1

Consider the following C code.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
  int test = 0;
  int a= 10,b = 20;
  test ? a*2 : b*3;
  printf("a = %d, b = %d\n",(test ? a = 200 : b = 300),(test ? a =2 : b = 3));

  return 0;
}

When trying to compile it throws the following error.

file1.c:11:50: error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment
printf("a = %d, b = %d\n",(test ? a = 200 : b = 300),(test ? a =2 : b = 3));
                                              ^
file1.c:11:74: error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment
printf("a = %d, b = %d\n",(test ? a = 200 : b = 300),(test ? a =2 : b = 3));
                                                                      ^

I have already provided an l value as left operand for the assignment operations and besides why does it not throw an error in the line

test ? a*2 : b*3;

and it produces error only in the line

printf("a = %d, b = %d\n",(test ? a = 200 : b = 300),(test ? a =2 : b = 3));

Please explain.

  • provide a variable to the statement test ? a*2 : b*3 like result= test ? a*2 : b*3 – Ac3_DeXt3R Jun 21 '18 at 5:15
  • Please provide the expectation of your problem statement. It is not much clear what you want. – Ac3_DeXt3R Jun 21 '18 at 5:21
  • @Ac3_DeXt3R: That statement was merely to show it didn't throw any compile error. – TARS Jun 21 '18 at 5:37
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Errors using ternary operator in c – Bo Persson Jun 21 '18 at 11:43
2

You're probably missing parenthesis and the compiler thinks you mean:

(test ? a = 200 : b) = 300

when you actually meant:

test ? (a = 200) : (b = 300)

  • The reason is : assignment has a lower precedence than the ternary operator – Soumen Jun 21 '18 at 5:21
  • @StoryTeller This discussion is being discussed on Meta. – André Kool Jun 21 '18 at 17:46
2

The ternary operator(?:) has higher precedence(not strictly) as compared to assignment(=). So, putting assignment statement inside round brackets can have more precedence as shown:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
  int test = 0, ret;
  int a= 10,b = 20;
  test ? a*2 : b*3;
  printf("a = %d, b = %d\n",(test ? (a = 200) : (b = 300)), (test ? (a =2) : (b = 3)));

  return 0;
}

Strictly speaking, it's not the matter of Operator precedence, but of language grammar.

According to C Operator Precedence:

The C language standard doesn't specify operator precedence. It specifies the language grammar, and the precedence table is derived from it to simplify understanding. There is a part of the grammar that cannot be represented by a precedence table: an assignment-expression is not allowed as the right hand operand of a conditional operator, so e = a < d ? a++ : a = d is an expression that cannot be parsed, and therefore relative precedence of conditional and assignment operators cannot be described easily.

However, many C compilers use non-standard expression grammar where ?: is designated higher precedence than =, which parses that expression as e = ( ((a < d) ? (a++) : a) = d ), which then fails to compile due to semantic constraints: ?: is never lvalue and = requires a modifiable lvalue on the left. This is the table presented on this page.

  • Precedence is a consequence of the grammar. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 21 '18 at 19:27
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit, yes, can be said in a nutshell! – Ac3_DeXt3R Jun 22 '18 at 3:54

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