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At the moment I need to store a single variable in a database. I'm used to storing millions of rows of data to a MySQL database but now I just need to store one variable, a timestamp, that changes every five minutes.

I could create a table that looks something like this:

name                 |  value (timestamp)
-------------------------------------------- 
some_important_time  |  1970-01-01 00:00:01

But then I wondered if I would have more variables like that in the future, maybe not all of them timestamps. Should I then use varchar for the values?

name (varchar)       |  value (varchar)
------------------------------------------- 
some_important_time  |  1970-01-01 00:00:01
------------------------------------------- 
my_integer           |  123

Or should I do something like this:

some_important_time (timestamp)  |  my_integer (int)
---------------------------------------------------- 
1970-01-01 00:00:01              |  123

What do I do if I have 100s of these kinds of variables?

Is there perhaps another way to do this in MySQL than to use tables?

I know I could just go ahead and pick one but I ask because I still have a lot to learn when it comes to MySQL and in the past, I have made assumptions that are making things harder for me now.

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A single variable won't help and doesn't looks like MySQL is a best choice for this. You could use some kind of key/value data store for this purpose which supports very frequent access and change like Redis and you then can store all your this temporary variable as key / value pair and fetch each of them separately and convert them.

Else, if you store them in single variable it would be difficult for you to figure out what's the data type, so that you can do needed conversion

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  • I've never heard about Redis before. What makes that better than using MySQL? I'm already working in MySQL and the timestamp is to check which data the script should fetch to import into a MySQL table. Would you still recommend using Redis? – Andri Jun 15 '18 at 17:42

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