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My table xm_c is created like this:

CREATE TABLE `xm_c` (  
  `category_id` char(16) NOT NULL default '',  
  `label` char(64) NOT NULL default '',  
  `flags` smallint(5) unsigned default NULL,  
  `d0` date default NULL,  
  `d1` date default NULL,  
  `ct` int(6) unsigned default NULL,  
  `t_update` timestamp NOT NULL default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,  
   PRIMARY KEY  (`category_id`),  
  **FULLTEXT KEY `label` (`label`)**  
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 DELAY_KEY_WRITE=1;  

The FULLTEXT index is NOT used in the query below:
select * from xm_c where label = 'TomCruise';

where as it is used here:
select * from xm_c where MATCH(label) AGAINST('TomCruise');


mysql> explain select * from xm_c where MATCH(label) AGAINST('TomCruise');  

> 
 id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra   
**1 | SIMPLE      | xm_c  | fulltext | label     | label | 0      |      |    1 | Using where** 




mysql> explain select * from xm_c where label = 'TomCruise';  

> id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows    | Extra  
**1 | SIMPLE      | xm_c  | ALL  | label         | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 5673360 | Using where** 



Can someone explain this? Shouldn't the INDEX be used in both the queries?
Is there a syntax constraint in using FULLTEXT INDICES?

2

A full text index can only be used in MATCH() ... AGAINST operations. An = operator is very different and has nothing to do with fts, it just can't use this type of index. More information about fts can be found in the manual.

A horse uses horseshoes, a car uses tyres. And both can bring you from A to B.

  • Thank you for the answer. As I understand it, an index is created for a column or group of columns to enable faster search. So shouldn't the index for the corresponding column be used for any search involving that column? – raghu Mar 7 '11 at 12:01
  • no, because the full text index splits text into words and that would mean matching a word (seen as a part of the text) and than matching the actual text as well to check it is equal (as in the whole text)... your case where the whole text and the word are the same is just a corner case, the plan is made generally – xception May 21 at 8:21

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