3

From the bash software manual:

${parameter/pattern/string}

The pattern is expanded to produce a pattern just as in filename expansion. Parameter is expanded and the longest match of pattern against its value is replaced with string.
... If pattern begins with ‘%’, it must match at the end of the expanded value of parameter.

And so I've tried:

local new_name=${file/%old/new}

Where string is an absolute file path (/abc/defg/hij and old and new are variable strings.

However this seems to be trying to match the literal %sb1.

What is the syntax for this?

Expected Output:

Given

old=sb1
new=sb2

Then

/foo/sb1/foo/bar/sb1 should become /foo/sb1/foo/bar/sb2

/foo/foosb1other/foo/bar/foosb1bar should become /foo/foosb1other/foo/bar/foosb2bar

1
  • @anubhava quickly changed the requirements there as I realized what I really needed, though it would be useful for it to work with literals too. Jun 26 '18 at 14:45
3

Using only shell-builtin parameter expansion:

src=sb1; dest=sb2
old=/foo/foosb1other/foo/bar/foosb1bar

if [[ $old = *"$src"* ]]; then
  prefix=${old%"$src"*}                  # Extract content before the last instance
  suffix=${old#"$prefix"}                # Extract content *after* our prefix
  new=${prefix}${suffix/"$src"/"$dest"}  # Append unmodified prefix w/ suffix w/ replacement
else
  new=$old
fi

declare -p new >&2

...properly emits:

declare -- new="/foo/foosb1other/foo/bar/foosb2bar"
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.