26

I have a simple class with a property

class Foo 
{ 
    string Title { get; set; } 
}

I am trying to simplify data binding by calling a function like

BindToText(titleTextBox, ()=>foo.Title );

which is declared like

void BindToText<T>(Control control, Expression<Func<T>> property)
{
    var mex = property.Body as MemberExpression;
    string name = mex.Member.Name;

    control.DataBindings.Add("Text", ??? , name);
}

so what do I put in ??? for the instance of my Foo class. How do I get a refernce to the calling foo instance from the lambda expression?

edit: The instance should be there somewhere because I can call property.Compile() and create a delegate that uses the foo instance inside my BindToText function. So my question is if this can be done without adding a reference to the instance in the function parameters. I call upon Occum's Razor to yield the simplest solution.

edit 2: What many have failed to notice is the closure that exists in accessing the instance of foo inside my function, if I compile the lambda. How come the compiler knows where to find the instance, and I don't? I insist that there has to be an answer, without having to pass an extra argument.


Solution

Thanks to VirtualBlackFox the solution is such:

void BindText<T>(TextBoxBase text, Expression<Func<T>> property)
{
    var mex = property.Body as MemberExpression;
    string name = mex.Member.Name;
    var fex = mex.Expression as MemberExpression;
    var cex = fex.Expression as ConstantExpression;            
    var fld = fex.Member as FieldInfo;
    var x = fld.GetValue(cex.Value);
    text.DataBindings.Add("Text", x, name);            
}

which alows me to simply type BindText(titleText, () => foo.Title);.

16

Small LINQPad sample of what you want :

void Foo<T>(Expression<Func<T>> prop)
{
    var propertyGetExpression = prop.Body as MemberExpression;

    // Display the property you are accessing, here "Height"
    propertyGetExpression.Member.Name.Dump();

    // "s" is replaced by a field access on a compiler-generated class from the closure
    var fieldOnClosureExpression = propertyGetExpression.Expression as MemberExpression;

    // Find the compiler-generated class
    var closureClassExpression = fieldOnClosureExpression.Expression as ConstantExpression;
    var closureClassInstance = closureClassExpression.Value;

    // Find the field value, in this case it's a reference to the "s" variable
    var closureFieldInfo = fieldOnClosureExpression.Member as FieldInfo;
    var closureFieldValue = closureFieldInfo.GetValue(closureClassInstance);

    closureFieldValue.Dump();

    // We know that the Expression is a property access so we get the PropertyInfo instance
    // And even access the value (yes compiling the expression would have been simpler :D)
    var propertyInfo = propertyGetExpression.Member as PropertyInfo;
    var propertyValue = propertyInfo.GetValue(closureFieldValue, null);
    propertyValue.Dump();
}

void Main()
{
    string s = "Hello world";
    Foo(() => s.Length);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Some magic LINQPad method, I guess. You can probably just return or print that instead. – hangy Feb 23 '11 at 16:04
  • +1 for getting me closer. Alas, constantInstanceExpression.Value returns the instance of the form, not the field foo in the form. What if there are several classes inside the form that are used for Bindings? I don't want to statically bind to foo, but to whatever is used in the Property. – John Alexiou Feb 23 '11 at 16:21
  • Added everything in the sample that you could want :D Even interpreting the expression manually to get the field value :D – Julien Roncaglia Feb 23 '11 at 16:48
  • [v/] Thats it!. Now I have a simple way to do DataBinding... awesome – John Alexiou Feb 23 '11 at 18:34
4

Don't. Just modify the method to take another parameter, as described in #3444294. For your example, it may be something like this:

void BindToText<T>(Control control, T dataSource, Expression<Func<T>> property)
{
    var mex = property.Body as MemberExpression;
    string name = mex.Member.Name;

    control.DataBindings.Add("Text", dataSource, name);
}

and would be called like

BindToText(titleTextBox, foo, ()=>foo.Title );

Still nice, but easy to understand. There's no magic happening. ;)

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks but I want to avoid doing so. Look at my edit above, and see that there should be a way to get to it, I just don't know how. – John Alexiou Feb 23 '11 at 14:59
2

Something like the following should work:

void BindToText<T>(Control control, Expression<Func<T>> property)
{
    var mex = property.Body as MemberExpression;
    string name = mex.Member.Name;

    var fooMember = mex.Expression as MemberExpression;
    var fooConstant = fooMember.Expression as ConstantExpression;
    var foo = fooConstant.Value;

    control.DataBindings.Add("Text", foo, name);
}

Let me know if that doesn't work for you.

| improve this answer | |
  • Ooops, just realized that this is, more or less, the same answer as VisualBlackFox's... – Charles Feb 23 '11 at 16:35
1

Well, this is similar in tone to Hangy's solution, but is I think rather comfortable to use and does not require much magic:

public static Binding CreateTextBinding<T>(this T source, Expression<Func<T,object>> access)
{
    var mex = access.Body as MemberExpression;
    string name = mex.Member.Name;
    return new Binding("Text", source, name);
}

This is basically an extension method that can be called on any object acting as source. It gives you back a Binding for a Text property which you can add to any Bindings collection.

| improve this answer | |

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