7

The following code results in an error (Playground)

#![feature(specialization)]

trait Foo {
    type Assoc;
    fn foo(&self) -> &Self::Assoc;
}

default impl<T> Foo for T {
    type Assoc = T;
    fn foo(&self) -> &Self::Assoc {
        self
    }
}

Error:

error[E0308]: mismatched types
  --> src/main.rs:20:9
   |
20 |         self
   |         ^^^^ expected associated type, found type parameter
   |
   = note: expected type `&<T as Foo>::Assoc`
              found type `&T`

This is strange since <T as Foo>::Assoc is T, so it should work. Stranger even: when I remove the default keyword from the impl, it works (but of course, in my real code, I need to mark the impl as default).

The same error happens when providing default values in the trait definition (Playground):

#![feature(specialization)]
#![feature(associated_type_defaults)]

trait Foo {
    type Assoc = Self;
    fn foo(&self) -> &Self::Assoc {
        self
    }
}

What's going on here? Is this a compiler bug? Or -- and that's why I'm asking this question -- does this error make sense because there is something special about specialization that I haven't understood yet? In case this is a bug, mem::transmute is surely safe, riiiight?

  • 1
    The first example runs in the playground. The second one should fail, since you could write impl Foo for String { type Assoc = i32; } – trentcl Jun 25 '18 at 14:17
  • @trentcl I'm sorry, the first playground link was wrong :( I just fixed it. Now it has the same code as in my question and doesn't compile. Good point about the second example! – Lukas Kalbertodt Jun 25 '18 at 14:20
  • 1
    In the 'default impl' tracking issue it says: "all items in a default impl are (implicitly) default and hence specializable" I guess, this means marking an impl as default also turns associated types into specializable default types - regardless of whether the associated_type_defaults feature is enabled. In this case it makes sense that the first example should fail for the same reason as the second example. – Calculator Jun 25 '18 at 15:30
5

The Specialization feature is showing no signs of stabilising, mostly because of soundness concerns, so you should expect some problems.

You have this:

#![feature(specialization)]

trait Foo {
    type Assoc;
    fn foo(&self) -> &Self::Assoc;
}

default impl<T> Foo for T {
    type Assoc = T;
    fn foo(&self) -> &Self::Assoc {
        self
    }
}

But imagine that you added another implementation with its own associated type but without implementing foo. This implementation's foo will be "inherited" from the other, less specific, implementation:

impl<T: SomeConstraint> Foo for T {
    type Assoc = NotT;
}

Then there'd be a problem. Your foo would be returning a T but, whenever T is SomeConstraint there'd be a type mismatch because it should be returning a NotT.

RFC 2532 — associated type defaults mentions a possible solution in its Future Work section. A hypothetical default block could be used to indicate that associated type(s) and method(s) would need to be specialized together. There's no sign of when such a feature would be considered for inclusion, however.

  • Oh snap, that's possible? I would have assumed that the compiler would complain about the second impl. Mh so I guess the feature is even less stable than I thought... Thanks! – Lukas Kalbertodt Jun 25 '18 at 15:16

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