-2

Edited in simple words

code:

class temp:
    attr1 = 0
    attr2 = []

t1 = temp()
t2 = temp()
t1.attr1 = 50
t1.attr2.append(50)
print(t1.attr1)
print(t1.attr2)
print(t2.attr1)
print(t2.attr2)

output:

50
[50]
0
[50]

I have called append only on attr2 object t1 but the append changes attr2 of both objects. if attr2 is shared (class attributes) then why does attr1 values are different for t1 and t2. What might have caused this unexpected behaviour ?

old question

I am writing a python code for blackjack. The code I have written is as follows.

from random import randint
from IPython.display import clear_output

deck = ["S","D","C","H"]
class Player:
    cards = []
    total = 0
    amount = 0

    def __init__(self,money=0):
        self.amount = money

    def busted(self):
        return self.total > 21

    def showCards(self):
        for i in self.cards:
            print("| {}{} |".format(i%13,deck[i//13]),end = " ")
        print()

    def hit(self):
        no = randint(1,53)
        self.cards.append(no)
        if no % 13 == 1:
            if self.total + 11 > 21:
                self.total+=1
            else:
                self.total+=11
        else:
            self.total += (no%13 if no%13 <= 10 else 10)


dealer = Player(10000)
p1 = Player(0)
print("Welcome to BlackJack ....")
while True:
    try:
        p1.amount = int(input("Enter the amount you currrently have for the game"))
    except:
        print("invalid Value")
        continue
    else:
        break
Game = True

while Game:
    print(dealer.cards)
    print(p1.cards)
    dealer.hit()
    print(dealer.cards)
    print(p1.cards)
    print(dealer.total)
    print(p1.total)
    Game = False

output of this code is as follows

Welcome to BlackJack ....
Enter the amount you currrently have for the game55
[]
[]
[45]
[45]
6
0

as you can see I had called hit() only once on dealer object but it is appending it to cards attribute of both dealer as well as p1 object. However total attribute is different. Can anyone explain what might have caused this unexpected behaviour ?

  • instead of cards, try self.cards – Venkata Gogu Jun 20 '18 at 15:02
  • exactly where definition? – Ani Jun 20 '18 at 15:03
  • in __init__(), add self.cards = [] – Venkata Gogu Jun 20 '18 at 15:04
  • yes it does the trick. But it doesn't explain why total is different but cards is the same – Ani Jun 20 '18 at 15:06
  • You are adding to only one player ie., dealer.hit() adds amount to dealer instance not for the player instance. – Venkata Gogu Jun 20 '18 at 15:10
1

When you do t1.attr1 = 50, you're rebinding attr1 to a new value in the t1 object's attribute namespace. It previously let you access the value bound in the class namespace, but when you bind a new value, you hide the one from the class (for that instance only).

In contrast, when you do t1.attr2.append(50), you're mutating the existing list (which is bound in the class namespace, but is visible though all instances) in place, with no rebinding of variables happening at all. This is why you see the change in t2. The variables t1.attr2 and t2.attr2 are both references to the same object (which you can verify using the is operator: t1.attr2 is t2.attr2).

In general, it's usually not a good idea to use lists or other mutable values for class variables if you don't want them to be shared by all instances. It's not forbidden though, because sometimes you do specifically do want the shared behavior.

  • Thank you... Your answer cleared a lot of concepts... Can you explain what rebinding is ? it sounds like it copies class attributes to object attributes. – Ani Jun 21 '18 at 7:24
  • 1
    Rebinding is just another way of saying "reassign". Names in Python are a little different than variables in other languages, so it's sometimes useful to use a different word. This article is a really good one for understanding Python's way of doing things. The added complexity you encountered here is that class attributes are visible in their instances, but if you assign back to the attribute (with an actual assignment, e.g. foo.attr = whatever), you set an instance attribute that shadows the class attribute. – Blckknght Jun 21 '18 at 18:45
1

I got what you are asking. You need to differentiate all cards with player cards. So, instead of naming everything as cards, I would suggest doing this:

class Player:
    all_cards = []
    total = 0
    amount = 0

and update __init__ as :

def __init__(self, money=0):
    self.amount = money
    self.player_cards = []

while doing append operation, append it to all_cards and to the player_cards. Anyway, you are printing only player cards, you can see different list of cards.

Here is full code :

from random import randint
from IPython.display import clear_output

deck = ["S","D","C","H"]
class Player:
    all_cards = []
    total = 0
    amount = 0

    def __init__(self,money=0):
        self.player_cards = []
        self.amount = money

    def busted(self):
        return self.total > 21

    def showCards(self):
        for i in self.player_cards:
            print("| {}{} |".format(i%13,deck[i//13]),end = " ")
        print()

    def hit(self):
        no = randint(1,53)
        self.player_cards.append(no)
        self.all_cards.append(no)
        if no % 13 == 1:
            if self.total + 11 > 21:
                self.total+=1
            else:
                self.total+=11
        else:
            self.total += (no%13 if no%13 <= 10 else 10)


dealer = Player(10000)
p1 = Player(0)
print("Welcome to BlackJack ....")
while True:
    try:
        p1.amount = int(input("Enter the amount you currrently have for the game"))
    except:
        print("invalid Value")
        continue
    else:
        break
Game = True

while Game:
    print(dealer.player_cards)
    print(p1.player_cards)
    dealer.hit()
    print(dealer.player_cards)
    print(p1.player_cards)
    print(dealer.total)
    print(p1.total)
    Game = False

This happened because list is a mutable object, and it is created once only when defining the class, that is why it becomes shared when you create two instances. Therefore, to solve this problem, we can use constructor like what I have mentioned above. When we put the list in constructor, whenever the object is instantiated, the new list will also be created.

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