105

How do I convert an integer to a hex string in C++?

I can find some ways to do it, but they mostly seem targeted towards C. It doesn't seem there's a native way to do it in C++. It is a pretty simple problem though; I've got an int which I'd like to convert to a hex string for later printing.

15 Answers 15

188

Use <iomanip>'s std::hex. If you print, just send it to std::cout, if not, then use std::stringstream

std::stringstream stream;
stream << std::hex << your_int;
std::string result( stream.str() );

You can prepend the first << with << "0x" or whatever you like if you wish.

Other manips of interest are std::oct (octal) and std::dec (back to decimal).

One problem you may encounter is the fact that this produces the exact amount of digits needed to represent it. You may use setfill and setw this to circumvent the problem:

stream << std::setfill ('0') << std::setw(sizeof(your_type)*2) 
       << std::hex << your_int;

So finally, I'd suggest such a function:

template< typename T >
std::string int_to_hex( T i )
{
  std::stringstream stream;
  stream << "0x" 
         << std::setfill ('0') << std::setw(sizeof(T)*2) 
         << std::hex << i;
  return stream.str();
}
  • 7
    @MSalters - quite on the contrary. Test your suggestion on the int type ;) – Kornel Kisielewicz Feb 24 '11 at 10:13
  • 2
    @LexFridman, to emit exactly the amount of hex digits as needed. Why emit 8 digits if the type is a uint8_t? – Kornel Kisielewicz Dec 31 '12 at 5:41
  • 9
    std::showbase will show a 0x prefix... – quaylar Nov 11 '13 at 15:40
  • 11
    WARNIG: this will not work for single byte because char is always threated as char – ov7a Feb 15 '16 at 9:36
  • 3
    You also require #include <sstream> – David Gausmann Feb 21 '18 at 15:57
32

To make it lighter and faster I suggest to use direct filling of a string.

template <typename I> std::string n2hexstr(I w, size_t hex_len = sizeof(I)<<1) {
    static const char* digits = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    std::string rc(hex_len,'0');
    for (size_t i=0, j=(hex_len-1)*4 ; i<hex_len; ++i,j-=4)
        rc[i] = digits[(w>>j) & 0x0f];
    return rc;
}
  • Will this work for any type? I mean also double, float, uint8_t? – S.R Aug 8 '17 at 15:13
  • This works well for intXX_t and uintXX_t – BrandonL Nov 23 '17 at 0:33
  • @S.R It works for integral types, not for double and float (and not for pointers) – Wolf Feb 6 '18 at 12:29
  • ... a very pragmatic (but valid) mix of C and C++, I'm not sure about speed ... for my taste, it's a bit dense. – Wolf Feb 6 '18 at 12:36
  • 1
    There are a lot of magic numbers here. – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 22 '18 at 20:32
21

Use std::stringstream to convert integers into strings and its special manipulators to set the base. For example like that:

std::stringstream sstream;
sstream << std::hex << my_integer;
std::string result = sstream.str();
13

Just print it as an hexadecimal number:

int i = /* ... */;
std::cout << std::hex << i;
  • I would use std::cout<<std::hex<<i<<std::dec;, otherwise all integers that are streamed out later will be in hex. You don't need to do that for the other answers that use stringstream because the stream is discarded after it is used, but cout lives forever. – Mark Lakata Jan 9 at 23:02
8

You can try the following. It's working...

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
string to_string(T t, ios_base & (*f)(ios_base&))
{
  ostringstream oss;
  oss << f << t;
  return oss.str();
}

int main ()
{
  cout<<to_string<long>(123456, hex)<<endl;
  system("PAUSE");
  return 0;
}
  • 1
    a nice answer, but beware that to_string is part of the namespace std in C++11 – Alex Jun 3 '14 at 9:00
  • @Alex yes, it is 2014 after all... heaven forbid we'll have to start dealing with C++14 soon. – Alex Jun 22 '14 at 13:53
4
int num = 30;
std::cout << std::hex << num << endl; // This should give you hexa- decimal of 30
4

This question is old, but I'm surprised why no one mentioned boost::format:

cout << (boost::format("%x") % 1234).str();  // output is: 4d2
4

Thanks to Lincoln's comment below, I've changed this answer.

The following answer properly handles 8-bit ints at compile time. It doees, however, require C++17. If you don't have C++17, you'll have to do something else (e.g. provide overloads of this function, one for uint8_t and one for int8_t, or use something besides "if constexpr", maybe enable_if).

template< typename T >
std::string int_to_hex( T i )
{
    // Ensure this function is called with a template parameter that makes sense. Note: static_assert is only available in C++11 and higher.
    static_assert(std::is_integral<T>::value, "Template argument 'T' must be a fundamental integer type (e.g. int, short, etc..).");

    std::stringstream stream;
    stream << "0x" << std::setfill ('0') << std::setw(sizeof(T)*2) << std::hex;

    // If T is an 8-bit integer type (e.g. uint8_t or int8_t) it will be 
    // treated as an ASCII code, giving the wrong result. So we use C++17's
    // "if constexpr" to have the compiler decides at compile-time if it's 
    // converting an 8-bit int or not.
    if constexpr (std::is_same_v<std::uint8_t, T>)
    {        
        // Unsigned 8-bit unsigned int type. Cast to int (thanks Lincoln) to 
        // avoid ASCII code interpretation of the int. The number of hex digits 
        // in the  returned string will still be two, which is correct for 8 bits, 
        // because of the 'sizeof(T)' above.
        stream << static_cast<int>(i);
    }        
    else if (std::is_same_v<std::int8_t, T>)
    {
        // For 8-bit signed int, same as above, except we must first cast to unsigned 
        // int, because values above 127d (0x7f) in the int will cause further issues.
        // if we cast directly to int.
        stream << static_cast<int>(static_cast<uint8_t>(i));
    }
    else
    {
        // No cast needed for ints wider than 8 bits.
        stream << i;
    }

    return stream.str();
}

Original answer that doesn't handle 8-bit ints correctly as I thought it did:

Kornel Kisielewicz's answer is great. But a slight addition helps catch cases where you're calling this function with template arguments that don't make sense (e.g. float) or that would result in messy compiler errors (e.g. user-defined type).

template< typename T >
std::string int_to_hex( T i )
{
  // Ensure this function is called with a template parameter that makes sense. Note: static_assert is only available in C++11 and higher.
  static_assert(std::is_integral<T>::value, "Template argument 'T' must be a fundamental integer type (e.g. int, short, etc..).");

  std::stringstream stream;
  stream << "0x" 
         << std::setfill ('0') << std::setw(sizeof(T)*2) 
         << std::hex << i;

         // Optional: replace above line with this to handle 8-bit integers.
         // << std::hex << std::to_string(i);

  return stream.str();
}

I've edited this to add a call to std::to_string because 8-bit integer types (e.g. std::uint8_t values passed) to std::stringstream are treated as char, which doesn't give you the result you want. Passing such integers to std::to_string handles them correctly and doesn't hurt things when using other, larger integer types. Of course you may possibly suffer a slight performance hit in these cases since the std::to_string call is unnecessary.

Note: I would have just added this in a comment to the original answer, but I don't have the rep to comment.

  • in my testing std::to_string(i) does not print std::uint8_t integers as hex. I think this may have to have separate conditions for both uint8_t and int8_t types, since they need to be cast to larger integers. – Lincoln Oct 11 '18 at 14:25
  • 1
    @Lincoln You are right. I don't know what I was doing at the time (months ago now) that made me thing to_string handled 8-bit ints. I even went back to the compiler version I think I was using back then, just to double check, but to_string didn't work as I said it did. So who knows? Anyway, thanks for catching this - I've edited answer to something that should work correctly. – Loss Mentality Nov 21 '18 at 16:17
2

For those of you who figured out that many/most of the ios::fmtflags don't work with std::stringstream yet like the template idea that Kornel posted way back when, the following works and is relatively clean:

#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>


template< typename T >
std::string hexify(T i)
{
    std::stringbuf buf;
    std::ostream os(&buf);


    os << "0x" << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(sizeof(T) * 2)
       << std::hex << i;

    return buf.str().c_str();
}


int someNumber = 314159265;
std::string hexified = hexify< int >(someNumber);
  • 7
    Shouldn't you just return buf.str() ? – ruipacheco Oct 12 '16 at 18:29
2

Just have a look on my solution,[1] that I verbatim copied from my project, so there a German is API doc included. My goal was to combine flexibility and safety within my actual needs:[2]

  • no 0x prefix added: caller may decide
  • automatic width deduction: less typing
  • explicit width control: widening for formatting, (lossless) shrinking to save space
  • capable for dealing with long long
  • restricted to integral types: avoid surprises by silent conversions
  • ease of understanding
  • no hard-coded limit
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iomanip>

/// Vertextet einen Ganzzahlwert val im Hexadezimalformat.
/// Auf die Minimal-Breite width wird mit führenden Nullen aufgefüllt;
/// falls nicht angegeben, wird diese Breite aus dem Typ des Arguments
/// abgeleitet. Funktion geeignet von char bis long long.
/// Zeiger, Fließkommazahlen u.ä. werden nicht unterstützt, ihre
/// Übergabe führt zu einem (beabsichtigten!) Compilerfehler.
/// Grundlagen aus: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5100745/2932052
template <typename T>
inline std::string int_to_hex(T val, size_t width=sizeof(T)*2)
{
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(width) << std::hex << (val|0);
    return ss.str();
}

[1] based on the answer by Kornel Kisielewicz
[2] Translated into the language of CppTest, this is how it reads:

TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(char(0x12)) == "12");
TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(short(0x1234)) == "1234");
TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(long(0x12345678)) == "12345678");
TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex((long long)(0x123456789abcdef0)) == "123456789abcdef0");
TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(0x123, 1) == "123");
TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(0x123, 8) == "00000123");
// with deduction test as suggested by Lightness Races in Orbit:
TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(short(0x12)) == "0012"); 
  • 1
    Could show off the width deduction with e.g. TEST_ASSERT(int_to_hex(short(0x12)) == "0012"); – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 22 '18 at 21:22
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit thanks, added :) – Wolf Jan 8 at 15:04
2

Code for your reference:

#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>
...
string intToHexString(int intValue) {

    string hexStr;

    /// integer value to hex-string
    std::stringstream sstream;
    sstream << "0x"
            << std::setfill ('0') << std::setw(2)
    << std::hex << (int)intValue;

    hexStr= sstream.str();
    sstream.clear();    //clears out the stream-string

    return hexStr;
}
  • 4
    This doesn't really add to the existing answers, and it's pointless to explicitly clear the sstream (it will be destroyed when the function returns on the next line anyway). You could avoid the named hexStr entirely and just return sstream.str(); without clearing and get the same effect, reducing four lines of code to one. – ShadowRanger Feb 18 '16 at 20:28
  • 1
    when purpose of the forum is to understand the things and usage. being verbose is far better to provide clear picture, than saving lines. question was not on optimized code, and answer tries to give a modular-method way of dealing with such conversions. @ShadowRanger – parasrish Feb 19 '16 at 13:18
  • 1
    What is the purpose of sstream.clear();? The sstream object is automatically destroyed at the end of the scope, so return sstream.str(); would do it. – Wolf May 31 '16 at 10:27
  • sstream.clear will just clear the content, before stream ends with scope end (to clear any fail and eof flags with clear). Indeed, when the scope dies, with the life-span of the stream-variable, and therefore sstream.str can be used to return by value. [Reference : cplusplus.com/reference/ios/ios/clear/] – parasrish Jun 1 '16 at 16:46
  • Thanks for the code. Just want I needed! X – TinyRacoon Oct 21 '16 at 15:32
1

I do:

int hex = 10;      
std::string hexstring = stringFormat("%X", hex);  

Take a look at SO answer from iFreilicht and the required template header-file from here GIST!

1

My solution. Only integral types are allowed.

Update. You can set optional prefix 0x in second parameter.

definition.h

#include  <iomanip>
#include <sstream>

template <class T, class T2 = typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type>
static std::string ToHex(const T & data, bool addPrefix = true);



template<class T, class>
inline std::string Convert::ToHex(const T & data, bool addPrefix)
{
    std::stringstream sstream;
    sstream << std::hex;
    std::string ret;
    if (typeid(T) == typeid(char) || typeid(T) == typeid(unsigned char) || sizeof(T)==1)
    {
        sstream << static_cast<int>(data);
        ret = sstream.str();
        if (ret.length() > 2)
        {
            ret = ret.substr(ret.length() - 2, 2);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        sstream << data;
        ret = sstream.str();
    }
    return (addPrefix ? u8"0x" : u8"") + ret;
}

main.cpp

#include <definition.h>
int main()
{
    std::cout << ToHex<unsigned char>(254) << std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<char>(-2) << std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<int>(-2) << std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<long long>(-2) << std::endl;

    std::cout<< std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<unsigned char>(254, false) << std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<char>(-2, false) << std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<int>(-2, false) << std::endl;
    std::cout << ToHex<long long>(-2, false) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Results:
0xfe
0xfe
0xfffffffe
0xfffffffffffffffe

fe
fe fffffffe
fffffffffffffffe

-1

`

char sw(int num){
   char h[16] = {'0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','a','b',' c','d','e','f'};
   return h[num];
}

String to_hexa(int num) {
  int i, j, exp = 0, temp = num;
  String hexa;
  String begin;


  while( temp >= 16 ){
    exp++;
    temp /= 16;
  }

  for ( i = 0; i <= exp; ++i){
    temp = num;
    for ( j = i; j <= exp; ++j){
      if ( j == exp ) hexa += String(sw(temp % 16));
      else temp /= 16;
    }
  }
  begin = "0x";
  for (int i=0; i < 3 - exp; i++){
    begin += "0";
  }  
  return begin + hexa;
}

`

-1
int var = 20;
cout <<                          &var << endl;
cout <<                     (int)&var << endl;
cout << std::hex << "0x" << (int)&var << endl << std::dec; // output in hex, reset back to dec

0x69fec4 (address)
6946500 (address to dec)
0x69fec4 (address to dec, output in hex)


instinctively went with this...
int address = (int)&var;

saw this elsewhere...
unsigned long address = reinterpret_cast(&var);

comment told me this is correct...
int address = (int)&var;

speaking of well covered lightness, where are you at? they're getting too many likes!

  • This question has been well-covered already; what does your answer add to those already posted? And what do addresses have to do with it? – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 22 '18 at 20:34
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit it hasn't been closed has it? did you say that to the last 3 guys who commented? this just gets more to the point for what i was looking for. it might help someone else. and what do addresses have to do with it? who reads addresses in decimal? it's a real example. – Puddle Dec 22 '18 at 20:37
  • Posting the same answer that was already posted almost nine years ago is not deemed useful, and this introduction of pointers to the equation seems to have come out of the blue - the OP doesn't ask about pointers. Furthermore, no, it wouldn't be unsigned long but std::intptr_t. – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 22 '18 at 21:17
  • intptr_t = int... uintptr_t = unsigned int... are memory addresses signed now? and how much memory an int give ya? – Puddle Dec 22 '18 at 21:41
  • You're missing the point. An intptr_t can store any pointer on the build platform; that is not [necessarily] true of unsigned int. And, again, none of this is relevant to the question. No further responses from me – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 22 '18 at 22:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.