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I need a good explanation (references are a plus) on Python slicing.

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35 Answers 35

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I don't think that the Python tutorial diagram (cited in various other answers) is good as this suggestion works for positive stride, but does not for a negative stride.

This is the diagram:

 +---+---+---+---+---+---+
 | P | y | t | h | o | n |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+
 0   1   2   3   4   5   6
-6  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1

From the diagram, I expect a[-4,-6,-1] to be yP but it is ty.

>>> a = "Python"
>>> a[2:4:1] # as expected
'th'
>>> a[-4:-6:-1] # off by 1
'ty'

What always work is to think in characters or slots and use indexing as a half-open interval -- right-open if positive stride, left-open if negative stride.

This way, I can think of a[-4:-6:-1] as a(-6,-4] in interval terminology.

 +---+---+---+---+---+---+
 | P | y | t | h | o | n |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+
   0   1   2   3   4   5  
  -6  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1

 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 | P | y | t | h | o | n | P | y | t | h | o | n |
 +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
  -6  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1   0   1   2   3   4   5  
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  • Used today 2021/07/19 by myself, qué capo aguadopd del pasado
    – aguadopd
    Jul 19, 2021 at 21:40
  • As a newbie, this is an interesting way of thinking about it. However, the last example, counting from -6, -5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 is a bit misleading because the string is NOT doubled like that. Furthermore, one can refer to the positive and negate positions like the following: a[-4:-6:-1] is the same as a[-4:0:-1] since the 0th position is the same as the -6th position. So I would just delete/ignore that example. Jan 9 at 5:22
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I got a little frustrated in not finding an online source, or Python documentation that describes precisely what slicing does.

I took Aaron Hall's suggestion, read the relevant parts of the CPython source code, and wrote some Python code that performs slicing similarly to how it's done in CPython. I've tested my code in Python 3 on millions of random tests on integer lists.

You may find the references in my code to the relevant functions in CPython helpful.

def slicer(x, start=None, stop=None, step=None):
    """ Return the result of slicing list x.  

    See the part of list_subscript() in listobject.c that pertains 
    to when the indexing item is a PySliceObject.
    """

    # Handle slicing index values of None, and a step value of 0.
    # See PySlice_Unpack() in sliceobject.c, which
    # extracts start, stop, step from a PySliceObject.
    maxint = 10000000       # A hack to simulate PY_SSIZE_T_MAX
    if step is None:
        step = 1
    elif step == 0:
        raise ValueError('slice step cannot be zero')

    if start is None:
        start = maxint if step < 0 else 0
    if stop is None:
        stop = -maxint if step < 0 else maxint

    # Handle negative slice indexes and bad slice indexes.
    # Compute number of elements in the slice as slice_length.
    # See PySlice_AdjustIndices() in sliceobject.c
    length = len(x)
    slice_length = 0

    if start < 0:
        start += length
        if start < 0:
            start = -1 if step < 0 else 0
    elif start >= length:
        start = length - 1 if step < 0 else length

    if stop < 0:
        stop += length
        if stop < 0:
            stop = -1 if step < 0 else 0
    elif stop > length:
        stop = length - 1 if step < 0 else length

    if step < 0:
        if stop < start:
            slice_length = (start - stop - 1) // (-step) + 1
    else:
        if start < stop:
            slice_length = (stop - start - 1) // step + 1

    # Cases of step = 1 and step != 1 are treated separately
    if slice_length <= 0:
        return []
    elif step == 1:
        # See list_slice() in listobject.c
        result = []
        for i in range(stop - start):
            result.append(x[i+start])
        return result
    else:
        result = []
        cur = start
        for i in range(slice_length):
            result.append(x[cur])
            cur += step
        return result
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  • I read all the relevant documents and found that there was no description of this syntax. I doubted my ability and felt relieved after seeing this answer. Maybe there was none.
    – Andy
    Mar 26, 2021 at 23:22
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It is easy to understand if we could relate slicing to range, which gives the indexes. We can categorize slicing into the following two categories:


1. No step or step > 0. For example, [i:j] or [i:j:k] (k>0)

Suppose the sequence is s=[1,2,3,4,5].

  • if 0<i<len(s) and 0<j<len(s), then [i:j:k] -> range(i,j,k)

For example, [0:3:2] -> range(0,3,2) -> 0, 2

  • if i>len(s) or j>len(s), then i=len(s) or j=len(s)

For example, [0:100:2] -> range(0,len(s),2) -> range(0,5,2) -> 0, 2, 4

  • if i<0 or j<0, then i=max(0,len(s)+i) or j=max(0,len(s)+j)

For example, [0:-3:2] -> range(0,len(s)-3,2) -> range(0,2,2) -> 0

For another example, [0:-1:2] -> range(0,len(s)-1,2) -> range(0,4,2) -> 0, 2

  • if i is not specified, then i=0

For example, [:4:2] -> range(0,4,2) -> range(0,4,2) -> 0, 2

  • if j is not specified, then j=len(s)

For example, [0::2] -> range(0,len(s),2) -> range(0,5,2) -> 0, 2, 4


2. Step < 0. For example, [i:j:k] (k<0)

Suppose the sequence is s=[1,2,3,4,5].

  • if 0<i<len(s) and 0<j<len(s), then [i:j:k] -> range(i,j,k)

For example, [5:0:-2] -> range(5,0,-2) -> 5, 3, 1

  • if i>len(s) or j>len(s), then i=len(s)-1 or j=len(s)-1

For example, [100:0:-2] -> range(len(s)-1,0,-2) -> range(4,0,-2) -> 4, 2

  • if i<0 or j<0, then i=max(-1,len(s)+i) or j=max(-1,len(s)+j)

For example, [-2:-10:-2] -> range(len(s)-2,-1,-2) -> range(3,-1,-2) -> 3, 1

  • if i is not specified, then i=len(s)-1

For example, [:0:-2] -> range(len(s)-1,0,-2) -> range(4,0,-2) -> 4, 2

  • if j is not specified, then j=-1

For example, [2::-2] -> range(2,-1,-2) -> 2, 0

For another example, [::-1] -> range(len(s)-1,-1,-1) -> range(4,-1,-1) -> 4, 3, 2, 1, 0


In summary

enter image description here

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The important idea to remember about indices of a sequence is that

  • nonnegative indices begin at the first item in the sequence;
  • negative indices begin at the last item in the sequence (so only apply to finite sequences).

In other words, negative indices are shifted right by the length of the sequence:

              0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   ...
            -------------------------
            | a | b | c | d | e | f |
            -------------------------
...  -8  -7  -6  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1

With that in mind, subscription and slicing are straightforward.

Subscription

Subscription uses the following syntax:*

sequence[index]

Subscription selects a single item in the sequence at index:

>>> 'abcdef'[0]
'a'
>>> 'abcdef'[-6]
'a'

Subscription raises an IndexError for an index that is out of range:

>>> 'abcdef'[100]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
IndexError: string index out of range

Slicing

Slicing uses the following syntax:**

sequence[start:stop:step]

Slicing selects a range of items in the sequence, beginning at start inclusive and ending at stop exclusive:

>>> 'abcdef'[0:2:1]
'ab'
>>> 'abcdef'[0:-4:1]
'ab'
>>> 'abcdef'[-6:-4:1]
'ab'
>>> 'abcdef'[-6:2:1]
'ab'
>>> 'abcdef'[1:-7:-1]
'ba'
>>> 'abcdef'[-5:-7:-1]
'ba'

Slicing defaults to the fullest range of items in the sequence, so it uses the following default values for any start, stop, or step that is omitted or equal to None:***

  • step defaults to 1;
  • if step is positive
    • start defaults to 0 (first item index),
    • stop defaults to start + len(sequence) (last item index plus one);
  • if step is negative
    • start defaults to -1 (last item index),
    • stop defaults to start - len(sequence) (first item index minus one).
>>> 'abcdef'[0:6:1]
'abcdef'
>>> 'abcdef'[::]
'abcdef'
>>> 'abcdef'[-1:-7:-1]
'fedcba'
>>> 'abcdef'[::-1]
'fedcba'

Slicing raises a ValueError for a step that is equal to zero:

>>> 'abcdef'[::0]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: slice step cannot be zero

Slicing does not raise an IndexError for a start or stop that is out of range (contrary to subscription):

>>> 'abcdef'[-100:100]
'abcdef'

* The expressions sequence[index] and sequence.__getitem__(index) are equivalent.

** The expressions sequence[start:stop:step], sequence[slice(start, stop, step)], and sequence.__getitem__(slice(start, stop, step)) are equivalent, where the built-in class slice instance packs start, stop, and step.

*** The expressions sequence[:], sequence[::], and sequence[None:None:None] use default values for start, stop, and step.

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Lots of answers already, but I wanted to add a performance comparison

~$ python3.8 -m timeit -s 'fun = "this is fun;slicer = slice(0, 3)"' "fun_slice = fun[slicer]" 
10000000 loops, best of 5: 29.8 nsec per loop
~$ python3.8 -m timeit -s 'fun = "this is fun"' "fun_slice = fun[0:3]" 
10000000 loops, best of 5: 37.9 nsec per loop
~$ python3.8 -m timeit -s 'fun = "this is fun"' "fun_slice = fun[slice(0, 3)]" 
5000000 loops, best of 5: 68.7 nsec per loop
~$ python3.8 -m timeit -s 'fun = "this is fun"' "slicer = slice(0, 3)" 
5000000 loops, best of 5: 42.8 nsec per loop

So, if you are using the same slice repeatedly, it would be beneficial and improve readability to use a slice object. However, if you are slicing only a handful of times, [:] notation should be preferred.

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