3

I have a survey where some questions were not answered by some participants. Here is a simplified version of my data

df <- data.frame(ID = c(12:16), Q1 = c("a","b","a","a",NA), 
      Q2 = c("a","a",NA,"b",NA), Q3 = c(NA,"a","a","a","b"))
df

I would like to see which ID numbers did not answer which questions. The following code is very close to the output I want but identifies the subject by row number - I would like the subject identified by ID number

table(data.frame(which(is.na(df), arr.ind=TRUE)))

right now the output shows that rows 1,3,5 did not answer at least one question and it identifies the column with the missing value. I would like it show me the same thing but with ID numbers 12,14,16. It would be a bonus if you could have the column names (eg Q1,Q2,Q3) in the output as well instead of column number.

1

In base R:

res <- df[!complete.cases(df),]
res[-1] <- as.numeric(is.na(res[-1]))
res
#    ID Q1 Q2 Q3
# 12 12  0  0  1
# 14 14  0  1  0
# 16 16  1  1  0
  • Thanks, this is exactly what I wanted and is simple enough for me to understand easily. – B.Kenobi Jun 19 '18 at 23:46
4

We can get the column names which are NA row-wise using apply and make it into a comma separated string and attach it to a new dataframe along with it's ID.

new_df <- data.frame(ID =df$ID, ques = apply(df, 1, function(x) 
               paste0(names(which(is.na(x))), collapse = ",")))

new_df

#  ID  ques
#1 12    Q3
#2 13      
#3 14    Q2
#4 15      
#5 16 Q1,Q2

Similar equivalent would be

new_df <- data.frame(ID = df$ID, ques = apply(is.na(df), 1, function(x) 
             paste0(names(which(x)), collapse = ",")))
1

If you wish to avoid apply type operations and continue from which(..., T), you can do something like the following:

tmp <- data.frame(which(is.na(df[, 2:4]), T))
# change to character
tmp[, 2] <- paste0('Q', tmp[, 2])
# gather column numbers together for each row number
tmp_split <- split(tmp[, 2], tmp[, 1])

# preallocate new column in df
df$missing <- vector('list', 5)
df$missing[as.numeric(names(tmp_split))] <- tmp_split

This produces

> df
  ID   Q1   Q2   Q3 missing
1 12    a    a <NA>      Q3
2 13    b    a    a    NULL
3 14    a <NA>    a      Q2
4 15    a    b    a    NULL
5 16 <NA> <NA>    b  Q1, Q2
  • I also really like this answer. I wont use it for my current data set because I have far too many subjects who did answer all questions (and I'm not interested in them at the moment) - but this will definitely come in handy in the future. – B.Kenobi Jun 20 '18 at 2:37
1

You can convert data in long format using tidyr::gather. Filter for Answer not available. Finally, you can summarise your data using toString as:

library(tidyverse)

df %>% gather(Question, Ans, -ID) %>%
  filter(is.na(Ans)) %>%
  group_by(ID) %>%
  summarise(NotAnswered = toString(Question))
# # A tibble: 3 x 2
#      ID NotAnswered
#   <int> <chr>     
# 1    12 Q3        
# 2    14 Q2        
# 3    16 Q1, Q2

If, OP wants to include all IDs in result then, solution can be as:

df %>% gather(Question, Ans, -ID) %>%
  group_by(ID) %>%
  summarise(NoAnswered = toString(Question[is.na(Ans)])) %>%
  as.data.frame()

#   ID NoAnswered
# 1 12         Q3
# 2 13           
# 3 14         Q2
# 4 15           
# 5 16     Q1, Q2
0

How's this with tidyverse:

data:

library(tidyverse)
df <- data.frame(ID = c(12:16), Q1 = c("a","b","a","a",NA), Q2 = c("a","a",NA,"b",NA), Q3 = c(NA,"a","a","a","b"))

code:

x <- df %>% filter(is.na(Q1) | is.na(Q2) | is.na(Q3)) # filter out NAs

y <- cbind(x %>% select(ID),
      x %>% select(Q1, Q2, Q3) %>% sapply(., function(x) ifelse(is.na(x), 1, 0))
) # in 1/0 format

output: x:

  ID   Q1   Q2   Q3
1 12    a    a <NA>
2 14    a <NA>    a
3 16 <NA> <NA>    b

y:

  ID Q1 Q2 Q3
1 12  0  0  1
2 14  0  1  0
3 16  1  1  0
0

My attempt is no better than any already offered, but it's a fun problem, so here's mine. Because why not?:

library( magrittr )

df$ques <- df %>%
    is.na() %>%
    apply( 1, function(x) {
        x %>%
            which() %>%
            names() %>%
            paste0( collapse = "," )
    } )

df

#   ID   Q1   Q2   Q3  ques
# 1 12    a    a <NA>    Q3
# 2 13    b    a    a      
# 3 14    a <NA>    a    Q2
# 4 15    a    b    a      
# 5 16 <NA> <NA>    b Q1,Q2
0

Most of the answer comes from your question:

df[which(is.na(df), arr.ind=TRUE)[,1],]
#     ID   Q1   Q2   Q3
# 5   16 <NA> <NA>    b
# 3   14    a <NA>    a
# 5.1 16 <NA> <NA>    b
# 1   12    a    a <NA>
  • This is basically what I wanted but I'm confused about column 5.1 and why its there – B.Kenobi Jun 19 '18 at 23:37
  • right, the accepted answer is simpler so I'd suggest using that. but the reason for duplicated rows is that which(..., arr.ind=TRUE) returns row and column indexes for every missing value. There are two NA's in row 5, so it is duplicated. You could bypass this using df[unique(which(is.na(df), arr.ind=TRUE=[,1]),] but the accepted asnwer provides a simpler solution. – lebatsnok Jun 20 '18 at 11:58

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