19

The Stream.flatMap() operation transforms a stream of

a, b, c

into a stream that contains zero or more elements for each input element, e.g.

a1, a2, c1, c2, c3

Is there the opposite operations that batches up a few elements into one new one?

  • It is not .reduce(), because this produces only one result
  • It is not collect(), because this only fills a container (afaiu)
  • It is not forEach(), because this has returns just void and works with side effects

Does it exist? can I simulate it in any way?

3
  • What return type are you looking for?
    – SLaks
    Jun 15, 2018 at 13:52
  • Stream<X> goes in, Stream<Y> comes out where Y is some combination of Xes. In principle the whole thing is very similar to collect(), except it would really keep "streaming", not first collecting and then streaming the result: as @Lino's answer.
    – Harald
    Jun 15, 2018 at 14:01
  • 1
    You want Collectors.groupingBy.
    – SLaks
    Jun 15, 2018 at 14:20

7 Answers 7

6

Finally I figured out that flatMap is its own "inverse" so to say. I oversaw that flatMap not necessarily increases the number of elements. It may also decrease the number of elements by emitting an empty stream for some of the elements. To implement a group-by operation, the function called by flatMap needs minimal internal state, namely the most recent element. It either returns an empty stream or, at the end of a group, it returns the reduced-to group representative.

Here is a quick implementation where groupBorder must return true if the two elements passed in do not belong to the same group, i.e. between them is the group border. The combiner is the group function that combines, for example (1,a), (1,a), (1,a) into (3,a), given that your group elements are, tuples (int, string).

public class GroupBy<X> implements Function<X, Stream<X>>{

  private final BiPredicate<X, X> groupBorder;
  private final BinaryOperator<X> combiner;
  private X latest = null;

  public GroupBy(BiPredicate <X, X> groupBorder,
                 BinaryOperator<X> combiner) {
    this.groupBorder = groupBorder;
    this.combiner = combiner;
  }

  @Override
  public Stream<X> apply(X elem) {
    // TODO: add test on end marker as additonal parameter for constructor
    if (elem==null) {
      return latest==null ? Stream.empty() : Stream.of(latest);
    }
    if (latest==null) {
      latest = elem;
      return Stream.empty();
    }
    if (groupBorder.test(latest, elem)) {
      Stream<X> result = Stream.of(latest);
      latest = elem;
      return result;
    }
    latest = combiner.apply(latest,  elem);
    return Stream.empty();
  }
}

There is one caveat though: to ship the last group of the whole stream, an end marker must be stuck as the last element into the stream. The above code assumes it is null, but an additional end-marker-tester could be added.

I could not come up with a solution that does not rely on the end marker.

Further I did not also convert between incoming and outgoing elements. For a unique-operation, this would just work. For a count-operation, a previous step would have to map individual elements to a counting object.

1
  • What is the practical use of this functionality ?
    – armani
    Apr 3, 2020 at 16:29
2

Take a look at collapse in StreamEx

StreamEx.of("a1", "a2", "c1", "c2", "c3").collapse((a, b) -> a.charAt(0) == b.charAt(0))
    .map(e -> e.substring(0, 1)).forEach(System.out::println);

Or my fork with more function: groupBy, split, sliding...

StreamEx.of("a1", "a2", "c1", "c2", "c3").collapse((a, b) -> a.charAt(0) == b.charAt(0))
.map(e -> e.substring(0, 1)).forEach(System.out::println);
// a
// c

StreamEx.of("a1", "a2", "c1", "c2", "c3").splitToList(2).forEach(System.out::println);
// [a1, a2]
// [c1, c2]
// [c3]

StreamEx.of("a1", "a2", "c1", "c2", "c3").groupBy(e -> e.charAt(0))
.forEach(System.out::println);
// a=[a1, a2]
// c=[c1, c2, c3]
3
  • Does the StreamEx groupBy method avoid collecting all elements in memory before grouping them?
    – TheJeff
    Aug 11 at 21:17
  • 1
    It does. you can verify it by adding peek before collapse: stream.peek(System.out::println).collapse(...) Aug 12 at 4:54
  • This helped a lot, added another answer for this based on SteamEx. Appreciate taking the time to add this, best answer here imo - memory efficient, maintained and reusable.
    – TheJeff
    Aug 12 at 13:03
1

You can hack your way around. See the following example:

Stream<List<String>> stream = Stream.of("Cat", "Dog", "Whale", "Mouse")
   .collect(Collectors.collectingAndThen(
       Collectors.partitioningBy(a -> a.length() > 3),
       map -> Stream.of(map.get(true), map.get(false))
    ));
1
  • :-) indeed a hack.
    – Harald
    Jun 15, 2018 at 14:00
1
    IntStream.range(0, 10)
            .mapToObj(n -> IntStream.of(n, n / 2, n / 3))
            .reduce(IntStream.empty(), IntStream::concat)
            .forEach(System.out::println);

As you see elements are mapped to Streams too, and then concatenated into one large stream.

2
  • I might be misunderstanding this or cannot do the transfer, but this seems to assume that I can generate a2, a3 and a4 when I see a1. But this is not the case. Some arbitrary elements come along and I want to batch them up.
    – Harald
    Jun 19, 2018 at 12:53
  • @Harald I understand: editing of a sub-range of several streamed elements, altering the stream. Like data filters in piped I/O / ... . Not something that Stream is good for I think.
    – Joop Eggen
    Jun 19, 2018 at 13:21
0

This is what I came up with:

interface OptionalBinaryOperator<T> extends BiFunction<T, T, Optional<T>> {
  static <T> OptionalBinaryOperator<T> of(BinaryOperator<T> binaryOperator,
          BiPredicate<T, T> biPredicate) {
    return (t1, t2) -> biPredicate.test(t1, t2)
            ? Optional.of(binaryOperator.apply(t1, t2))
            : Optional.empty();
  }
}

class StreamUtils {
  public static <T> Stream<T> reducePartially(Stream<T> stream,
          OptionalBinaryOperator<T> conditionalAccumulator) {
    Stream.Builder<T> builder = Stream.builder();
    stream.reduce((t1, t2) -> conditionalAccumulator.apply(t1, t2).orElseGet(() -> {
      builder.add(t1);
      return t2;
    })).ifPresent(builder::add);
    return builder.build();
  }
}

Unfortunately, I did not have the time to make it lazy, but it can be done by writing a custom Spliterator delegating to stream.spliterator() that would follow the logic above (instead of utilizing stream.reduce(), which is a terminal operation).


PS. I just realized you wanted <T,U> conversion, and I wrote about <T,T> conversion. If you can first map from T to U, and then use the function above, then that's it (even if it's suboptimal).

If it's something more complex, the kind of condition for reducing/merging would need to be defined before proposing an API (e.g. Predicate<T>, BiPredicate<T,T>, BiPredicate<U,T>, or maybe even Predicate<List<T>>).

0

A bit like StreamEx, you could implement the Spliterator manually. For example,

collectByTwos(Stream.of(1, 2, 3, 4), (x, y) -> String.format("%d%d", x, y))

... returns a stream of "12", "34" using the code below:

public static <X,Y> Stream<Y> collectByTwos(Stream<X> inStream, BiFunction<X,X,Y> mapping) {
    Spliterator<X> origSpliterator = inStream.spliterator();
    Iterator<X> origIterator = Spliterators.iterator(origSpliterator);

    boolean isParallel = inStream.isParallel();
    long newSizeEst = (origSpliterator.estimateSize() + 1) / 2;

    Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<Y> lCombinedSpliterator =
            new Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<>(newSizeEst, origSpliterator.characteristics()) {
        @Override
        public boolean tryAdvance(Consumer<? super Y> action) {
            if (! origIterator.hasNext()) {
                return false;
            }
            X lNext1 = origIterator.next();
            if (! origIterator.hasNext()) {
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Trailing elements of the stream would be ignored.");
            }
            X lNext2 = origIterator.next();
            action.accept(mapping.apply(lNext1, lNext2));
            return true;
        }
    };
    return StreamSupport.stream(lCombinedSpliterator, isParallel)
            .onClose(inStream::close);
}

(I think this may likely be incorrect for parallel streams.)

0

Helped mostly by the StreamEx answer above by user_3380739, you can use groupRuns docs here

StreamEx.of("a1", "a2", "c1", "c2", "c3").groupRuns( t, u -> t.charAt(0) == u.charAt(0) )
.forEach(System.out::println);

// a=[a1, a2]
// c=[c1, c2, c3]

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