20

I've written a predicate, shuffle/3, which generates "shuffles" of two lists. When the second and third argument are instantiated, the first argument becomes a list which has all the elements of both Left and Right, in the same order that they appear in Left and Right.

For example:

?- shuffle(X, [1, 2], [3, 4]).
X = [1, 3, 2, 4] ;
X = [1, 3, 4, 2] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 4] ;
X = [3, 4, 1, 2] ;
X = [3, 1, 2, 4] ;
X = [3, 1, 4, 2] ;
false.

Here's the code I've come up with to implement it:

shuffle([], [], []).
shuffle([H|R], [H|Left], Right) :- shuffle(R, Right, Left).
shuffle([H|R], Left, [H|Right]) :- shuffle(R, Right, Left).

This works well, and even generates reasonable results for "the most general query", but it fails to be deterministic for any query, even one where all arguments are fully instantiated: shuffle([1, 2, 3, 4], [1, 2], [3, 4]).

My real question is: is there anything I can do, while maintaining purity (so, no cuts), which makes this predicate deterministic when all arguments are fully instantiated?

And while I'm here, I'm new to Prolog, I wonder if anyone has advice on why I would care about determinism. Is it important for real prolog programs?

4
  • 1
    Spurious choice-points can cause severe performance issues in complex applications due to excessive and time consuming backtracking exploring paths that lead to dead ends or to alternative solutions that are either duplicated or irrelevant for the application. – Paulo Moura Jun 21 '18 at 8:03
  • What do you mean by "deterministic"? It seems to me that the results are completely deterministic. You'd get exactly the same results from run to run. – Enigmativity Jun 21 '18 at 10:17
  • I think it's more important to document and understand whether they are deterministic or have multiple solutions, and that it arise logically from the situation. You can make things with multiple solutions only have one, using cuts or once/1 but this usually trips up backwards-correctness. I would find it odd if shuffle/3 was deterministic (i.e. single solution) in the usual pattern shuffle(-Out, +Left, +Right), but if I needed it to seem random and produce a single solution, I would build a predicate just for that and document it as such. – Daniel Lyons Jun 21 '18 at 14:19
  • 1
    Note there are several senses of determinism in play here. In a documenting Prolog sense, a predicate is deterministic if it has one solution always, where a predicate that can have no solution or just one is semi-deterministic, or if there is no way to know how many solutions there may be, we would say it is "multi". In a narrower sense, as PauloMoura says, you don't want to produce a spurious choice point if you can avoid it. And in CS generally, determinism has the meaning Enigmativity is alluding to, that there are no hidden variables. – Daniel Lyons Jun 21 '18 at 14:23
11

No, there is no way to make this predicate deterministic while still maintaining pure code. To see this, consider:

?- shuffle([1, 1], [1], [1]).
      true
   ;  true.

There are two answers to this. Why? The best is not to use a debugger to understand this, but rather to use a generalized query:

?- shuffle([X1, X2], [Y1], [Y2]).
      X1 = Y1, X2 = Y2
   ;  X1 = Y2, X2 = Y1.

So here you can see the "true" connection between the arguments! And now our specific query is an instance of this more general query. Thus, no way to remove the two answers.

However, you might use cut in a pure way, provided it is guarded such that the result will always be pure. Like testing ground(shuffe(Xs, Ys, Zs)) but all of this is quite ad hoc.


On second thought, there might be a pure, determinate answer, but only if the answers to shuffle([X1, X2], [Y1], [Y2]). are changed somehow. The answer actually should be:

?- shuffledet([X1, X2], [Y1], [Y2]).
      X1 = X2, X2 = Y1, Y1 = Y2      % all equal
   ;  dif(X1, X2), X1 = Y1, X2 = Y2
   ;  dif(X1, X2), X1 = Y2, X2 = Y1.

So that might be a possibility... I will had put a 500 bounty on this ASAP, but no response. And again I try another one.

1
  • I've love to know how to implement the bottom answer, it's possible to just emit constraints like that? – num1 Jun 22 '18 at 0:05
5
+500

The way to make the more det version of shuffle is using if_/3 from library module reif:

shuffle_det1( A,B,C):-
  if_( B=[], A=C,
   if_( C=[], A=B, 
        ( B=[BH|BT], C=[CH|CT], A=[AH|AT], (
                 AH=BH, shuffle_det1( AT, BT, C)
                 ;
                 AH=CH, shuffle_det1( AT, B, CT) ) ))).

Working positionally, it's OK, and indeed eliminates some (most?) spurious choice points:

40 ?- shuffle_det1(X, [1, 2], [3, 4]).
X = [1, 2, 3, 4] ;
X = [1, 3, 2, 4] ;
X = [1, 3, 4, 2] ;
X = [3, 1, 2, 4] ;
X = [3, 1, 4, 2] ;
X = [3, 4, 1, 2].

41 ?- shuffle_det1(X, [11,12], [11,22]).
X = [11, 12, 11, 22] ;
X = [11, 11, 12, 22] ;
X = [11, 11, 22, 12] ;
X = [11, 11, 12, 22] ;
X = [11, 11, 22, 12] ;
X = [11, 22, 11, 12].

81 ?- shuffle_det1([1,2,3,4], [3, 4], [1, 2]).
true.

But:

82 ?- shuffle_det1([1,2,3,4], [1, 2], [3, 4]).
true ;
false.

Also, as [user:false] points out, if two lists' head elements are equal, there's some redundancy in the answers:

  11 12 13 ..       B
  21 22 23 ..       C

  11 (12.. + 21..)        |    21 (11.. + 22..)
      12 (13.. + 21..)             11 (12.. + 22..) *
    | 21 (12.. + 22..) *         | 22 (11.. + 23..)

Here the two cases marked with * actually conflate when 11 == 21. To combat that, we "unroll" the picking by doing two in a row in such cases:

shuffle_det( A,B,C):-
  if_( B=[], A=C,
   if_( C=[], A=B, 
        ( B=[BH|BT], C=[CH|CT], A=[AH|AT],
          if_( \X^(dif(BH,CH),X=true ; BH=CH,X=false),
               (
                 AH=BH, shuffle_det( AT, BT, C)
                 ;
                 AH=CH, shuffle_det( AT, B, CT) ),
               (
                 AH=BH, AT=[CH|A2], shuffle_det( A2, BT, CT)     % **
                 ;
                 pull_twice( A,B,C)
                 ;
                 pull_twice( A,C,B)
                ))))).

pull_twice([BH|AT],[BH|BT],C):- % B,C guaranteed to be non-empty
    if_( BT=[], AT=C,
         ( BT=[BH2|B2], AT=[BH2|A2], shuffle_det(A2,B2,C) )).

Testing:

35 ?- shuffle_det(A, [11,12], [11,22]).
A = [11, 11, 12, 22] ;
A = [11, 11, 22, 12] ;
A = [11, 12, 11, 22] ;
A = [11, 22, 11, 12].

This is already much better than shuffle_det1. But it's not fully right yet:

38 ?- shuffle_det(A, [1], [1]).
A = [1, 1] ;
A = [1, 1] ;
A = [1, 1].

The two pull_twice calls are probably the culprit. Somehow there must be only one, which would decide whether to do the other one or not...

4
  • so basically, this is an "I tried, but couldn't" answer. – Will Ness Jan 17 '19 at 10:09
  • yes, I couldn't quite figure out what to do with it. If I switch to if_ there too, then it works better for some queries, but for others it skips valid answers... maybe I'll get it later, if I work on it some more... thanks for the challenge, and for the bounty! – Will Ness Jan 17 '19 at 19:18
  • For one, if_( \X^(dif(BH,CH),X=true ; BH=CH,X=false), cannot make sense, because BH, CH are used before. So you get here some random copies ... And then why at all? Why not if_(dif(BH,CH), ? – false Jan 21 '19 at 11:51
  • thanks, dif works. unfortunately it didn't change the outcome for the problematic queries. I had an idea on switching on "the two heads can't possibly unify" but couldn't makeit work either. – Will Ness Jan 22 '19 at 9:48
-1

I only want to remark that OPs shuffle/3 is a strange shuffle:

shuffle([], [], []).
shuffle([H|R], [H|Left], Right) :- shuffle(R, Right, Left).
shuffle([H|R], Left, [H|Right]) :- shuffle(R, Right, Left).

The shuffle from the logic programming wiki page is rather, moveing the last argument to the front. So Left and Right are not switched in the tail:

shuffle([], [], []).
shuffle([First | ShortMerge], [First | Rest], Right) :-
    shuffle(ShortMerge, Rest, Right).
shuffle( [First | ShortMerge], Left, [First | Rest]) :-
    shuffle(ShortMerge, Left, Rest).

I dont know whether it really matters, but just for the record.

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