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This question already has an answer here:

I was trying to POST the data using Ajax jQuery into Json API. But I am getting the following error.

HTTP403: FORBIDDEN - The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. (XHR)OPTIONS - http://127.0.0.1:7002/player/

But I was able to POST the data using POSTMAN.

Here is my code.

$(document).ready(function(){
  // Post the Data from register form

  $("#submit").click(function(){
    var FName= $("#PlayerFirstName").val();
    var LName= $("#PlayerLastName").val();
    var VEmailID= $("#PlayerEmailID").val();
    /*
    $.post("http://127.0.0.1:7002/player/",
      {first_name:FName,last_name:LName,email:VEmailID},
      function(data, status, jqXHR) {
        $("p").append('status: ' + status + ', data: ' + data);
      });

    */
    $.ajax({
      url:"http://127.0.0.1:7002/player/",
      type: "POST",
      data: {first_name:FName,last_name:LName,email:VEmailID},
      contentType:"application/json; charset=utf-8",
      dataType:"json",
     })
  })

});

marked as duplicate by Louys Patrice Bessette, Community Jun 24 '18 at 15:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Maybe you can check one of the countless duplicates, google or the search should find them easily. But in short, Chrome extensions such as Postman have cross domain permissions while your app doesn't, thus it gets denied. – Roope Jun 23 '18 at 23:32
0

It looks like you're making your request either to a different server or to a different port than URL of the page you're calling from, meaning that it is a cross-site HTTP request. From Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS):

...Additionally, for HTTP request methods that can cause side-effects on server's data (in particular, for HTTP methods other than GET, or for POST usage with certain MIME types), the specification mandates that browsers "preflight" the request, soliciting supported methods from the server with an HTTP OPTIONS request method, and then, upon "approval" from the server, sending the actual request with the actual HTTP request method...

You should allow the OPTIONS request at your server and send a response with Access-Control-Allow-Origin, Access-Control-Allow-Headers, Access-Control-Allow-Methods headers.

  • Thanks for your comments. I will request my API server admin to allow the options you mentioned. – VidyaSagar Jun 24 '18 at 0:09

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