationship configure them without specifying 
the inverse. See http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=724062 for more details.

The tables are something like (they share the same id, but on different tables):

Table_Entity1:
- Id
- Name
- Description

Table_Entity2:
- Id
- Flag1
- Flag2

Entities are like:

public class Entity1
{
    public long Id {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public string Description {get;set;}
    public Entity2 Metadata {get;set;}
}

public class Entity2
{
    public long Id {get;set;}
    public bool Flag1 {get;set;}
    public bool Flag2 {get;set;}
    public Entity1 Main {get;set;}
}

They are declared as follow:

builder.Entity<Entity1>(b =>
{
    b.HasKey(e => e.Id);
    b.Property(e => e.Id).ValueGeneratedNever();
    b.HasOne<Entity2>(e => e.Metadata)
        .WithOne(e => e.Main)
        .HasForeignKey<Entity2>(e => e.Id)
        .HasPrincipalKey<Entity1>(e=>e.Id); 
    b.ToTable("Table_Entity1");
});

builder.Entity<Entity2>(b =>
{
     b.HasKey(e => e.Id);
     b.ToTable("Table_Entity2");
});

How can I solve this? I have tried all HasOne, WithOne, HasForeignKey combinations, nothing seem to work...

1
  • 1
    It works just fine with the provided fluent configuration (as it should). The only way I can get the exception in question is if I don't execute the fluent configuration code.
    – Ivan Stoev
    Jun 15, 2018 at 10:50

2 Answers 2

1

By looking at your models, it seems to me Entity 1 owns Entity 2. Have you followed what's suggested in the Microsoft Document Owned Entity Types section: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/owned-entities?

You can try to change the models to:

public class Entity2
{
    public bool Flag1 { get; set; }
    public bool Flag2 { get; set; }
}

public class Entity1
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public Entity2 Metadata { get; set; }
}

Then on the configurations:

builder.Entity<Entity1>(b =>
{
    b.HasKey(e1 => e1.Id);
    b.OwnsOne(e1 => e1.Metadata, md => {

        // I think the example on the Microsoft Doc is wrong but need to verify.
        // I opened an issue here: 
        //   https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework.Docs/issues/772

        md.ToTable("Table_Entity2");
    });

    b.ToTable("Table_Entity1");
});

Disclaim: I wrote anything by hand hence they're not tested.

3
  • Hi @David, thanks for your answer, that is indeed what I finally got to do, just adding the "OwnsOne" method made it work. I find MS documentation horribly unclear on this feature...
    – Jean
    Jun 14, 2018 at 23:03
  • @Jean: I don't think you should configure them as one-to-one. It looks to me that Entity2 is just the meta data of Entity1. You could have stored them in just one table with one identity since both Ids are the same. Jun 15, 2018 at 0:03
  • 1
    Yes it is metadata, the thing is Entity1 is based on external data, and metadata is the internal analysis of this data. As it is from different sources, and the external source evolves from time to time, I chose to split the table to keep clear about which belongs to which source...
    – Jean
    Jun 15, 2018 at 9:28
1

I have solved it by adding OwnsOne:

builder.Entity<Entity1>(b =>
{
    b.HasKey(e => e.Id);
    b.Property(e => e.Id).ValueGeneratedNever();
    b.OwnsOne<Entity2>(e => e.Metadata);
    b.HasOne<Entity2>(e => e.Metadata)
        .WithOne(e => e.Main)
        .HasForeignKey<Entity2>(e => e.Id);
    b.ToTable("Table_Entity1");
});

builder.Entity<Entity2>(b =>
{
     b.HasKey(e => e.Id);
     b.ToTable("Table_Entity2");
});
2
  • Sorry, but this is a mess. Fortunately EF is smart enough to let the HasOne instruction overrule the OwnsOne instruction, otherwise you'd have an Entity1 table with two additional fields for the owned Entity2 and on top of that an 1:1 association to an Entity2 table having the same fields. You can check it yourself: remove the OwnsOne and everything is the same. You're fixing something that's not broken. The code in your question works, as said before. I suspect you removed an essential part from the real code when you created the sample code. Jun 16, 2018 at 10:37
  • @GertArnold I agree that I doubled the HasOne WithOne that I removed from the answer. However the code in the question doesn't work. It WAS working in with 2.0, but broke when I upgraded to 2.1. I had to add the OwnsOne statement to make it work.
    – Jean
    Jun 19, 2018 at 7:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.