I have to functions to generate a hash (sha512) of a random element. The first one is a oracle sql query:

select RAND, DBMS_CRYPTO.HASH(RAND, 6 /*SHA512*/) as sha512 from 
    (select DBMS_CRYPTO.RANDOMBYTES(5) as RAND from DUAL);

which returns

RAND
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SHA512                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C1BEC41854                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
E4BD639D4726D294CB63B6DDC651C6B6F5708ED3FC9B2E08A71DD7D36958B7B13BD31ECA28039565121F3067167D719292A86B6CAD052EFC9A56923594946084

When I try to generate the hash for C1BEC41854 in python I use the following script

from hashlib import sha512
h = 'C1BEC41854'
b = bytes.fromhex(h)
print(sha512(b).hexdigest())

which returns

a63f4d25b5f0fc51fb27ae1e1c5f4ff19edc7b790d2373071ae8f454e63766a19b69a200690a32a65dd57be5b47fec29ee15c354f52ad5916127bb4cf674ab37

Can you please help me figure out why the both hashes are not identical?

  • That string C1BEC41854 needs to be converted into bytes before being hashed (it's not magic). Are both methods using the same encoding algorithm? Maybe one has a default UTF-8 encoding and the other one uses ISO-8859-1 or other. – The Impaler Jun 21 at 14:53
  • Are both methods using the same padding? – The Impaler Jun 21 at 14:54
  • Are you using any salt to hash? (you should) Is it the same salt on both sides? – The Impaler Jun 21 at 14:55
  • @TheImpaler no i am not using any salt. atmI am just trying to generate a matching hash. As soon as this works I will include the salt. Also DBMS_CRYPTO.RANDOMBYTES() returns RAW so this schould be bytes and in bytes.fromhex(h) i get a bytes object in python – jan-seins Jun 21 at 15:02
  • When I try this without the DBMS_CRYPTO.RANDOMBYTES() but with a defined string hallo like this: select RAND, dbms_crypto.hash(RAND, 6 /*SHA512*/) as sha512 from (select UTL_I18N.STRING_TO_RAW( 'hallo', 'AL32UTF8' ) as RAND from dual); it is working just fine – jan-seins Jun 21 at 15:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your Oracle query, you're generating multiple random byte strings.

Try this to demonstrate:

select RAND, RAND, RAND, DBMS_CRYPTO.HASH(RAND, 6 /*SHA512*/) as sha512 from 
    (select DBMS_CRYPTO.RANDOMBYTES(5) as RAND from DUAL);

Note the three different values for RAND. So the hash you are generating is actually for a different byte sequence than you think it is.

To fix it, you can use this bit of trickery courtesy of AskTom

select RAND,DBMS_CRYPTO.HASH(RAND, 6 /*SHA512*/) as sha512 from 
    (select rownum, DBMS_CRYPTO.RANDOMBYTES(5) as RAND from DUAL);

including rownum in the subquery makes RAND consistent each time you use it as a field in the top level SELECT.

AskTom Question on the subject

This will give you the same result (uppercased):

SELECT sys.dbms_crypto.hash(
  hextoraw('C1BEC41854'),
  6--HASH_SH512
) from dual;

Looks like your string is a hex value already, so I just did a hextoraw. If it was a basic string like 'Hello' then I'd use utl_raw.cast_to_raw.

Output:

A63F4D25B5F0FC51FB27AE1E1C5F4FF19EDC7B790D2373071AE8F454E63766A19B69A200690A32A65DD57BE5B47FEC29EE15C354F52AD5916127BB4CF674AB37

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