52

I'm learning SQL and what bothers me, is that I seem unable to find ALL constraints on a table. I created the table with

create table t2
(a integer not null primary key,
b integer not null, constraint c1 check(b>0),
constraint fk1 foreign key(a) references t1(a));

and added a constraint with

alter table t2
add constraint c2 check (b<20);

I then tried to see ALL (four) constraints with

show table status
from tenn #-->the name of my database
like 't2';

and then

show create table t2;

and then

select *
from information_schema.key_column_usage
where table_name='t2';

and finally

select *
from information_schema.table_constraints
where table_name='t2';

But none of these shows all four constraints. Could anyone tell me how to see all of them?

Thanks a lot!

4
  • 1
    Could you please specify what is a result of the queries you run? * P.S What I've heard is that mysql does not support check constraints.
    – user194076
    Feb 23, 2011 at 18:09
  • Though have you tried CONSTRAINT_COLUMN_USAGE?
    – user194076
    Feb 23, 2011 at 18:10
  • You can try to query system tables directly, not Information Schema views
    – user194076
    Feb 23, 2011 at 18:12
  • Possible duplicate - stackoverflow.com/questions/3024981/… Feb 20, 2018 at 0:05

7 Answers 7

64
select COLUMN_NAME, CONSTRAINT_NAME, REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME, REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME
from information_schema.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE
where TABLE_NAME = 'table to be checked';
1
  • 4
    As of March 2020, this query does not show any CHECK constraints that the table may have.
    – tronman
    Mar 9, 2020 at 19:16
36

The simplest way to see the explanation of a current table and its constraints is to use:

SHOW CREATE TABLE mytable;

This will show you exactly what SQL would be entered to define the table structure in its current form.

14

You can use this:

select
    table_name,column_name,referenced_table_name,referenced_column_name
from
    information_schema.key_column_usage
where
    referenced_table_name is not null
    and table_schema = 'my_database' 
    and table_name = 'my_table'

Or for better formatted output use this:

select
    concat(table_name, '.', column_name) as 'foreign key',  
    concat(referenced_table_name, '.', referenced_column_name) as 'references'
from
    information_schema.key_column_usage
where
    referenced_table_name is not null
    and table_schema = 'my_database' 
    and table_name = 'my_table'
2
  • Is there anyway to display all database names in the table as well?
    – Dexter
    Apr 25, 2018 at 13:46
  • 1
    Yes, also project table_schema Apr 28, 2018 at 13:39
12

You could get it from information_schema.table_constraints like this :

SELECT * 
FROM   information_schema.table_constraints
WHERE  table_schema = schema()
AND    table_name = 'table_name';
0
3

The foreign key constraints are listed in the Comment column of the output from the following command:

 SHOW TABLE STATUS FROM db_name LIKE 'tbl_name';
1
  • This has not worked for me (mysql 5.5.35-0ubuntu0.12.04.2): the comments field is blank, whereas R R Madhav's solution shows constraints returned as columns.
    – msanford
    Jul 11, 2014 at 20:24
1

Unfortunately MySQL does not support SQL check constraints. When you define them in your query they are just ignored.

2
  • 4
    You may want to delete your answer since CHECK constraints are now supported.
    – tronman
    Mar 9, 2020 at 19:12
  • * as of MySql 8
    – SuperDJ
    Dec 2, 2021 at 9:45
0

Export the database table in SQL.

If you have phpmyadmin, you can do so by visiting the "Export" tab. If you choose the "Custom" export method, be sure to select either "structure" or "structure and data" under the "Format-specific options" section.

Sample .sql export snippet:

--
-- Table structure for table `customers`
--    

CREATE TABLE `customers` (
  `username` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `fullname` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  `postalcode` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`username`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
...

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