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I'd like to be able to write raw machine code, without assembly or any other sort of higher level language, that can be put directly onto a flash drive and run. I already know that for this to work, I need to format master boot record headers (which I have managed to do manually) onto the drive. I have completed this, and successfully been able to get a line of text to display on the screen using assembly code in the first sector (in this case, the first 512 bytes) of the drive my code is on. However, I would like to be able to write raw hex code onto the drive, like I did for MBR formatting, without any sort of tool like assembly to help me. I know that there is a way to do this, but I haven't really been able to find anything that doesn't mention assembly. Where can I find information about this? Googling machine code or x86 programming comes up with assembly, which isn't what I want.

  • the intel documentation has both the assembly and the machine code side by side. you are welcome to write a file directly with just machine code. It isnt really relevant to any kind of problem or solution it just makes for more work for the sake of more work. there is some education to writing an assembler from which you understand the nuances of the machine code, but that is a completely separate project from having a binary file for some use case. – old_timer Jun 26 '18 at 19:20
  • If you are not able to find the machine code then you really arent looking, it is hard to not find it. and it is pretty much going to always be shown side by side with its assembly counterpart because that is what makes it readable. you can use either side of the document the asm through an assembler or the machine code directly. your choice. you use the assembler you need to find a tool or set of tools or make some tools to get the final binary format you want, you use the machine code without assembler you do it all, the tool to generate the machine code as well as the output file. – old_timer Jun 26 '18 at 19:22
  • From your question it appears you are not ready for the task of generating machine code much less using that output for something...Take one step at a time. – old_timer Jun 26 '18 at 19:23
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If what you really want is to understand x86 machine code better, I'd recommend you start by looking at the output of an assembler to see what bytes it assembled into the output file for each line of asm source.

nasm -fbin -l listing.txt foo.asm will gives you a listing that includes the raw hex bytes and the source line, or nasm -fbin -l/dev/stdout foo.asm | less pipes the listing right into a text-viewer. See this chroma-key blend function in 13 bytes of x86 machine code I wrote on codegolf.SE for an example of what the output looks like.

You can also disassemble a binary file after creating it normally. ndisasm works on flat binaries, and produces the same format of hex bytes + asm instruction. Other disassemblers like objdump are also usable: Disassembling A Flat Binary File Using objdump.

Semi-related: How to turn hex code into x86 instructions


Intel's x86 manuals fully specify how instructions are encoded: See the vol.2 insn set reference manual, Chapter 2 INSTRUCTION FORMAT for a breakdown of prefixes, opcodes, ModR/M + optional SIB and optional displacement, and immediate.

Given that, you can read the per-instruction documentation on how to encode it, like that D1 /4 (shl r/m32, 1) means the opcode byte is D1, and the /r field of ModRM must be 4. (The /r field works as 3 additional opcode bits for some instructions.)

There's also an appendix mapping opcode-bytes back to instructions, and other sections in that manual.

You can of course use a hex editor to type in the encodings you work out manually to create a 512-byte binary file without using an assembler. But this is a pointless exercise.


See also tips for golfing in x86 machine code for a lot of quirks of x86 instruction encoding: e.g. there are single-byte encodings for inc/dec a full register (except in 64-bit mode). It's of course focused on instruction length, but unless you insist on looking up the actual encodings yourself, the interesting part is which forms of instructions have different or special encodings available. Several of the answers on that tips Q&A have output from objdump -d showing machine-code bytes and AT&T syntax disassembly.

6

Just to paint the picture...

First off you are not going to find a how to program in machine code, that doesn't have assembly associated with it and that should be obvious. Any decent instruction reference of which most you will find contain the assembly for some assembler along with the machine code, because you really need some way to reference some bit pattern and assembly language is that language.

So look up nop for example you find the bit patter 10010000 or 0x90. So if I want to add the instruction nop to my program I add the byte 0x90. So even if you go back to very early processors you still desired to program in assembly language and hand assemble with pencil and paper then use dip switches to clock the program into memory before trying to run it. Because it just makes sense. Decades later even to demonstrate machine code programming, particularly with a painful instruction set like x86, you start with assembly, assemble, then dissassemble, then talk about it, so here goes:

top:
    mov ah,01h
    jmp one
    nop
    nop
one:
    add ah,01h
    jmp two
two:
    mov bx,1234h
    nop
    jmp three
    jmp three
    jmp three
three:
    nop
    jmp top

nasm -f aout so.s -o so.elf
objdump -D so.elf

00000000 <top>:
   0:   b4 01                   mov    $0x1,%ah
   2:   eb 02                   jmp    6 <one>
   4:   90                      nop
   5:   90                      nop

00000006 <one>:
   6:   80 c4 01                add    $0x1,%ah
   9:   eb 00                   jmp    b <two>

0000000b <two>:
   b:   66 bb 34 12             mov    $0x1234,%bx
   f:   90                      nop
  10:   eb 04                   jmp    16 <three>
  12:   eb 02                   jmp    16 <three>
  14:   eb 00                   jmp    16 <three>

00000016 <three>:
  16:   90                      nop
  17:   eb e7                   jmp    0 <top>

so just the first couple of instructions describe the problem and why asm makes so much sense...

The first one you can easily program in machine code b4 01 mov ah,01h we go into the overloaded instruction mov in the documentation and find immediate operand to register. 1011wreg data we have one byte so it is not a word so the word bit is not set, we have to look up reg to find ah end up with b4 and the immediate is 01h. Not that bad, but now jump I want to jump over some stuff, well how much stuff? Which jump do I want to use? Do I want to be conservative and use the fewest byte one?

I can see that I want to jump over two instructions we can easily look up the nops to know they are one byte, 0x90, instructions. so intra-segment direct short should work as the assembler chose. 0xEB but what is the offset? 0x02 to jump over the two BYTES of instructions between where I am and where I want to go.

So you can go through the rest of the instructions I have assembled here from the intel documentation to see what and why the assembler chose those bytes.

Now I am looking at the intel 8086/8088 manual right now, the intra-segment direct short instruction comments on sign extended, the intra-segment direct does not say sign extended, although the processor at this time was 16 bits but you had a few more bits of segment so by only reading the manual, having no access to the design engineers, and using no debugged assembler for reference, how would I know if I could have used the 16 bit direct jump for that last instruction that is branching backward? In this case the assembler chose the byte sized offset, but what if...

Im using a 16 bit manual but 32/64 bit tools, so I have to consider that, but I could and did do this:

three:
    nop
db 0xe9,0xe7,0xff,0xff,0xff

instead of jmp top.

00000016 <three>:
  16:   90                      nop
  17:   e9 e7 ff ff ff          jmp    3 <top+0x3>

for 8086 that would have been 0xe9,0xe7,0xff

   db 0xb4,0x01
   db 0xeb,0x02
   db 0x90
   db 0x90

so now what if I wanted to change one of the nops being jumped over to a mov

   db 0xb4,0x01
   db 0xeb,0x02
   db 0xb4,0x11
   db 0x90

but its broken now I have to fix the jump

   db 0xb4,0x01
   db 0xeb,0x03
   db 0xb4,0x11
   db 0x90

Now change that to an add

   db 0xb4,0x01
   db 0xeb,0x03
   db 0x80,0xc4,0x01
   db 0x90

Now I have to change the jump again

   db 0xb4,0x01
   db 0xeb,0x04
   db 0x80,0xc4,0x01
   db 0x90

But had I programmed that jmp one in assembly language I don't have to deal with that the assembler does it. It gets worse when your jump is right on that cusp of the distance then you say have some other jumps within that loop, you have to go through the code several times to see if any of those other jumps are 2 or 3 or 4 bytes, and does that push my longer jumps over the edge from one byte to another

a:
...
jmp x
...
jmp a
...
x:

as we pass jump x do we allocate 2 bytes for it? then get to jmp a, allocate two bytes for it as well and at that point we may have figured out all the rest of the instructions between jmp a and a: and it just fits in a two byte jump. but then eventually we get to x: to find that jmp x needs to be 3 bytes, that pushes the jmp a too far now it has to be a three byte jmp, which means we have to go back to jmp x and adjust for the additional byte from jmp a being three bytes now instead of the assumed 2.

The assembler does all off this for you, if you want to program machine code directly first and formost how are you going to keep track of the hundreds of different instructions without some natural language notes to keep track?

So I can do this

    mov ah,01h
top:
    add ah,01h
    nop
    nop
    jmp top

then

nasm so.s -o so
hexdump -C so
00000000  b4 01 80 c4 01 90 90 eb  f9                       
|.........|
00000009

Or I can do this:

#include <stdio.h>
unsigned char data[]={0xb4,0x01,0x80,0xc4,0x01,0x90,0x90,0xeb,0xf9};
int main ( void )
{
    FILE *fp;
    fp=fopen("out.bin","wb");
    if(fp==NULL) return(1);
    fwrite(data,1,sizeof(data),fp);
    fclose(fp);
}

I want to add a nop to the loop:

    mov ah,01h
top:
    add ah,01h
    nop
    nop
    nop
    jmp top

vs

#include <stdio.h>
unsigned char data[]={0xb4,0x01,0x80,0xc4,0x01,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xeb,0xf8};
int main ( void )
{
    FILE *fp;
    fp=fopen("out.bin","wb");
    if(fp==NULL) return(1);
    fwrite(data,1,sizeof(data),fp);
    fclose(fp);
}

If I was really trying to write in machine code I would have to do something like this:

unsigned char data[]={
0xb4,0x01, //top:
0x80,0xc4,0x01, //add ah,01h
0x90, //nop
0x90, //nop
0x90, //nop
0xeb,0xf8 //jmp top
};

To remain sane. There are some instruction sets I have used and made for myself for fun and were easier to program in machine code, but still better done with comments in pseudocode using assembly mnemonics...

If your goal is to simply end up with some blob of machine code in some format, bare metal or other not some Windows or Linux file format program, you use assembly language and in one or two steps of the toolchain you get from the assembly source to the binary machine code result. Worst case you write an ad hoc program to get from the output of the toolchain, and manipulate those bits into other bits. You don't toss out the tools available to write raw bits at the end by hand, you just reformat the output file format.

  • Good answer, nice examples, but nasm -f aout is a weird choice (the a.out object file format has been obsolete for about 2 decades). If you just want something that objdump can disassemble without additional options (unlike a raw binary), nasm -felf32 is a good choice. – Peter Cordes Jun 27 '18 at 5:20
  • @PeterCordes Yep, agreed, went with the first one that worked, didnt go back and switch to elf explicitly. – old_timer Jun 27 '18 at 11:43
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In Python you can use the subprocess module and hexdump.py a Public Domain Program created by anatoly techtonik techtonik@gmail.com it is the best for taking any compiled language type and fetching both the raw machine code and asm in full text.

Second is Pelles C. at version 9.0 C11-17 In Pelles you simply have to debug a second time after debugging once. It spits out both the machine code and asm code for you. It is nice but you cannot copy and paste the code. You can see it all but if you want it you have to manually type it out.

Both are used for Developing New Programming Languages. Mainly because you can see instructions dead on as you build your Lexical Analyzer and set machine instructions by it.

My take on writing raw machine is this--> If you make a mistake you loose any kind of fatal error detection or conditional try catch to debug or check it first before it goes through and damages things in your machine.

That is precisely why we have Computer Languages. And it is much better to use either C or C++ inline ASM methods to test things out before jumping into writing raw code. And you will need the x86 instruction set found here.

x86 Instruction Sets Keep it safe anyways.

-1

http://ref.x86asm.net/coder32.html

While i really don't geht, why you would.do this.

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