167

If I have a string

00020300504
00000234892839
000239074

how can I get rid of the leading zeroes so that I will only have this

20300504
234892839
239074

note that the number above was generated randomly.

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  • Are these three separate strings, or one string with newlines separating each number? I noticed when editing your question that you had <br> tags separating the numbers; are they actually part of your string? – erisco Feb 23 '11 at 23:42

10 Answers 10

472

ltrim:

$str = ltrim($str, '0');
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  • 2
    Caveat $str := '0'. Addressed in my answer, based on this answer. – Mike Weir Dec 4 '15 at 3:58
  • why overcomplicate things? and mike it's $str += 0; as explained here: nabtron.com/kiss-code – Nabeel Khan Apr 16 '16 at 23:58
  • @NabeelKhan That would not answer the question, which does not ask to convert the string to an integer. See the comments on Svisstack's answer for why this is not such a great solution. – lonesomeday Apr 18 '16 at 8:15
  • @lonesomeday you should read his question carefully where he mentions: "note that the number above was generated randomly." so they're integers already :) – Nabeel Khan Apr 18 '16 at 8:26
  • 1
    Caution: This will turn '0' into '' – Goose Dec 29 '16 at 18:09
12
(string)((int)"00000234892839")
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  • I just tried an (int) "00009384783473" (random number) and my result was 2147483647. If I cast it as a float however, it seems to work ok. Strange – JamesHalsall Feb 23 '11 at 23:37
  • manual says that "The size of an integer is platform-dependent, although a maximum value of about two billion is the usual value (that's 32 bits signed)" – llamerr Feb 23 '11 at 23:39
  • 1
    Not strange. Integers in php go up to 2^31, which is 2147483647. For any larger numbers, you'll have to use lonesomeday's string-based solution. – awm Feb 23 '11 at 23:41
  • 1
    Casting to float might appear to work, but at some point you'll get roundoff errors. – awm Feb 23 '11 at 23:43
  • 1
    how about the idea of evaluating each of the string by using a loop statement, that when it gets to a non zero digit(or string), it will get the index of that digit and drop all the preceding zero's then echo the string which starts with the first non zero value.. – Gerald Feb 24 '11 at 0:13
10

Don't know why people are using so complex methods to achieve such a simple thing! And regex? Wow!

Here you go, the easiest and simplest way (as explained here: https://nabtron.com/kiss-code/ ):

$a = '000000000000001';
$a += 0;

echo $a; // will output 1
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  • 2
    This seems like a simpler solution, but it doesn't handle any size of string like other answers do. You're converting from a string to an integer and then back as a string - simpler to merely shorten the string. – Mike Weir Oct 12 '16 at 18:41
  • 1
    Interesting, but I don't know if it's the best solution with the type conversions. – jonathanbell Mar 2 '17 at 18:52
  • 2
    Please don't do this... this is why PHP gets a bad rep – Dan F. Jan 18 '19 at 8:18
9

Similar to another suggestion, except will not obliterate actual zero:

if (ltrim($str, '0') != '') {
    $str = ltrim($str, '0');
} else {
    $str = '0';
}

Or as was suggested (as of PHP 5.3), shorthand ternary operator can be used:

$str = ltrim($str, '0') ?: '0'; 
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  • 1
    $str = ltrim($str, '0') ?: '0'; -- no redundant trim call. – mickmackusa Jun 26 at 16:23
8

you can add "+" in your variable,

example :

$numString = "0000001123000";
echo +$numString;
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3

Regex was proposed already, but not correctly:

<?php
    $number = '00000004523423400023402340240';
    $withoutLeadingZeroes = preg_replace('/^0+/', '', $number)
    echo $withoutLeadingZeroes;
?>

output is then:

4523423400023402340240

Background on Regex: the ^ signals beginning of string and the + sign signals more or none of the preceding sign. Therefore, the regex ^0+ matches all zeroes at the beginning of a string.

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  • preg_replace() expects at least 3 parameters, 2 given – TarangP Jan 21 '19 at 12:10
2

I don't think preg_replace is the answer.. old thread but just happen to looking for this today. ltrim and (int) casting is the winner.

<?php
 $numString = "0000001123000";
 $actualInt = "1123000";

 $fixed_str1 = preg_replace('/000+/','',$numString);
 $fixed_str2 = ltrim($numString, '0');
 $fixed_str3 = (int)$numString;

 echo $numString . " Original";
 echo "<br>"; 
 echo $fixed_str1 . " Fix1";
 echo "<br>"; 
 echo $fixed_str2 . " Fix2";
 echo "<br>";
 echo $fixed_str3 . " Fix3";
 echo "<br>";
 echo $actualInt . " Actual integer in string";

 //output

 0000001123000 Origina
 1123 Fix1
 1123000 Fix2
 1123000 Fix3
 1123000 Actual integer in tring
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  • If you add the ^ operator at the start of the regex, it is a valid solution though. – twicejr Feb 13 '18 at 12:08
0

Im Fixed with this way.

its very simple. only pass a string its remove zero start of string.

function removeZeroString($str='')
{
    while(trim(substr($str,0,1)) === '0')
    {
        $str = ltrim($str,'0');
    }
    return $str;
}
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-1

Ajay Kumar offers the simplest echo +$numString; I use these:

echo round($val = "0005");
echo $val = 0005;
    //both output 5
echo round($val = 00000648370000075845);
echo round($val = "00000648370000075845");
    //output 648370000075845, no need to care about the other zeroes in the number
    //like with regex or comparative functions. Works w/wo single/double quotes

Actually any math function will take the number from the "string" and treat it like so. It's much simpler than any regex or comparative functions. I saw that in php.net, don't remember where.

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-2

Assuming you want a run-on of three or more zeros to be removed and your example is one string:

    $test_str ="0002030050400000234892839000239074";
    $fixed_str = preg_replace('/000+/','',$test_str);

You can make the regex pattern fit what you need if my assumptions are off.

This help?

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  • 1
    Incorrect, sorry. This will also cut the '000' from the middle of the string. – Filip OvertoneSinger Rydlo Nov 28 '16 at 16:10

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