1

Some of my files are in incorrect directories, and I am trying to move them to their correct location.

example:

directory 20180622 will contain only file names having 20180622 in their name

if 20180622 directory contains a file having 20180623 in its name then it is a misplaced file and should goto corresponding correct directory viz 20180623 directory structure is fixed (fortunately)

date1/a/b/someprefix.date1.somesuffix #no problem
date1/a/b/someprefix.date2.somesuffix # problem
date2/c/d/someprefix.date2.somesuffix # no problem
date2/e/f/someprefix.date3.somesuffix # problem

date1/a/b/someprefix.date1.somesuffix
date2/a/b/someprefix.date2.somesuffix # problem fixed
date2/c/d/someprefix.date2.somesuffix
date3/e/f/someprefix.date3.somesuffix #problem fixed

using find . -type f i get list of all files but not getting how to mv the files to correct place. someprefix can be anything (it may contain a dot aswell so cut is not a good way to extract date from filename) $f =~ (.*)(201[5-8][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9])(.*) is what i am trying to get date extracted from filename

  • Are someprefix and somesuffix always the same? – choroba Jun 23 '18 at 11:49
  • unfortunately no :( , it could be anytext, i can only assure date will always be contained , however somesuffix always ends with .gz . I can run multiple commands for all set of someprefix if there is a solution with that – pythonRcpp Jun 23 '18 at 11:59
  • Given that Python is part of your username, I suggest using that instead of Bash to solve this problem. It will be easier to implement. – John Zwinck Jun 23 '18 at 12:03
  • You can learn how to manipulate bash parameters here: gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/… – Hielke Walinga Jun 23 '18 at 12:16
1

Unfortunately, with bash regular expression matching, you can't extract all submatches, so I'm falling back to grep to find all the dates.

find . -type f -print0 |
  while IFS= read -d "" -r filename; do
    mapfile -t dates < <(echo "$filename" | grep -Eo '\<201[5-8][0-9]{4}\>')
    if [[ ${#dates[@]} -eq 2 ]] && [[ ${dates[0]} != ${dates[1]} ]]; then
      destdir=$(dirname "$filename" | sed "s/${dates[0]}/${dates[1]}/")
      mkdir -p "$destdir"
      mv -v "$filename" "$destdir"
    fi
  done

Testing:

$ tree
.
├── 20180621
│   └── a
│       └── b
│           ├── a.20180621.txt
│           └── foo.20180701.bar
└── 20180701
    └── c
        └── d
            └── ok.20180701

6 directories, 3 files

We have one file that should be moved

$ find . -type f -print0 |
   while IFS= read -d "" -r filename; do
     mapfile -t dates < <(echo "$filename" | grep -Eo '\<201[5-8][0-9]{4}\>')
     if [[ ${#dates[@]} -eq 2 ]] && [[ ${dates[0]} != ${dates[1]} ]]; then
       destdir=$(dirname "$filename" | sed "s/${dates[0]}/${dates[1]}/")
       mkdir -p "$destdir"
       mv -v "$filename" "$destdir"
     fi
   done
'./20180621/a/b/foo.20180701.bar' -> './20180701/a/b/foo.20180701.bar'

and the result

$ tree
.
├── 20180621
│   └── a
│       └── b
│           └── a.20180621.txt
└── 20180701
    ├── a
    │   └── b
    │       └── foo.20180701.bar
    └── c
        └── d
            └── ok.20180701

8 directories, 3 files

Without relying on grep, and this is a tweak to Arount's answer:

find 20+([0-9])/ -type f -print0 |
    while IFS= read -d "" -r filename; do
        dirdate=${filename%%/*}
        if [[ "$(basename "$filename")" =~ 20[0-9]{6} ]]; then
            filedate=${BASH_REMATCH[0]}
            if [[ $dirdate != $filedate ]]; then
                dest=${filename/$dirdate/$filedate}
                echo mkdir -p "$(dirname "$dest")"
                echo mv -v "$filename" "$dest"
            fi
        fi
    done
1

It should be pretty easy to handle, you just need a loop and a if.

for path in $(find . -type f); do
    dirdate=$(echo $path | cut -d '/' -f 2)
    filedate=$(basename $path | cut -d '.' -f 2)

    if [[ $dirdate != $filedate ]]; then
        mv $path $(dirname $path | sed "s/$dirdate/$filedate/g")
    fi
done

The idea here is extremly simple: It loop in files getting the whole file path (./date1/a/b/prefix.date.suffix) and check if date1 is equal to date. If not it move the file to the same path where date1 was replaced by date.

Edit for comments

If you want to handle several delemiters for your filenames you just need to change the filedate= line like:

filedate=$(basename $path | awk -F'[._\-]' '{print $2}' 2> /dev/null)

It's a bit more trickier but let's say it's Bash.

2> /dev/null is to make awk's warnings silents.

  • yes that almost works, but prefix and suffix can have dot . or - or _as seprator so cutting date from filename is a problem for me now. i need a regex which gives me filenamedate=$(echo $path | cut -d '/' -f 5) now say i get sometext_date-sometext or dometext-date-sometext or sometext.date.sometext etc. So a regex that can extract pattern 201[5-8][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] from above would be ideal. date is alwasy in YYYYMMDD format seperated by something at both ends [anything]YYYYMMDD[anything] – pythonRcpp Jun 23 '18 at 12:43
  • something like $f =~ (.*)(201[5-8][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9])(.*) not sure though, just adding here as my try – pythonRcpp Jun 23 '18 at 12:48
  • @pythonRcpp I updated my answer. – Arount Jun 23 '18 at 14:06

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