5

Having a static array in a C program:

#define MAXN (1<<13)
void f() {
    static int X[MAXN];
    //...
}

Can the Linux kernel choose to not map the addresses to physical memory until the each page is actually used? How can X be full of 0s then, is the memory zeroed when each page is accessed? How does that not impact the performance of the program?

5
  • 2
    Static memory goes into the .data section, which has its initial contents present in the executable. The loader handles this, not the kernel. Jun 18 '18 at 2:18
  • 2
    It sounds like what you want is mmap with the MAP_ANONYMOUS flag in Linux, which does lazy loading. It may not be 100% portable to the various flavors of Unix, but it does basically what you want. See this Linux memory FAQ for more info, particularly the answer to "What is an anonymous mapping?", and either a Linux mmap man page or the possibly more friendly GNU Libc docs on mmap.
    – user539810
    Jun 18 '18 at 2:29
  • 2
    @ignacio: static variables without an initialiser are required to be zero-initialised. On Unix systems, that is typically accomplished by putting them into the .bss segment, instead of the data segment. The contents of the .bss segment are implicit and therefore not part of the executable. (Only the length is present.)
    – rici
    Jun 18 '18 at 4:42
  • Right, that's what I meant >_> Jun 18 '18 at 5:29
  • If you happen not to access large parts of the array, the performance is affected in a good way.
    – Bo Persson
    Jun 18 '18 at 13:58
6

Can the Linux kernel choose to not map the addresses to physical memory until the each page is actually used?

Yes, it does this for all memory (except special memory used by drivers and the kernel itself).

How can X be full of 0s then, is the memory zeroed when each page is accessed?

You're supposed to ignore this detail. As long as the memory is full of zeroes when you access it, we say it's full of zeroes.

How does that not impact the performance of the program?

It does.

5
  • 3
    "You're supposed to ignore this detail" But that's the interesting part of the question, since the C standard says that all objects with static storage duration must be initialized before main() is called. Other than that, C puts no restrictions.
    – Lundin
    Jun 18 '18 at 6:53
  • 2
    @Lundin: Two words (or 3?): as-if rule. Jun 18 '18 at 7:22
  • @Lundin And initialized means what?
    – user253751
    Jun 19 '18 at 0:20
  • @immibis Set to zero in this case. Suppose for example that I know the whole supposed memory layout of the .bss/.data and therefore decide to access a memory area where a static variable is stored, by doing something like printf("%d", (int*)0x12345678); where 0x12345678 is the address of static int foo;. What will happen then is all implementation-defined and not covered by the C standard. However, since the C standard does guarantee that static variables are initialized before main is called, it makes a whole lot of sense to assume that the above example will print 0.
    – Lundin
    Jun 19 '18 at 6:29
  • All of the static objects will be initialized. We know that has happened because you can read them at any time and read their initial value (or the last written value). Lazy memory allocation doesn't actually enter into it.
    – user253751
    Jun 19 '18 at 10:42
1

Can the Linux kernel choose to not map the addresses to physical memory until the each page is actually used?

Yes, with userspace memory it is always done.

How can X be full of 0s then, is the memory zeroed when each page is accessed?

The kernel maintains a page full of 0s, when the user asks for a new page of the static array (static thus full of 0s before first use), the kernel provides the zeroed page, without permissions for the program to write. Writing to the array causes the copy-on-write mechanism to trigger: a page fault occurs, the kernel then allocates a writable page, maps it and resumes the program from the last instruction (the one that couldn't complete because of the page fault). Note that prezeroing optimizations change the implementation details here, but the theory's the same.

How does that not impact the performance of the program?

The program doesn't have to zero a (potentially) lot of pages on start, and the kernel doesn't actually have to have the memory (one can ask for more memory than the system's got, as long as you don't use it). Page faults will be generated during the execution of the program, but they can be minimized, see mmap() and madvise() with MADV_SEQUENTIAL. Remember that the Translation Lookaside Buffer is not infinite, there are so many entries it can maintain.

Sources: A linux memory FAQ, Introduction to Memory Management in Linux by Alan Ott

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