I've got a problem with using a reserve (backslash) declaration for priority disambiguation. Below is a self-contained example. The production 'Ipv4Address' is a strict subset of 'Domain0'. In parsing URL's, though, you want dotted-quad addresses to be handled differently than domain names, so you want to split 'Domain0' into two parts; 'Domain1' is one of those two parts. The test suite included, however, is failing at 't3()', where 'Domain1' is accepting an IP address, which looks like it should be excluded.

Is this a problem with the reserve declaration, or is this a defect in the current version of Rascal? I'm on the 0.10.x unstable branch at present, per advice to see if that corrected a different problem (with the Tutor). I haven't checked with the stable branch since keeping them both installed means parallel Eclipse environments, which I haven't been motivated to do.

module grammar_test

import ParseTree;

syntax Domain0 = { Subdomain '.' }+;
syntax Domain1 = Domain0 \ IPv4Address ;
lexical Subdomain = [0-9A-Za-z]+ | [0-9A-Za-z]+'-'[a-zA-Z0-9\-]*[a-zA-Z0-9] ;
lexical IPv4Address = DecimalOctet '.' DecimalOctet '.' DecimalOctet '.' DecimalOctet ; 
lexical DecimalOctet = [0-9] | [1-9][0-9] | '1'[0-9][0-9] | '2'[0-4][0-9] | '25'[0-5] ;

test bool t1()
{
    return parseAccept(#IPv4Address, "192.168.0.1");
}   

test bool t2()
{
    return parseAccept(#Domain0, "192.168.0.1");
}   

test bool t3()
{
    return parseReject(#Domain1, "192.168.0.1");
}   

bool parseAccept( type[&T<:Tree] begin, str input )
{
    try
    {
        parse(begin, input, allowAmbiguity=false);
    }
    catch ParseError(loc _):
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

bool parseReject( type[&T<:Tree] begin, str input )
{
    try
    {
        parse(begin, input, allowAmbiguity=false);
    }
    catch ParseError(loc _):
    {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

This example has been cut down from larger code. I first encountered the error in a larger scope. Using the rule "IPv4Address | Domain1" was throwing an Ambiguity exception, which I tracked down to the behavior that "Domain1" was accepting something it shouldn't be. Curiously "IPv4Address > Domain1" was also throwing Ambiguity, but I'm guessing this has the same root cause as the present isolated example.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The difference operator for keyword reservations currently only works correctly if the right-hand side is a finite language expressed as disjunction of literal keywords like "if" | "then" | "while" or a non-terminal which is defined like that: lexical X = "if" | "then" | "while". And then you can writeA \ X` for some effect.

For other types of non-terminals the parser is just generated but the \ constraint has no effect. You wrote Domain0 \ IPv4Address and IPv3Address does not hold to the above assumption.

(We should either add a warning about that or generate a parser which can implement the full semantics of language difference; but that's for another time).

Admittedly such a powerful difference operator could be used to express an some order of preference between non-terminals. Alas.

Possible (sketches of) solutions:

  • stage two passes solution: parse the input using the more general Subdomain syntax, then pattern and match rewrite in a single pass all quadruples to IPv4Address
  • maximal munch solution: adapt the grammar using follow restrictions to implement eager behavior for the IPv4Address, like {Subdomain !>> [.][0-9] "."}+ or something in that vain.
  • Thanks for the quick answer. I'd say the first thing to do is to document the actual limitations of the difference operator. Also, I'd recommend an error instead of a warning if the preconditions for the second argument are not met; this isn't a parse error but rather a limitation error. Regardless, I'd rather not have a parser at all than one that I might be tempted to believe matches the grammar I wrote. – eh9 Jun 21 at 17:41
  • Also. I'm a bit surprised that difference isn't implemented, since GLR already has the needed mechanisms. When recognizing "A\B", you can always split (as if parsing an ambiguity). Then if A recognizes first (accept or reject), you use its result and discard B. If B accepts first, you discard both A and B and reject A\B. If B rejects first, discard B. This approach doesn't require any static grammar analysis. Now, having said this, it seems that using this in combination with a recursive rule could lead to exponential behavior. It might be prudent to add some kind of recursion limit. – eh9 Jun 21 at 17:49
  • The glr algorithm (the sdf2 one i know and implemented) is more general indeed but broken in very subtle ways due to scheduling of reductions and order dependence. So for rascal we opted for a simpler solution first with obvious limitations but no unexpected loopholes. The GLL algorithm would be amenable but only by choosing depth first over bread first exploration. That has some nasty memory effects though. So the jury is still out. I was hoping to use the more elegant solution of Afroozeh and Izmaylova's data dependent GLL in the near future. inspirations can be found in "booleaN grammars". – jurgenv Jun 22 at 20:46
  • Point taken on the documentation and the fast failure! We will change the static checker (under development) which btw also predicts a lot of common ambiguities in grammars. – jurgenv Jun 22 at 20:48
  • Btw, the glr Solution for rejected rules by Visser for sdf2 is not exponential. It's polynomial at worst. So that's good. – jurgenv Jun 22 at 21:45

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