I've created a validator that checks if digit is a number and makes sure there are 2 digits allowed after a decimal place. What this doesn't cover is a number that is either 6 digits with no decimal places (123456) or 8 digits with 2 decimal places (123456.78). This is what I came up with

function validateInt2Dec(value, min, max) {

    if (Math.sign(value) === -1) {
        var negativeValue = true;
        value = -value
    }

    if (!value) {
        return true;
    }
    var format = /^\d+\.?\d{0,2}$/.test(value);
    if (format) {
        if (value < min || value > max) {
            format = false;
        }
    }
    return format;
}

and its implementation in formly form

     vm.fields = [
             {
                className: 'row',
                fieldGroup: [
                    {
                        className: 'col-xs-6',
                        key: 'payment',
                        type: 'input',
                        templateOptions: {
                            label: 'Payment',
                            required: false,
                            maxlength: 8
                        },
                        validators: {
                            cost: function(viewValue, modelValue, scope) {
                                var value = modelValue || viewValue;
                                return validateInt2Dec(value);
                            }
                        }
                    }
                ]
            }
        ];

What do I have to add to cover above scenario?

  • Would it be wrong to add the missing ".00" (no decimal point), "00" (decimal point at the end) or "0" (decimal point has one following digit) before testing? – Andrew Morton Jun 26 at 15:37
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try regex below.

var regex = /^\d{1,6}(\.\d{1,2})?$/;

console.log(regex.test("123456"));
console.log(regex.test("123456.78"));
console.log(regex.test("123456.00"));
console.log(regex.test("12345.00"));
console.log(regex.test("12345.0"));
console.log(regex.test("12345.6"));
console.log(regex.test("12.34"));
console.log(regex.test("123456.789"));

  • 123456.00 is a correct combination. It has 6 digits and 2 digits after decimal point. 1234567 would have been incorrect or 123456.123. I only allow 9 characters in that field so it's not going to allow user to enter 123456.123 anyway but 123456.00 should be accepted. – LazioTibijczyk Jun 27 at 8:57
  • @LazioTibijczyk I saw your comment that "123456.00" looks incorrect. I've updated my regex - is it what you're looking for? – barbsan Jun 27 at 9:03
  • Looks fine to me. Tested and works as expected. Thank you. – LazioTibijczyk Jun 27 at 9:14
  • You're welcome. If "123456." (dot as last character) is also correct you may want to change that regex to /^\d{1,6}(\.\d{0,2})?$/ – barbsan Jun 27 at 9:19
  • No, no. It's absolutely fine. 123456. is incorrect. – LazioTibijczyk Jun 27 at 9:34

Trying this out on regex101 seems to fit you criteria.

Solution: ^(\d{6})?(\d{8}\.\d{2})?$

  • Group 1 ^(\d{6})?- either 6 digits

  • Group 2 ^(\d{6})?(\d{8}\.\d{2})?$ - or 8 digits with 2 decimal place

  • Doesn't allow any other numbers than 6 or 8 digits. – LazioTibijczyk Jun 26 at 15:44
  • Here's the same regex without grouping ^(?:\d{6}|\d{8}\.\d{2})$ – m8r1x Jun 26 at 15:57
  • does not match any number with two decimal places and < 8 digits on left side – Devin Fields Jun 26 at 16:12
  • @m8r1x accepts only 6 and 8 digits numbers. No shorter or longer. Also 123456.00 looks incorrect – LazioTibijczyk Jun 27 at 8:40

If you don't want to add additional regex complexity, what you can do is make an additional check of maxLength before finally giving it a pass

var str = value.toFixed(2);
var maxLength = (str.indexOf(".") > -1 ? 8 : 6);
if (str.length > maxLength) {
    return; //invalid input
}
  • 1
    This allows numbers such as 324.3454 – LazioTibijczyk Jun 26 at 15:48
  • Good catch! I fixed it by changing it to value.toFixed(2).toString() which takes care of additional decimal places. – Prahlad Yeri Jun 26 at 19:44
  • I also noticed that toFixed() returns string itself, so the additional string conversion also isn't required. – Prahlad Yeri Jun 26 at 19:46
  • TypeError: Cannot read property 'toFixed' of undefined AND TypeError: value.toFixed is not a function – LazioTibijczyk Jun 27 at 8:01
  • Number.prototype.ToFixed is valid in ES6. As long as your value is a Number, it should be able to work. If you are passing an undefined, you should check that before passing it to this function. – Prahlad Yeri Jun 28 at 6:43

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