-1

I have a variable that can be int or None. If is something else I raise an error.

I have the following code:

if not isinstance(id, int) or id is not None:
    raise AttributeError('must be called with a id of type INT or NONE')

This is not working, because each condition negates the other and will always raise the error.

2
  • 6
    Where's that De Morgan's laws canon when you need it...
    – Aran-Fey
    Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 10:18
  • 1
    here you go: deMorgan Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 10:24

1 Answer 1

17

First of all, you need and instead of or:

if not isinstance(id, (int, )) and id is not None:
    raise AttributeError('must be called with a id of type INT or NONE')

Explanation: you're checking to see if the variable is both not an int and not None, because as you said, checking either one or the other is always True

If you prefer to narrow it down to a single check you can do this:

if not isinstance(id, (int, type(None))):
    raise AttributeError('must be called with a id of type INT or NONE')

Note: you're shadowing the builtin id function with that name, try to use a different one to avoid other weird errors

4
  • 2
    not isinstance(id, (int, )) and id is not None can also be expressed as not (id is None or isinstance(id, int)), which is easier to understand. Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 11:28
  • @brunodesthuilliers that's true, but since the goal is to move to only one not condition I find my way of including both within the same isinstance more readable
    – Ofer Sadan
    Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 11:30
  • I didn't mean your second solution wasn't good in this case, just that as more general solution you can transform not A and not B into not (A or B) (one single negation), which is proven to be easier to understand by an average human brain. Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 11:35
  • agreed, that's true
    – Ofer Sadan
    Commented Jun 17, 2018 at 11:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.