3

I'm writing Rust code for WebAssembly to handle strings from JavaScript land.

Since WebAssembly has no real string type, I'm trying to pass a pointer to WebAssembly memory object which points to UTF-8 encoded string.

#[no_mangle]
pub extern "C" fn check(ptr: *mut u8, length: u32) -> u32 {
    unsafe {
        let buf: &[u8] = std::slice::from_raw_parts(ptr, length as usize);
        // do some operations on buf
        0
    }
}

It works fine, expect that I have to depend on the std crate, which bloats the final binary to about 600KB.

Is there any way to get rid of std::slice::from_raw_parts but still be able to cast a raw pointer to a slice?

8
  • @Boiethios Yeah, I'm aware of that. The last return statement was appended temporarily but forgot to strip return. Thanks. – liuyanghejerry Jun 20 '18 at 6:27
  • which bloats the final binary — this sounds like a toolchain problem. Are you running wasm-gc? – Shepmaster Jun 20 '18 at 12:58
  • @Shepmaster wasm-gc is helpful. It will shrink the binary down to about 248KB. But without std crate, the binary size can be shrink to 18KB, which contains ~17KB data and only ~1KB code. – liuyanghejerry Jun 21 '18 at 11:12
  • The thing is, the ultimate amount of code that you use from libcore is the exact same that you use from libstd. std::slice::from_raw_parts_mut is core::slice::from_raw_parts_mut. Switching from one to the other shouldn't change anything. It really sounds like some piece of unused code or data isn't being properly removed. – Shepmaster Jun 21 '18 at 21:52
  • @Shepmaster In fact, in order to get rid of std, I also add "#![no_std]" and its counterparts. Those code made a lot difference on the final binary. – liuyanghejerry Jun 26 '18 at 12:52
4

You cannot cast a raw pointer to a slice because in Rust, a slice is not a mere pointer, it is a pointer and a size (otherwise it could not be safe).

If you do not want to use std, you can use the core crate:

extern crate core;

#[no_mangle]
pub extern "C" fn check(ptr: *mut u8, length: u32) -> u32 {
    unsafe {
        let buf: &mut [u8] = core::slice::from_raw_parts_mut(ptr, length as usize);
    }
    // do some operations on buf
    0
}

The core crate is the part of the std crate suitable for embedded, i.e. without all the stuff that needs some allocation.

4

It is possible to manually construct something similar to a slice, which is a fat pointer that consists of a thin pointer and a length. Then cast a pointer-to-this-construct to a pointer-to-slice.

This approach is not only unsafe, it also relies on Rust internals (memory layout of a slice) that are not guaranteed to remain stable between compiler version, or even systems I suppose. @Boiethios' answer is the way to go if you want to be sure that your code works correctly in the future. However, for educational purposes, the code below may still be interesting:

unsafe fn make_slice<'a>(ptr: *const u8, len: usize) -> &'a [u8] {
    // place pointer address and length in contiguous memory
    let x: [usize; 2] = [ptr as usize, len];

    // cast pointer to array as pointer to slice
    let slice_ptr = &x as * const _ as *const &[u8];

    // dereference pointer to slice, so we get a slice
    *slice_ptr
}

fn main() {
    let src: Vec<u8> = vec![1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];
    let raw_ptr = &src[1] as *const u8;

    unsafe {
        println!("{:?}", make_slice(raw_ptr, 3));  // [2, 3, 4]
    }
}

(tested on playground with Rust Stable 1.26.2)

2
  • This is very interesting. Is there any document or origin of this approach that I can track later? – liuyanghejerry Jun 20 '18 at 7:50
  • 1
    @liuyanghejerry The memory layout of slices is loosely described in the book (figure 4-6). Knowing that, the rest is just pointer mangling to reinterpret the meaning of stuff in memory. – kazemakase Jun 20 '18 at 8:03

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