17

I have a flutter project that i am working on i cant put the whole code cause its more than 500 lines of code so i will try to ask my question as simply as i acn using the imp. section of the code .

i am having a stateful widget and having some functions inside that stateful widget under the class that extends extends State<MusicPlayer>

file lib\main.dart

just take a simple function like

class MyAppState extends State<MyApp>{
...
void printSample (){
  print("Sample text");
}
...

this function is inside the stateful widget inside main class .

there is another file lib\MyApplication.dart

this file also has a stateful widget can i do something so that i can call the function printSample() here ..

class MyApplicationState extends State<MyApplication>{
...
@override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return new FlatButton(
      child: new Text("Print Sample Text"),
      onPressed :(){
       // i want to cal the function here how is it possible to call the 
       // function 
       // printSample()  from here??  
      }
    );
  }
...
}
  • Possible duplicate of Trigger a function from a widget to a State object – Rémi Rousselet Jun 25 '18 at 18:22
  • If you can ensure one widget is a descendant of another, you can use InheritedWidget – Jacob Phillips Jun 25 '18 at 18:27
  • @JacobPhillips Just use context.ancestorStateOfType in that situation – Rémi Rousselet Jun 25 '18 at 18:31
  • @RémiRousselet I need Just a little more help here i am trying to send data from a child widget to a parent widget and all the examples of stream and listenable do the opposite and thats what exactly my problem is . I want to call a function from say a child widget to a parent widget sorry for not mentioning that above .. – Aman Malhotra Jun 25 '18 at 19:58
  • Pass the entire StreamController to your child instead of just Stream if your child should submit events too. – Rémi Rousselet Jun 25 '18 at 20:01
26

To call a function of a parent, you can use the callback pattern. In this example, a function (onColorSelected) is passed to the child. The child calls the function when a button is pressed:

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

class Parent extends StatefulWidget {
  @override
  State<StatefulWidget> createState() {
    return ParentState();
  }
}

class ParentState extends State<Parent> {
  Color selectedColor = Colors.grey;

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Column(
      children: <Widget>[
        Container(
          color: selectedColor,
          height: 200.0,
        ),
        ColorPicker(
          onColorSelect: (Color color) {
            setState(() {
              selectedColor = color;
            });
          },
        )
      ],
    );
  }
}

class ColorPicker extends StatelessWidget {
  const ColorPicker({this.onColorSelect});

  final ColorCallback onColorSelect;

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Row(
      children: <Widget>[
        RaisedButton(
          child: Text('red'),
          color: Colors.red,
          onPressed: () {
            onColorSelect(Colors.red);
          },
        ),
        RaisedButton(
          child: Text('green'),
          color: Colors.green,
          onPressed: () {
            onColorSelect(Colors.green);
          },
        ),
        RaisedButton(
          child: Text('blue'),
          color: Colors.blue,
          onPressed: () {
            onColorSelect(Colors.blue);
          },
        )
      ],
    );
  }
}

typedef ColorCallback = void Function(Color color);

Internal Flutter widgets like buttons or form fields use exactly the same pattern. If you only want to call a function without any arguments, you can use the VoidCallback type instead defining your own callback type.


If you want to notify a higher up parent, you can just repeat this pattern on every hierarchy level:

class ColorPickerWrapper extends StatelessWidget {
  const ColorPickerWrapper({this.onColorSelect});

  final ColorCallback onColorSelect;

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Padding(
      padding: EdgeInsets.all(20.0),
      child: ColorPicker(onColorSelect: onColorSelect),
    )
  }
}

Calling a method of child widget from a parent widget is discouraged in Flutter. Instead, Flutter encourages you to pass down the state of a child as constructor parameters. Instead of calling a method of the child, you just call setState in the parent widget to update its children.


One alternative approach are the controller classes in Flutter (ScrollController, AnimationController, ...). These are also passed to the children as constructor parameters, and they contain methods to control the state of the child without calling setState on the parent. Example:

scrollController.animateTo(200.0, duration: Duration(seconds: 1), curve: Curves.easeInOut);

The children are then required to listen to these changes to update their internal state. Of course, you can also implement your own controller class. If you need to, I recommend you to look at the source code of Flutter to understand how that works.


Futures and streams are another alternative to pass down state, and could also be used to call a function of a child.

But I really don't recommend it. If you need to call a method of a child widget, it is very like that your application architecture is flawed. Try to move the state up to the common ancestor!

  • 1
    "Calling a method of child widget from a parent widget is discouraged" is it discouraged even if called via a GlobalKey?? – Mohamed Selim Mar 2 at 22:42
  • Bit Complicated !! – jrhamza Mar 11 at 11:15
2

I found another solution by trial-and-error, but it worked.

import 'main.dart' as main;

Then add this line under the onPressed.

main.MyAppState().printSample();
2

if you want to call printSample() func you can use:

class Myapp extends StatefulWidget{
...
    MyappState myAppState=new MyappState();
    @override
    MyappState createState() => myAppState;
    void printSample(){
        myAppState.printSample();
    }
}
class MyAppState extends State<MyApp>{
    void printSample (){
        print("Sample text");
    }
}

...............
Myapp _myapp = new Myapp();
myapp.printSample();
...
  • 1
    I don't think this is valid for a more complex case: The Myapp StatefulWidget can be constructed repeatedly and therefore the state that any given instance holds may not be the same state object that Flutter holds and associates with the tree, right? – Pat Niemeyer Apr 2 at 22:50
  • 1
    This helped me to fix my issue, thank boss! – Sachintha Udara May 30 at 5:52

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