7

I am using spring-boot to develop backend services. There is a scenario to compare 2-beans(one is the DB object and another one is the client requested object) and return the "new element","modified element" and if there is no change then return false. The 2-beans are in a below format

"sampleList":{
     "timeStamp":"Thu, 21 Jun 2018 07:57:00 +0000",
     "id":"5b19441ac9e77c000189b991",
     "sampleListTypeId":"type001",
     "friendlyName":"sample",
     "contacts":[
        {
           "id":"5b05329cc9e77c000189b950",
           "priorityOrder":1,
           "name":"sample1",
           "relation":"Friend",
           "sampleInfo":{
              "countryCode":"91",
              "numberType":"MOBILE",
              "numberRegion":"IN"
           }
        },
        {
           "id":"5b05329cc9e77c000189b950",
           "priorityOrder":1,
           "name":"sample2",
           "relation":"Friend",
           "sampleInfo":{
              "countryCode":"91",
              "numberType":"MOBILE",
              "numberRegion":"IN"
           }
        }
     ]
  }

I have browsed internet about bean comparison for this scenario in java but I couldn't find any simpler solution but found some cool solution for JSON. I can see some solution for GSON but it will not return the client object contains "new element" and the "changes element". Is there any way to return the newer and modified element in JSON or JAVA? Your help should be appreciable. Even a hint will be a great start for me.

8

Reading the JSON documents as Maps and comparing them

You could read both JSON documents as Map<K, V>. See the below examples for Jackson and Gson:

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
TypeReference<HashMap<String, Object>> type = 
    new TypeReference<HashMap<String, Object>>() {};

Map<String, Object> leftMap = mapper.readValue(leftJson, type);
Map<String, Object> rightMap = mapper.readValue(rightJson, type);
Gson gson = new Gson();
Type type = new TypeToken<Map<String, Object>>(){}.getType();

Map<String, Object> leftMap = gson.fromJson(leftJson, type);
Map<String, Object> rightMap = gson.fromJson(rightJson, type);

Then use Guava's Maps.difference(Map<K, V>, Map<K, V>) to compare them. It returns a MapDifference<K, V> instance:

MapDifference<String, Object> difference = Maps.difference(leftMap, rightMap);

If you are not happy with the result, you can consider flattening the maps and then compare them. It will provide better comparison results especially for nested objects and arrays.

Creating flat Maps for the comparison

To flat the map, you can use:

public final class FlatMapUtil {

    private FlatMapUtil() {
        throw new AssertionError("No instances for you!");
    }

    public static Map<String, Object> flatten(Map<String, Object> map) {
        return map.entrySet().stream()
                .flatMap(FlatMapUtil::flatten)
                .collect(LinkedHashMap::new, (m, e) -> m.put("/" + e.getKey(), e.getValue()), LinkedHashMap::putAll);
    }

    private static Stream<Map.Entry<String, Object>> flatten(Map.Entry<String, Object> entry) {

        if (entry == null) {
            return Stream.empty();
        }

        if (entry.getValue() instanceof Map<?, ?>) {
            return ((Map<?, ?>) entry.getValue()).entrySet().stream()
                    .flatMap(e -> flatten(new AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<>(entry.getKey() + "/" + e.getKey(), e.getValue())));
        }

        if (entry.getValue() instanceof List<?>) {
            List<?> list = (List<?>) entry.getValue();
            return IntStream.range(0, list.size())
                    .mapToObj(i -> new AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<String, Object>(entry.getKey() + "/" + i, list.get(i)))
                    .flatMap(FlatMapUtil::flatten);
        }

        return Stream.of(entry);
    }
}

It uses the JSON Pointer notation defined in the RFC 6901 for the keys, so you can easily locate the values.

Example

Consider the following JSON documents:

{
  "name": {
    "first": "John",
    "last": "Doe"
  },
  "address": null,
  "birthday": "1980-01-01",
  "company": "Acme",
  "occupation": "Software engineer",
  "phones": [
    {
      "number": "000000000",
      "type": "home"
    },
    {
      "number": "999999999",
      "type": "mobile"
    }
  ]
}
{
  "name": {
    "first": "Jane",
    "last": "Doe",
    "nickname": "Jenny"
  },
  "birthday": "1990-01-01",
  "occupation": null,
  "phones": [
    {
      "number": "111111111",
      "type": "mobile"
    }
  ],
  "favorite": true,
  "groups": [
    "close-friends",
    "gym"
  ]
}

And the following code to compare them and show the differences:

Map<String, Object> leftFlatMap = FlatMapUtil.flatten(leftMap);
Map<String, Object> rightFlatMap = FlatMapUtil.flatten(rightMap);

MapDifference<String, Object> difference = Maps.difference(leftFlatMap, rightFlatMap);

System.out.println("Entries only on the left\n--------------------------");
difference.entriesOnlyOnLeft()
          .forEach((key, value) -> System.out.println(key + ": " + value));

System.out.println("\n\nEntries only on the right\n--------------------------");
difference.entriesOnlyOnRight()
          .forEach((key, value) -> System.out.println(key + ": " + value));

System.out.println("\n\nEntries differing\n--------------------------");
difference.entriesDiffering()
          .forEach((key, value) -> System.out.println(key + ": " + value));

It will produce the following output:

Entries only on the left
--------------------------
/address: null
/phones/1/number: 999999999
/phones/1/type: mobile
/company: Acme


Entries only on the right
--------------------------
/name/nickname: Jenny
/groups/0: close-friends
/groups/1: gym
/favorite: true


Entries differing
--------------------------
/birthday: (1980-01-01, 1990-01-01)
/occupation: (Software engineer, null)
/name/first: (John, Jane)
/phones/0/number: (000000000, 111111111)
/phones/0/type: (home, mobile)
  • 1
    Thanks a lot for your clear explanation Cassio...I will check and let you know – VelNaga Jun 21 '18 at 21:01
  • Here it throws nullPointerException "return Stream.of(entry);" if the entry is null. – VelNaga Jul 20 '18 at 14:08
  • ah, Exception comes from "Map.Entry::getValue". so we should have a null check there because value can be null – VelNaga Jul 20 '18 at 14:13
  • Do you have any suggestion? Meanwhile i am also working on this – VelNaga Jul 20 '18 at 14:18
  • 1
    @VelNaga If it answers your original question, please accept my answer. And, yes, you can customize the code as per your needs. You can use .filter() to remove the keys you don't want to compare while processing the streams or simply remove the key from the comparison result. But it goes beyond the scope of your original question. – cassiomolin Jul 21 '18 at 12:33
8

Creating a JSON Patch document

Alternatively to the approach described in the other answer, you could use the Java API for JSON Processing defined in the JSR 374 (it doesn't use on Gson or Jackson). The following dependencies are required:

<!-- Java API for JSON Processing (API) -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>javax.json</groupId>
    <artifactId>javax.json-api</artifactId>
    <version>1.1.2</version>
</dependency>

<!-- Java API for JSON Processing (implementation) -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.glassfish</groupId>
    <artifactId>javax.json</artifactId>
    <version>1.1.2</version>
</dependency>

Then you can create a JSON diff from the JSON documents. It will produce a JSON Patch document as defined in the RFC 6902:

JsonPatch diff = Json.createDiff(source, target);

When applied to the source document, the JSON Patch yields the target document. The JSON Patch can be applied to the source document using:

JsonObject patched = diff.apply(source);

Creating a JSON Merge Patch document

Depending on your needs, you could create a JSON Merge Patch document as defined in the RFC 7396:

JsonMergePatch mergeDiff = Json.createMergeDiff(source, target);

When applied to the source document, the JSON Merge Patch yields the target document. To patch the source, use:

JsonValue patched = mergeDiff.apply(source);

Pretty printing JSON documents

To pretty print the JSON documents, you can use:

System.out.println(format(diff.toJsonArray()));
System.out.println(format(mergeDiff.toJsonValue()));
public static String format(JsonValue json) {
    StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
    prettyPrint(json, stringWriter);
    return stringWriter.toString();
}

public static void prettyPrint(JsonValue json, Writer writer) {
    Map<String, Object> config =
            Collections.singletonMap(JsonGenerator.PRETTY_PRINTING, true);
    JsonWriterFactory writerFactory = Json.createWriterFactory(config);
    try (JsonWriter jsonWriter = writerFactory.createWriter(writer)) {
        jsonWriter.write(json);
    }
}

Example

Consider the following JSON documents:

{
  "name": {
    "first": "John",
    "last": "Doe"
  },
  "address": null,
  "birthday": "1980-01-01",
  "company": "Acme",
  "occupation": "Software engineer",
  "phones": [
    {
      "number": "000000000",
      "type": "home"
    },
    {
      "number": "999999999",
      "type": "mobile"
    }
  ]
}
{
  "name": {
    "first": "Jane",
    "last": "Doe",
    "nickname": "Jenny"
  },
  "birthday": "1990-01-01",
  "occupation": null,
  "phones": [
    {
      "number": "111111111",
      "type": "mobile"
    }
  ],
  "favorite": true,
  "groups": [
    "close-friends",
    "gym"
  ]
}

And the following code to produce a JSON Patch:

JsonValue source = Json.createReader(new StringReader(leftJson)).readValue();
JsonValue target = Json.createReader(new StringReader(rightJson)).readValue();

JsonPatch diff = Json.createDiff(source.asJsonObject(), target.asJsonObject());
System.out.println(format(diff.toJsonArray()));

It will produce the following output:

[
    {
        "op": "replace",
        "path": "/name/first",
        "value": "Jane"
    },
    {
        "op": "add",
        "path": "/name/nickname",
        "value": "Jenny"
    },
    {
        "op": "remove",
        "path": "/address"
    },
    {
        "op": "replace",
        "path": "/birthday",
        "value": "1990-01-01"
    },
    {
        "op": "remove",
        "path": "/company"
    },
    {
        "op": "replace",
        "path": "/occupation",
        "value": null
    },
    {
        "op": "replace",
        "path": "/phones/1/number",
        "value": "111111111"
    },
    {
        "op": "remove",
        "path": "/phones/0"
    },
    {
        "op": "add",
        "path": "/favorite",
        "value": true
    },
    {
        "op": "add",
        "path": "/groups",
        "value": [
            "close-friends",
            "gym"
        ]
    }
]

Now consider the following code to produce a JSON Merge Patch:

JsonValue source = Json.createReader(new StringReader(leftJson)).readValue();
JsonValue target = Json.createReader(new StringReader(rightJson)).readValue();

JsonMergePatch mergeDiff = Json.createMergeDiff(source, target);
System.out.println(format(mergeDiff.toJsonValue()));

It will produce the following output:

{
    "name": {
        "first": "Jane",
        "nickname": "Jenny"
    },
    "address": null,
    "birthday": "1990-01-01",
    "company": null,
    "occupation": null,
    "phones": [
        {
            "number": "111111111",
            "type": "mobile"
        }
    ],
    "favorite": true,
    "groups": [
        "close-friends",
        "gym"
    ]
}

Different results when applying the patches

When the patch document is applied, the results are slightly different for the approaches described above. Consider the following code that applies JSON Patch to a document:

JsonPatch diff = ...
JsonValue patched = diff.apply(source.asJsonObject());
System.out.println(format(patched));

It produces:

{
    "name": {
        "first": "Jane",
        "last": "Doe",
        "nickname": "Jenny"
    },
    "birthday": "1990-01-01",
    "occupation": null,
    "phones": [
        {
            "number": "111111111",
            "type": "mobile"
        }
    ],
    "favorite": true,
    "groups": [
        "close-friends",
        "gym"
    ]
}

Now consider the following code that applies JSON Merge Patch to a document:

JsonMergePatch mergeDiff = ...
JsonValue patched = mergeDiff.apply(source);
System.out.println(format(patched));

It produces:

{
    "name": {
        "first": "Jane",
        "last": "Doe",
        "nickname": "Jenny"
    },
    "birthday": "1990-01-01",
    "phones": [
        {
            "number": "111111111",
            "type": "mobile"
        }
    ],
    "favorite": true,
    "groups": [
        "close-friends",
        "gym"
    ]
}

In the first example, the occupation property is null. In the second example, it's omitted. It's due to the null semantics on JSON Merge Patch. From the RFC 7396:

If the target does contain the member, the value is replaced. Null values in the merge patch are given special meaning to indicate the removal of existing values in the target. [...]

This design means that merge patch documents are suitable for describing modifications to JSON documents that primarily use objects for their structure and do not make use of explicit null values. The merge patch format is not appropriate for all JSON syntaxes.

  • Looks like your solution can't handle different order of an array, like those two are the same : [ {f:"a"},{f:"b"}] == [ {f:"b"},{f:"a"}], but your code said it is different – Justin Jul 8 at 20:53
  • @Justin As per the RFC 8259 (the document that defines the JSON format), the order of the elements of the array matters (highlights are mine): An object is an unordered collection of zero or more name/value pairs, where a name is a string and a value is a string, number, boolean, null, object, or array. An array is an ordered sequence of zero or more values. So [{"f":"a"},{"f":"b"}] and [{"f":"b"},{"f":"a"}] are different. – cassiomolin Jul 9 at 12:49
  • 1
    You are right, My mistaken. – Justin Jul 9 at 13:57

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