80
public class A 
{    
    private static final int x;

    public A() 
    {
        x = 5;
    }
}
  • final means the variable can only be assigned once (in the constructor).
  • static means it's a class instance.

I can't see why this is prohibited. Where do those keywords interfere with each other?

175

A constructor will be called each time an instance of the class is created. Thus, the above code means that the value of x will be re-initialized each time an instance is created. But because the variable is declared final (and static), you can only do this

class A {    
    private static final int x;

    static {
        x = 5;
    }
}

But, if you remove static, you are allowed to do this:

class A {    
    private final int x;

    public A() {
        x = 5;
    }
}

OR this:

class A {    
    private final int x;

    {
        x = 5;
    }
}
  • 17
    Apparently nobody bothered to explain that static variables are variables that exist in all instances of a class. As such, they can only be instantiated once, when the class is loaded - not when potentially many instances of the class are constructed. – iheanyi Aug 26 '14 at 14:59
  • 1
    Also, I would recommend just assigning in the declaration rather than in a static block. It's just cleaner and probably is what the OP wanted to do: private static final int x = 5; – qwertzguy Jul 13 '16 at 21:52
  • What if you want to pass the value "5" from another component/class, instead of having it hardcoded? – user1156544 Apr 4 at 14:50
16

static final variables are initialized when the class is loaded. The constructor may be called much later, or not at all. Also, the constructor will be called multiple times (with each new object ), so the field could no longer be final.

If you need custom logic to initialize your static final field, put that in a static block

  • Ok, but you just explained what is happening. I am asking why ? I mean, without the final it works, without the static it works. so combining the both creates some new logic ? – Yaron Levi Feb 23 '11 at 16:33
  • 3
    @YaronLevi he just said it... the static field is a member of the class itself. In your constructor you are assigning a value to the variable. The word final means you can only assign a value to the variable ONE time, in your code you are assigning a value to the variable every time the class is instantiated - because the variable is static (a member of the class). If you get rid of static, then you can assign it a value in the constructor since its a new variable each time. If you get rid of final then it is just a static variable, which you can assign a new value to at any time. – user12345613 Feb 22 '12 at 23:45
  • 1
    @user12345613 put up a pretty good explanation. Alone, either final or static work; but once put together, "static final" forces there is only one such field for that class across all instances and can only be initialized once regardless how many instances. – user908645 Mar 30 '16 at 22:35
6

Think about what happens the second time you instantiate an object. It tries to set it AGAIN, which is expressly prohibited by being a static final. It can only be set one time for the entire class, not instance.

You should set the value when you declare it

private static final x=5;

If you need additional logic, or more complex instantiation, this can be done in a static initializer block.

5

static means that the variable is unique on the application. final means that it should be set only once.

If you set it in your constructor, you allow to set the variable more than once.

Hence you should intialize it directly or propose a static method to initialize it.

3

Final doesn't mean that is has to be initialized in the constructor. Generally this is what is done :

 private static final int x = 5;

static instead means that the variable will be shared through multiple instances of the class. For example :

public class Car {
   static String name;
   public Car(String name) {
      this.name = name;
   }
}

...

Car a = new Car("Volkswagen");
System.out.println(a.name); // Produces Volkswagen

Car b = new Car("Mercedes");
System.out.println(b.name); // Produces Mercedes
System.out.println(a.name); // Produces Mercedes
2

Think about it. You could do this with your code:

A a = new A();
A b = new A(); // Wrong... x is already initialised

The correct ways to initialise x are:

public class A 
{    
    private static final int x = 5;
}

or

public class A 
{    
    private static final int x;

    static
    {
        x = 5;
    }
}
0
    public class StaticFinalExample {
  /*
   * Static final fields should be initialized either in
   * static blocks or at the time of declaration only
   * Reason : They variables are like the utility fields which should be accessible
   * before object creation only once.
   */
  static final int x;

  /*
   * Final variables shuould be initialized either at the time of declaration or
   * in initialization block or constructor only as they are not accessible in static block
   */
  final int y;

  /*
   * Static variables can be initialized either at the time of declaration or
   * in initialization or constructor or static block. Since the default value is given to the
   * static variables by compiler, so it depends on when you need the value
   * depending on that you can initialize the variable appropriately
   * An example of this is shown below in the main method
   */
  static int z;

  static {
    x = 20; // Correct
  }
  {
    y = 40; // Correct
  }
  StaticFinalExample() {
    z = 50; // Correct
  }
  public static void main (String args[]) {
    System.out.println("Before Initialization in Constructor" + z);   // It will print 0
    System.out.println("After Initializtion in Constructor" + new StaticFinalExample().z); // It will print 50
  }
}

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