1

I´m new to django

and I want to create models with the following logic:


class ExerciseCardio(models.Model):
    pass


class ExerciseWeights(models.Model):
    pass


class Exercise(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, default='')

    EXERCISE_TYPE_CHOICES = (
        (1, 'cardio'),
        (2, 'Weights'),
    )

    exercise_type = models.PositiveSmallIntegerField(
        choices=EXERCISE_TYPE_CHOICES, default=2)

    if exercise_type == 1:
        exercise_model_type = models.ForeignKey(ExerciseCardio, on_delete=models.CASCADE, default=0)
    elif exercise_type == 2:
        exercise_model_type = models.ForeignKey(ExerciseWeights, on_delete=models.CASCADE, default=0)

    def __str__(self):
        return self.name

I know it looks ugly But there has to be a way to do this

1

Yes, there is a way: you can use djangos generic relations.

The gist of it is like follows:

from django.contrib.contenttypes.fields import GenericForeignKey
from django.contrib.contenttypes.models import ContentType

class Exercise(models.Model):
    EXERCISE_TYPE_CHOICES = (
        (1, 'cardio'),
        (2, 'Weights'),
    )

    name = models.CharField(
        max_length=100, default='')
    exercise_type = models.PositiveSmallIntegerField(
        choices=EXERCISE_TYPE_CHOICES, default=2)
    content_type = models.ForeignKey(ContentType, on_delete=models.CASCADE)
    object_id = models.PositiveIntegerField()
    content_object = GenericForeignKey('content_type', 'object_id')

In your view, when creating the Exercise instance, you would have to select the ContentType of the correct model, maybe like this:

obj = Exercise()
obj.exercise_type = ...
if obj.exercise_type == 1:
    obj.content_type = ContentType.objects.get_for_model(ExerciseCardio)
else:
    obj.content_type = ContentType.objects.get_for_model(ExerciseWeights)
0

Actual generic foreign keys in Django, as you pointed out and Ralf illustrated, are still clunky and ugly.

However, you're talking about a few specific types that need to behave in particular ways, and I think this is a good candidate for inheritance with the help of a custom manager from a library: django-model-utils.managers.InheritanceManager.

models.py:

from django.db import models
from model_utils.managers import InheritanceManager


class Exercise(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=32)

    objects = InheritanceManager()

    def __str__(self):
        return "{n} ({t})".format(n=self.name, t=type(self))


class ExerciseCardio(Exercise):
    pass


class ExerciseWeights(Exercise):
    pass

Example (in Django shell, with my fancy test app, eh):

from eh.models import ExerciseCardio, Exercise, ExerciseWeights


c = ExerciseCardio.objects.create(name="Cardio!")
w = ExerciseWeights.objects.create(name="Weights!")

print(Exercise.objects.filter(name="Cardio!").select_subclasses().get())
# Cardio! (<class 'eh.models.ExerciseCardio'>)

for e in Exercise.objects.all().select_subclasses():
    print(e)
# Cardio! (<class 'eh.models.ExerciseCardio'>)
# Weights! (<class 'eh.models.ExerciseWeights'>)

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