1

I have a bunch of images that look like this of someone playing a videogame (a simple game I created in Tkinter):

Ball falling in videogame; player's box is at the bottom

The idea of the game is that the user controls the box at the bottom of the screen in order to dodge the falling balls (they can only dodge left and right).

My goal is to have the neural network output the position of the player on the bottom of the screen. If they're totally on the left, the neural network should output a 0, if they're in the middle, a .5, and all the way right, a 1, and all the values in-between.

My images are 300x400 pixels. I stored my data very simply. I recorded each of the images and position of the player as a tuple for each frame in a 50-frame game. Thus my result was a list in the form [(image, player position), ...] with 50 elements. I then pickled that list.

So in my code I try to create an extremely basic feed-forward network that takes in the image and outputs a value between 0 and 1 representing where the box on the bottom of the image is. But my neural network is only outputting 1s.

What should I change in order to get it to train and output values close to what I want?

Of course, here is my code:

# machine learning code mostly from https://machinelearningmastery.com/tutorial-first-neural-network-python-keras/

from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense
import numpy as np
import pickle

def pil_image_to_np_array(image):
    '''Takes an image and converts it to a numpy array'''
    # from https://stackoverflow.com/a/45208895
    # all my images are black and white, so I only need one channel
    return np.array(image)[:, :, 0:1]

def data_to_training_set(data):
    # split the list in the form [(frame 1 image, frame 1 player position), ...] into [[all images], [all player positions]]
    inputs, outputs = [list(val) for val in zip(*data)]
    for index, image in enumerate(inputs):
        # convert the PIL images into numpy arrays so Keras can process them
        inputs[index] = pil_image_to_np_array(image)
    return (inputs, outputs)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # fix random seed for reproducibility
    np.random.seed(7)

    # load data
    # data will be in the form [(frame 1 image, frame 1 player position), (frame 2 image, frame 2 player position), ...]
    with open("position_data1.pkl", "rb") as pickled_data:
        data = pickle.load(pickled_data)
    X, Y = data_to_training_set(data)

    # get the width of the images
    width = X[0].shape[1] # == 400
    # convert the player position (a value between 0 and the width of the image) to values between 0 and 1
    for index, output in enumerate(Y):
        Y[index] = output / width

    # flatten the image inputs so they can be passed to a neural network
    for index, inpt in enumerate(X):
        X[index] = np.ndarray.flatten(inpt)

    # keras expects an array (not a list) of image-arrays for input to the neural network
    X = np.array(X)
    Y = np.array(Y)

    # create model
    model = Sequential()
    # my images are 300 x 400 pixels, so each input will be a flattened array of 120000 gray-scale pixel values
    # keep it super simple by not having any deep learning
    model.add(Dense(1, input_dim=120000, activation='sigmoid'))

    # Compile model
    model.compile(loss='mean_squared_error', optimizer='adam')

    # Fit the model
    model.fit(X, Y, epochs=15, batch_size=10)

    # see what the model is doing
    predictions = model.predict(X, batch_size=10)
    print(predictions) # this prints all 1s! # TODO fix

EDIT: print(Y) gives me:

<code>print(Y)</code>

so it's definitely not all zeroes.

  • Have you checked the values stored in Y right after the line Y = np.array(Y)? Aren't they all zero? – today Jun 22 '18 at 19:34
  • Nope, when I do print(Y) right after the Y = np.array(Y) line I get a lot of values. (I'll post the image in an edit.) – Pro Q Jun 22 '18 at 19:37
  • I'm wondering if maybe I should bring down the values in my photos to all be in the range 0-1. Maybe having them be at 255 is just flooding the network and the weights don't get small enough to fix it. – Pro Q Jun 22 '18 at 19:39
  • What is the loss value during training? Does it decrease? Yes, if you normalize the image values the training process would be much more stable and efficient. Normalize X right after the line X = np.array(X) like this: X_mean = np.mean(X, axis=0) next line: X -= X_mean next line: X_std = np.std(X, axis=0) next line: X /= X_std. – today Jun 22 '18 at 19:46
  • I just tried dividing all my images by 255 to bring them down into range, and that made the network output all 0s. – Pro Q Jun 22 '18 at 19:47
1

Of course, a deeper model might give you a better accuracy, but considering the fact that your images are simple, a pretty simple (shallow) model with only one hidden layer should give a medium to high accuracy. So here are the modifications you need to make this happen:

  1. Make sure X and Y are of type float32 (currently, X is of type uint8):

    X = np.array(X, dtype=np.float32)
    Y = np.array(Y, dtype=np.float32)
    
  2. When training a neural network it would be much better to normalize the training data. Normalization helps the optimization process to go smoothly and speed up the convergence to a solution. It further prevent large values to cause large gradient updates which would be desruptive. Usually, the values of each feature in the input data should fall in a small range, where two common ranges are [-1,1] and [0,1]. Therefore, to make sure that all values fall in the range [-1,1], we subtract from each feature its mean and divide it by its standard deviation:

    X_mean = X.mean(axis=0)
    X -= X_mean
    X_std = X.std(axis=0)
    X /= X_std + 1e-8  # add a very small constant to prevent division by zero
    

    Note that we are normalizing each feature (i.e. each pixel in this case) here not each image. When you want to predict on new data, i.e. in inference or testing mode, you need to subtract X_mean from test data and divide it by X_std (you should NEVER EVER subtract from test data its own mean or divide it by its own standard deviation; rather, use the mean and std of training data):

    X_test -= X_mean
    X_test /= X_std + 1e-8
    
  3. If you apply the changes in points one and two, you might notice that the network no longer predicts only ones or only zeros. Rather, it shows some faint signs of learning and predicts a mix of zeros and ones. This is not bad but it is far from good and we have high expectations! The predictions should be much better than a mix of only zeros and ones. There, you should take into account the (forgotten!) learning rate. Since the network has relatively large number of parameters considering a relatively simple problem (and there are a few samples of training data), you should choose a smaller learning rate to smooth the gradient updates and the learning process:

    from keras import optimizers
    model.compile(loss='mean_squared_error', optimizer=optimizers.Adam(lr=0.0001))
    

    You would notice the difference: the loss value reaches to around 0.01 after 10 epochs. And the network no longer predicts a mix of zeros and ones; rather the predictions are much more accurate and close to what they should be (i.e. Y).

  4. Don't forget! We have high (logical!) expectations. So, how can we do better without adding any new layers to the network (obviously, we assume that adding more layers might help!!)?

    4.1. Gather more training data.

    4.2. Add weight regularization. Common ones are L1 and L2 regularization (I highly recommend the Jupyter notebooks of the the book Deep Learning with Python written by François Chollet the creator of Keras. Specifically, here is the one which discusses regularization.)

  1. You should always evaluate your model in a proper and unbiased way. Evaluating it on the training data (that you have used to train it) does not tell you anything about how well your model would perform on unseen (i.e. new or real world) data points (e.g. consider a model which stores or memorize all the training data. It would perform perfectly on the training data, but it would be a useless model and perform poorly on new data). So we should have test and train datasets: we train model on the training data and evaluate the model on the test (i.e. new) data. However, during the process of coming up with a good model you are performing lots of experiments: for example, you first change the type and number of layers, train the model and then evaluate it on test data to make sure it is good. Then you change another thing say the learning rate, train it again and then evaluate it again on test data... To make it short, these cycles of tuning and evaluations somehow causes an over-fitting on the test data. Therefore, we would need a third dataset called validation data (read more: What is the difference between test set and validation set?):

    # first shuffle the data to make sure it isn't in any particular order
    indices = np.arange(X.shape[0])
    np.random.shuffle(indices)
    X = X[indices]
    Y = Y[indices]
    
    # you have 200 images
    # we select 100 images for training,
    # 50 images for validation and 50 images for test data
    X_train = X[:100]
    X_val = X[100:150]
    X_test = X[150:]
    Y_train = Y[:100]
    Y_val = Y[100:150]
    Y_test = Y[150:]
    
    # train and tune the model 
    # you can attempt train and tune the model multiple times,
    # each time with different architecture, hyper-parameters, etc.
    model.fit(X_train, Y_train, epochs=15, batch_size=10, validation_data=(X_val, Y_val))
    
    # only and only after completing the tuning of your model
    # you should evaluate it on the test data for just one time
    model.evaluate(X_test, Y_test)
    
    # after you are satisfied with the model performance
    # and want to deploy your model for production use (i.e. real world)
    # you can train your model once more on the whole data available
    # with the best configurations you have found out in your tunings
    model.fit(X, Y, epochs=15, batch_size=10)
    

    (Actually, when we have few training data available it would be wasteful to separate validation and test data from whole available data. In this case, and if the model is not computationally expensive, instead of separating a validation set which is called cross-validation, one can do K-fold cross-validation or iterated K-fold cross-validation in case of having very few data samples.)


It is around 4 AM at the time of writing this answer and I am feeling sleepy, but I would like to mention one more thing which is not directly related to your question: by using the Numpy library and its functionalities and methods you can write more concise and efficient code and also save yourself a lot time. So make sure you practice using it more as it is heavily used in machine learning community and libraries. To demonstrate this, here is the same code you have written but with more use of Numpy (Note that I have not applied all the changes I mentioned above in this code):

# machine learning code mostly from https://machinelearningmastery.com/tutorial-first-neural-network-python-keras/

from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense
import numpy as np
import pickle

def pil_image_to_np_array(image):
    '''Takes an image and converts it to a numpy array'''
    # from https://stackoverflow.com/a/45208895
    # all my images are black and white, so I only need one channel
    return np.array(image)[:, :, 0]

def data_to_training_set(data):
    # split the list in the form [(frame 1 image, frame 1 player position), ...] into [[all images], [all player positions]]
    inputs, outputs = zip(*data)
    inputs = [pil_image_to_np_array(image) for image in inputs]
    inputs = np.array(inputs, dtype=np.float32)
    outputs = np.array(outputs, dtype=np.float32)
    return (inputs, outputs)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # fix random seed for reproducibility
    np.random.seed(7)

    # load data
    # data will be in the form [(frame 1 image, frame 1 player position), (frame 2 image, frame 2 player position), ...]
    with open("position_data1.pkl", "rb") as pickled_data:
        data = pickle.load(pickled_data)
    X, Y = data_to_training_set(data)

    # get the width of the images
    width = X.shape[2] # == 400
    # convert the player position (a value between 0 and the width of the image) to values between 0 and 1
    Y /= width

    # flatten the image inputs so they can be passed to a neural network
    X = np.reshape(X, (X.shape[0], -1))

    # create model
    model = Sequential()
    # my images are 300 x 400 pixels, so each input will be a flattened array of 120000 gray-scale pixel values
    # keep it super simple by not having any deep learning
    model.add(Dense(1, input_dim=120000, activation='sigmoid'))

    # Compile model
    model.compile(loss='mean_squared_error', optimizer='adam')

    # Fit the model
    model.fit(X, Y, epochs=15, batch_size=10)

    # see what the model is doing
    predictions = model.predict(X, batch_size=10)
    print(predictions) # this prints all 1s! # TODO fix
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