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I am redesigning a database scheme in order to improve query performance. In the new design there are 5 (3 used in the example below) tables divided into partitions per month of year (for a total of 860 tables in 172 partitions for the test case). The relevant fields are indexed using the appropriate index type and operator class. The database is populated with simulated data which are reasonable data that can occur in the production environment. The data will be almost never updated, once it´s stored it will only be read.

There are

  • 10M rows in the table measurements
  • 160M rows in the table material_data
  • 40M rows in the table process_data

Hard- and Software configuration:

Windows 10 Professional 64bit
Intel Core i7-4790CPU 
1 TB SATA HDD
16 GB RAM
PostgreSQL 11beta 1

Postgres Configuration (postgresql.conf):

shared_buffers = 512MB
temp_buffers   = 32MB
work_mem       = 32MB
maintenance_work_mem = 1GB

max_worker_processes = 8
max_parallel_workers = 8
max_parallel_workers_per_gather = 2

enable_partition_pruning = on
enable_parallel_append = on
constraint_exclusion = partition
default_statistics_target = 500
effective_cache_size = 12GB

Database schema:

table measurements (10M records total):
id serial
guid TEXT NOT NULL (index: btree, text_pattern_ops)
start TIMESTAMP(0) WITHOUT TIME ZONE NOT NULL (index: btree)
stop TIMESTAMP(0) WITHOUT TIME ZONE NOT NULL 
mount_point_id SMALLINT NOT NULL (index: btree)
name TEXT NOT NULL
comment TEXT NOT NULL
PARTITION BY RANGE (start)

table process_data (40M records total):
id serial
mount_point_id SMALLINT NOT NULL (index:btree)
measurement_id INTEGER NOT NULL (index: btree)
measurement_start TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIME ZONE NOT NULL (index: btree)
item_id SMALLINT NOT NULL (index: btree( item_id, item_value) )
item_value REAL NOT NULL
PARTITION BY RANGE (measurement_start)

table material_data (160M records total):
id serial,
mount_point_id SMALLINT NOT NULL (index: btree)
measurement_id INTEGER NOT NULL  (index: btree)
measurement_start TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIME ZONE NOT NULL (index: btree)
material_index SMALLINT NOT NULL (index: btree)
material_data TEXT NOT NULL (index: btree, text_pattern_ops)
PARTITION BY RANGE (measurement_start)

Table relations:
measurements 1 ---+--- 1..N process_data
                  +--- 1..N material_data
                  +--- 1..N ...

These are the base tables, I provided the index information for clarity. Actually the indexes are applied to the individual partition tables.

partition tables (data given for one partition):
partition_2018_06_measurements: 60K records
partition_2018_06_process_data: 240K record
partition_2018_06_material_data: 950K records

Common queries are:

  • select all measurements in a given interval of time
  • select all measurements with a specific uuid (or part of a uuid)
  • select all measurements having certain process data items
  • select all measurements having certain material_data items

I did some testing with different numbers of measurement records and statistics targets (ranging from 10K to 10M records in the table measurements and statistics targets of 100,250,500,750 and 1000. That´s 20 different scenarios total, and I got comparable results for each scenario, slightly better results with higher statistics targets).

SQL query used for testing:

DROP VIEW IF EXISTS view_measurements;
DROP VIEW IF EXISTS view_material;
DROP VIEW IF EXISTS view_process;

CREATE TEMPORARY VIEW view_measurements AS
(
   SELECT * FROM 
      measurements m 
   WHERE
          m.start BETWEEN '2018-06-01 00:00:00' AND '2018-07-01 00:00:00'
      AND m.mount_point_id IN( 1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15,17,19 )
);

CREATE TEMPORARY VIEW view_material AS
(
   SELECT 
      md.measurement_id, 
      md.material_index, 
      md.material_data 
   FROM 
      material_data md 
   WHERE
      -- exclude as many rows as possible
          md.measurement_start BETWEEN '2018-06-01 00:00:00' AND '2018-07-01 00:00:00'
      AND md.mount_point_id IN( 1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15,17,19 )
      AND (md.material_data LIKE 'SHX%' OR md.material_data LIKE 'CU23%')
);

CREATE TEMPORARY VIEW view_process AS
(
   SELECT 
      pd.measurement_id, 
      pd.item_id, 
      pd.item_value 
   FROM 
      process_data pd
   WHERE
      -- exclude as many rows as possible
          pd.measurement_start BETWEEN '2018-06-01 00:00:00' AND '2018-07-01 00:00:00'
      AND pd.mount_point_id IN( 1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15,17,19 )
      AND pd.item_id IN ( 110, 111 )
);

--EXPLAIN ANALYZE VERBOSE
SELECT
   *
FROM
   view_measurements vm
WHERE
(
  (
    EXISTS( SELECT 1 FROM view_material md WHERE vm.id = md.measurement_id AND md.material_data LIKE 'SHX%' )  OR
    EXISTS( SELECT 1 FROM view_material md WHERE vm.id = md.measurement_id AND md.material_data LIKE 'CU23%' )
  )
  AND
  (
    EXISTS( SELECT 1 FROM view_process pd WHERE vm.id = pd.measurement_id AND pd.item_id = 110 AND pd.item_value > 1700 ) AND
    EXISTS( SELECT 1 FROM view_process pd WHERE vm.id = pd.measurement_id AND pd.item_id = 111 AND pd.item_value > 2.2 )
  )
);

The query above selects all measurements from 01.06.2018 to 01.07.2018 where there is

- a material item starting with 'SHX' or there is an material_item starting with 'CU23' AND
- a process data item with id 110 and value > 1700 AND
- a process data item with id 110 and value > 2.2

for a measurement row. The query returned 18 items.

The above sometime query takes up to 1min from an unprepared database. That seems to be too slow, especially when all data is taken from exactly 3 tables (the interval fits exactly into partition 2018_06). Once the data is loaded into the databases´ cache the query with similar parameters returns in a few hundred milliseconds. I ran the same query against larger partitions (quarters vs month) and the initial query took even longer (2min instead of 1min). The query plan optimizer reveals the query planner´s estimation of rows is 200x/400x smaller than the actual result (item 10 and 11).

I tried CTEs instead of views, but the times were even worse.

  • Is it possible to speed up the query for uncached data?
  • Is there a major flaw in the design that needs to be fixed?
  • Is there a better schema design? Using the schema above the views can be created without joining data from another table, that should be significantly faster.

Thank you in advance, Guido

  • None of the fields in used in view_measurements have an index on them, or did you miss that out? – 404 Jun 25 '18 at 11:50
  • Can I also just say, why are you partitioning? Have you compared the performance without partitioning and verified it's faster with the partitions? I'm tempted to think it would be faster without. – 404 Jun 25 '18 at 11:52
  • Sorry, I forgot to add the indexes for the measurement table. The fields are indexed, of course. I decided to partition data because the query planner can ignore much data by pruning irrelevant data. I did some research beforehand and came to the conclusion that partitioning might help. I´ll test a case without partitioning and will post the results as soon as I am finished. – Guido Niewerth Jun 25 '18 at 12:17
  • A few thoughts. Your number of partitions seems on the high side given the documentation: "All constraints on all partitions of the master table are examined during constraint exclusion, so large numbers of partitions are likely to increase query planning time considerably. Partitioning using these techniques will work well with up to perhaps a hundred partitions; don't try to use many thousands of partitions." (postgresql.org/docs/10/static/ddl-partitioning.html) Second, are you sure the query optimizer is actually only using the partitioned table based on query plan? – Whelchel Jun 25 '18 at 12:26
  • Thanks for your thoughts, Whelchel. I ran some other tests where one partition covers one quarter of a year instead of one month, there were only 43 partitions instead of 172. The query on uncached data took almost 2min instead of 1min with 172 partitions. And no, I am not sure the query planner is using only partitioned tables. The plan analyzer lists two tables "partition_2018_08_xxx" which dont hold any of the requested data. However, I don´t know how to instruct psql not to inspect those tables. – Guido Niewerth Jun 25 '18 at 12:52

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