8

Approximate entropy was introduced to quantify the the amount of regularity and the unpredictability of fluctuations in a time series.

The function

approx_entropy(ts, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(ts), elag = 1)

from package pracma, calculates the approximate entropy of time series ts.

I have a matrix of time series (one series per row) mat and I would estimate the approximate entropy for each of them, storing the results in a vector. For example:

library(pracma)

N<-nrow(mat)
r<-matrix(0, nrow = N, ncol = 1)
for (i in 1:N){
     r[i]<-approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
}

However, if N is large this code could be too slow. Suggestions to speed it? Thanks!

3
+50

I would also say parallelization, as apply-functions apparently didn't bring any optimization.

I tried the approx_entropy() function with:

  • apply
  • lapply
  • ParApply
  • foreach (from @Mankind_008)
  • a combination of data.table and ParApply

The ParApply seems to be slightly more efficient than the other 2 parallel functions.

As I didn't get the same timings as @Mankind_008 I checked them with microbenchmark. Those were the results for 10 runs:

Unit: seconds
expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
forloop     4.067308 4.073604 4.117732 4.097188 4.141059 4.244261    10   b
apply       4.054737 4.092990 4.147449 4.139112 4.188664 4.246629    10   b
lapply      4.060242 4.068953 4.229806 4.105213 4.198261 4.873245    10   b
par         2.384788 2.397440 2.646881 2.456174 2.558573 4.134668    10   a 
parApply    2.289028 2.300088 2.371244 2.347408 2.369721 2.675570    10   a 
DT_parApply 2.294298 2.322774 2.387722 2.354507 2.466575 2.515141    10   a

Different Methods


Full Code:

library(pracma)
library(foreach)
library(parallel)
library(doParallel)


# dummy random time series data
ts <- rnorm(56)
mat <- matrix(rep(ts,100), nrow = 100, ncol = 100)
r <- matrix(0, nrow = nrow(mat), ncol = 1)      


## For Loop
for (i in 1:nrow(mat)){     
  r[i]<-approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
}

## Apply
r1 = apply(mat, 1, FUN = function(x) approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1))

## Lapply
r2 = lapply(1:nrow(mat), FUN = function(x) approx_entropy(mat[x,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[x,]), elag = 1))

## ParApply
cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
  library(pracma); 
  approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
})
stopCluster(cl)

## Foreach
registerDoParallel(cl = 3, cores = 2)  
r4 <- foreach(i = 1:nrow(mat), .combine = rbind)  %dopar%  
  pracma::approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
stopImplicitCluster()  

## Data.table
library(data.table)
mDT = as.data.table(mat)
cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
r5 = parApply(cl = cl, mDT, 1, FUN = function(x) {
  library(pracma); 
  approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
})
stopCluster(cl)


## All equal Tests
all.equal(as.numeric(r), r1)
all.equal(r1, as.numeric(do.call(rbind, r2)))
all.equal(r1, r3)
all.equal(r1, as.numeric(r4))
all.equal(r1, r5)


## Benchmark
library(microbenchmark)
mc <- microbenchmark(times=10,
  forloop = {
    for (i in 1:nrow(mat)){
      r[i]<-approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
    }
  },
  apply = {
    r1 = apply(mat, 1, FUN = function(x) approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1))
  },
  lapply = {
    r1 = lapply(1:nrow(mat), FUN = function(x) approx_entropy(mat[x,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[x,]), elag = 1))
  },
  par = {
    registerDoParallel(cl = 3, cores = 2)  
    r_par <- foreach(i = 1:nrow(mat), .combine = rbind)  %dopar%  
      pracma::approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
    stopImplicitCluster()
  }, 
  parApply = {
    cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
    r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
      library(pracma); 
      approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
    })
    stopCluster(cl)
  },
  DT_parApply = {
    mDT = as.data.table(mat)
    cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
    r5 = parApply(cl = cl, mDT, 1, FUN = function(x) {
      library(pracma); 
      approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
    })
    stopCluster(cl)
  }
)

## Results
mc
Unit: seconds
expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
forloop 4.067308 4.073604 4.117732 4.097188 4.141059 4.244261    10   b
apply 4.054737 4.092990 4.147449 4.139112 4.188664 4.246629    10   b
lapply 4.060242 4.068953 4.229806 4.105213 4.198261 4.873245    10   b
par 2.384788 2.397440 2.646881 2.456174 2.558573 4.134668    10  a 
parApply 2.289028 2.300088 2.371244 2.347408 2.369721 2.675570    10  a 
DT_parApply 2.294298 2.322774 2.387722 2.354507 2.466575 2.515141    10  a 

## Time-Boxplot
plot(mc)

The amount of cores will also affect speed, and more is not always faster, as at some point, the overhead that is sent to all workers eats away some of the gained performance. I benchmarked the ParApply function with 2 to 7 cores, and on my machine, running the function with 3 / 4 cores seems to be the best choice, althouth the deviation is not that big.

mc
Unit: seconds
expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval  cld
parApply_2 2.670257 2.688115 2.699522 2.694527 2.714293 2.740149    10   c 
parApply_3 2.312629 2.366021 2.411022 2.399599 2.464568 2.535220    10 a   
parApply_4 2.358165 2.405190 2.444848 2.433657 2.485083 2.568679    10 a   
parApply_5 2.504144 2.523215 2.546810 2.536405 2.558630 2.646244    10  b  
parApply_6 2.687758 2.725502 2.761400 2.747263 2.766318 2.969402    10   c 
parApply_7 2.906236 2.912945 2.948692 2.919704 2.988599 3.053362    10    d

Amount of Cores

Full Code:

## Benchmark N-Cores
library(microbenchmark)
mc <- microbenchmark(times=10,
                     parApply_2 = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 2))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     },
                     parApply_3 = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     },
                     parApply_4 = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 4))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     },
                     parApply_5 = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 5))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     },
                     parApply_6 = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 6))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     },
                     parApply_7 = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 7))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     }
)

## Results
mc
Unit: seconds
expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval  cld
parApply_2 2.670257 2.688115 2.699522 2.694527 2.714293 2.740149    10   c 
parApply_3 2.312629 2.366021 2.411022 2.399599 2.464568 2.535220    10 a   
parApply_4 2.358165 2.405190 2.444848 2.433657 2.485083 2.568679    10 a   
parApply_5 2.504144 2.523215 2.546810 2.536405 2.558630 2.646244    10  b  
parApply_6 2.687758 2.725502 2.761400 2.747263 2.766318 2.969402    10   c 
parApply_7 2.906236 2.912945 2.948692 2.919704 2.988599 3.053362    10    d

## Plot Results
plot(mc)

As the matrices get bigger, using ParApply with data.table seems to be faster than using matrices. The following example used a matrix with 500*500 elements resulting in those timings (only for 2 runs):

Unit: seconds
expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
ParApply 191.5861 191.5861 192.6157 192.6157 193.6453 193.6453     2   a
DT_ParAp 135.0570 135.0570 163.4055 163.4055 191.7541 191.7541     2   a

The minimum is considerably lower, although the maximum is almost the same which is also nicely illustrated in that boxplot: enter image description here

Full Code:

# dummy random time series data
ts <- rnorm(500)
# mat <- matrix(rep(ts,100), nrow = 100, ncol = 100)
mat = matrix(rep(ts,500), nrow = 500, ncol = 500, byrow = T)
r <- matrix(0, nrow = nrow(mat), ncol = 1)      

## Benchmark
library(microbenchmark)
mc <- microbenchmark(times=2,
                     ParApply = {
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
                       r3 = parApply(cl = cl, mat, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     },
                     DT_ParAp = {
                       mDT = as.data.table(mat)
                       cl <- makeCluster(getOption("cl.cores", 3))
                       r5 = parApply(cl = cl, mDT, 1, FUN = function(x) {
                         library(pracma); 
                         approx_entropy(x, edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(x), elag = 1)
                       })
                       stopCluster(cl)
                     }
)

## Results
mc
Unit: seconds
expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
ParApply 191.5861 191.5861 192.6157 192.6157 193.6453 193.6453     2   a
DT_ParAp 135.0570 135.0570 163.4055 163.4055 191.7541 191.7541     2   a

## Plot
plot(mc)
2

Parallelization would speed things up.

Current System Time: without parallelization

library(pracma)

ts <- rnorm(10000)                                       # dummy random time series data

mat <- matrix(ts, nrow = 100, ncol = 100)
r <- matrix(0, nrow = nrow(mat), ncol = 1)               # to collect response


system.time ( for (i in 1:nrow(mat)){                    # system time:  for loop
      r[i]<-approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
                        } ) 

 user  system elapsed 
31.17    6.28   65.09  

New System Time: with parallelization

Using foreach and its back-end parallelization package doParallel to control resources.

library(foreach)
library(doParallel)

registerDoParallel(cl = 3, cores = 2)                      # initiate resources

system.time (
       r_par <- foreach(i = 1:nrow(mat), .combine = rbind)  %dopar%  
                pracma::approx_entropy(mat[i,], edim = 2, r = 0.2*sd(mat[i,]), elag = 1)
            )

stopImplicitCluster()                                      # terminate resources

user  system elapsed 
0.13    0.03   29.88

P.S. I would recommend setting up the cluster, core allocations as per your configuration and speed requirements.

Also the reason I didn't include the comparison with apply family is because of their sequential nature in implementation, that would produce only a marginal improvement. For a considerable improvement in speed, shifting from a sequential to parallelized implementation is recommended.

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