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I wanted to ask for help in interpreting a code in C ++.

#define bit(b) (1 << (b)) // I do not understand the operation.
#define contains(n, b) ((n) & bit(b)) // I do not understand the operation.

 #define MAXV 26

using namespace std;


vector<int> vars;
int deps[MAXV];

string curr;

   void printOrderings(int used, int usedSize) {
  if(usedSize == (int) vars.size()) {
    cout << curr << endl; return;
  }
  for(int i = 0; i < (int) vars.size(); i++) {
    int v = vars[i];
    if(!contains(used, v) && ((used & deps[v]) == deps[v])) {
      curr.push_back(v + 'a');
      printOrderings(used | bit(v), usedSize + 1);
      curr.erase(curr.end() - 1);
    }
  }
}


int main() {
    int tc = 0;
    string line;

    while(getline(cin, line)) {
        if(tc++)
            cout << endl;

        vars.clear();
        for( int i = 0 ; i < (int) line.length() ; i += 2 ) {
            vars.push_back( line[i] - 'a' );
            deps[ line[i] - 'a' ] = 0;
        }
        sort( vars.begin(), vars.end() );

        getline(cin, line);

        for( int i = 0 ; i < (int) line.length() ; i += 4 )
            deps[ line[ i + 2 ] - 'a' ] |= bit( line[ i ] - 'a' ); //I do not understand the operation.

        printOrderings(0, 0);
    }

    return 0;
}

For a problem where the input would be something like:

a b f g

a b b f

v w x y z

v y x v z v w v

I do not understand how Defines works (bit, contains) that use bitwise. And how deps array works.

Can you give me a hand?

The code is a possible solution to the problem: https://uva.onlinejudge.org/external/1/p124.pdf

Thank you.

6
  • The #define macros are macro functions. They are evil, and in C++ there are usually much better alternatives. The first means int bit(int pos) { return 1 << pos; } to return an int with a particular bit set. The second means bool contains(int num, int b) { return n & bit(b); }.
    – Eljay
    Jun 16, 2018 at 22:55
  • contains is not referenced in the sample Jun 16, 2018 at 22:56
  • @IlanKeshet edit post
    – lucy
    Jun 16, 2018 at 22:59
  • @Eljay Not exactly. The bit(b) in here acts like a function returning a char where the bth bit is set - bit(4) would return 0000 1000 assuming a char takes 8 bits. The contains(n,b) in the code above returns an int. Its function is to check whether the bth bit is set in n, returning 0 if the bit is not set and != 0 if the bit is set. Jun 16, 2018 at 23:13
  • 1
    It would be great if the code was compileable... How are vars, deps, curr and the likes declared? Jun 16, 2018 at 23:23

1 Answer 1

0
#define bit(b) (1 << (b))

This will "return" (" because its technically just a macro) a 32-bit integer where only the "b"th bit is 1 while the rest is 0

Imagine a 32-bit number format in binary like this:

0000 0000 0000 0000 (dec 0)

Now what bit(b) really does is shift

0000 0000 0000 0001 (dec 1)

"b" times to the left.

so if we do bit(4) we will get

0000 0000 0001 0000 (dec 16)

#define contains(n, b) ((n) & bit(b)) // I do not understand the operation.

This will, by compiler default return either bit(b) or 0 depending on if n has the "b"th bit from the right switched on. This will mean that if you try contain(15,2), where in binary they look like this

0000 0000 0000 1111 (dec 15) / 0000 0000 0000 0100 (dec 4 - 1 two times shifted to the left)

You can easily do binary operations like &,|,^ (AND, OR, XOR) by writing both numbers below each other, so 15 & 4 in binary would look like this:

0000 0000 0000 1111

0000 0000 0000 0100 &
__________________
0000 0000 0000 0100 (again, dec 4)

If you wonder how defines in C/C++ work they depend on which compiler you use, on Microsoft Visual C++ compilers they get interpreted as just copy pasting the "defined" content into where the macro is used, on linux based compilers they normally do some error checking (and I had my trouble with them on a small level), but work almost similar to the previously mentioned window based one.


Now the "deps" part is tricky since we don't know what this is actually for. You have to describe it a bit more. But using your string "a b f g" on

for( int i = 0 ; i < (int) line.length() ; i += 4 )
    deps[ line[ i + 2 ] - 'a' ] |= bit( line[ i ] - 'a' ); 

will give out these lines

deps[line[0+2]-'a'] |= bit(line[0]-'a']
deps[line[4+2]-'a'] |= bit(line[4]-'a']



deps['b'-'a'] |= bit('a'-'a']
deps['g'-'a'] |= bit('f'-'a']



deps[1] |= bit(0)
deps[6] |= bit(5)


deps[1] |= 1
deps[6] |= 32 //remember 0000 0000 0010 0000

and since all deps[] items have been set to 0 before, in this example all array items are 0 except 1 and 6, which are set to 1 and 32.

|= does nothing else than set the bits that are 1 on the right side also 1 on the left side of the operator

I hope this helped, I seriously see no reason to what this program should do but this should give you an insight of what is actually happening

1

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