5

I have files that I would like to divide into substrings in a "sliding window" manner, in increments of 1 character. The files have only one line each, and I can print the substrings like this:

input="file.txt"
awk '{print substr($1,1,21)}' $input


awk '{print substr($1,2,21)}' $input

which give me the following output, respectively.

AATAAGGTGCCTGATTAAA-G   
ATAAGGTGCCTGATTAAA-GG

The input file contains about 17k characters and I managed to try and do a for loop to count the characters and try the above command within the for loop, like this:

count=`wc -c ${input} |cut -d' ' -f1`
for num in `seq ${count}`
   do
awk '{print substr($1,$num,21)}' $input
   done

But this returns empty outputs. I also wanted to run it as a bash scripts with the input and the size of the substrings and output file specified in the command line like:

script.sh input_file.txt 21 output.txt

And I tried this, but it also didn't work.

  input=$1
  kmer=$2
  output=$3
  count=`wc -c ${input} |cut -d' ' -f1`
  for num in `seq ${count}`
    do
 awk '{print substr($1,$num,$kmer)}' $input > $output
  done

Any tips on what I am doing wrong? I am pretty new to awk...

5
  • Just out of curiosity, why do you want to do this? I'm trying to imagine a tool that would use the end result that wouldn't be able to do the extraction itself. Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 19:28
  • I didn't look too closely but I do see one problem. Bash doesn't expand variables inside single quotes, so it won't expand $num. Try awk "{print substr(\$1,$num,21)}". Also, I'm not sure if you need to escape the {} or not.
    – ccarton
    Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 19:30
  • Calling awk 17k times will be painfully slow. I recommend using substring expansion or invoking awk just one and let it handle everything :)
    – PesaThe
    Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 19:33
  • I don't know enough awk to answer, but would you consider using a different language. Python for example? Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 19:39
  • That is what I thought PesaThe, i am just not sure how to do that. Also, it looks like awk doesn't like when I awk "{print substr(\$1,$num,21)}" Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 19:42

5 Answers 5

3
#!/usr/bin/env bash 

input=$1
kmer=$2
output=$3

data=$(<"$input")

for ((i=0;i<${#data};i++)); do
    echo "${data:i:kmer}"
done > "$output"

It uses only substring expansion, quoting from manual:

${parameter:offset:length}

This is referred to as Substring Expansion. It expands to up to length characters of the value of parameter starting at the character specified by offset.


Using gawk:

awk -v num="$kmer" '{for(i=1;i<=length($0);i++) print substr($0,i,num)}' "$input" > "$output"

This is a much faster solution. The speed difference is significant: Tested on 17k characters and a 30-char window: ~10s for the first solution, ~0.01s for the second solution.

1
  • 1
    this is exactly what I needed. Commented Jun 26, 2018 at 19:49
1

You can also do this with the GNU sed, as follows:

echo -n "123456789" | sed -r ':loop h;s/.//3g;p;x; s/.//; t loop'
12
23 
34
45
56
67
78
89 
9

3g is the "sliding window" size + 1.

to process data in a file instead of STDIN, just specify it after the sed command:

sed -r ':loop h;s/.//3g;p;x; s/.//; t loop' myfile
1
  • It's surprisingly slow but I really like that creative use of sed, +1 :)
    – PesaThe
    Commented Jun 27, 2018 at 8:11
1

Regarding your specific problem, the snippet:

awk '{print substr($1,$num,21)}' $input

has an issue in that the stuff inside the single quotes is not subject to shell variable expansion. This can be seen with:

pax$ num=42 && echo '$num'
$num
pax$ num=42 && echo "$num"
42

Hence $num will not be replaced the the value of the shell variable.

As can also be seen above, you can use double quotes which will allow expansion, but then you need to escape $1 to prevent its expansion. I usually find it easier to turn shell variables into awk variables, along the lines of:

awk -vnum=$num '{print substr($1,num,21)}' $input

The following snippet shows this in operation:

pax$ num=42 && awk 'END{print $num}' </dev/null

pax$ num=42 && awk -v num=$num 'END{print num}' </dev/null
42

However, 17,000 invocations of an external program is going to be rather inefficient, you would be better off compiling something or, if you must use scripting, it can be done entirely in bash itself. The code below shows how you can do this, the important bit is within the time ( ) block, everything else is just setting up test data, timing and cleaning up.

# Create test data.

(
    for i in {1..1000} ; do
        echo -n "abcdefghijklmnop-"
    done
) >inputdata.txt

# Time the execution.

time (
    char17k="$(cat inputdata.txt)"
    echo ${#char17k}
    for ((i = 0; i < ${#char17k}; i++)) ; do
        echo ${char17k:i:21}
    done

)

# Clean up.

rm -rf inputdata.txt

On my system, this completes in about ten seconds. Time taken for 17,000 awk invocations is about three times that, even without doing any useful work:

pax$ time (for in in {1..17000} ; do awk '{}' </dev/null ; done )
real    0m30.649s
user    0m5.196s
sys     0m4.848s

You can, of course, get even more speed by letting awk do all the work. Replacing the contents of the time ( ) block in the above code with:

awk '{for (i = 1; i < length($0); i++) {print substr($0, i, 21)}}' inputdata.txt

gives the much more impressive (about a tenth of a second):

real    0m0.121s
user    0m0.008s
sys     0m0.016s
0
$ echo {1..9} | tr -d ' ' |   # create test data
  awk -v len=3 '{n=length($0); for(i=1;i<=n-len+1;i++) print substr($0,i,len)}'

123
234
345
456
567
678
789
1
  • I'm in review and did not downvote you but, if it were me, it's because you are only blurting out code with no explanation which makes your answer useless and pointless and not following the purpose of Stack Overflow. stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer
    – Rob
    Commented Jun 27, 2018 at 2:46
0

Care for an entry in perl?

#! /bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $data;
my $offset = 0;
my $window = shift or die "Use: $0 {windowSize} [ < ] infile [ > outfile ]\n";

{ local $/;
  $data = <>;
}

print "$_\n" while $_ = substr $data, $offset++, $window;

exit;

Could squish to a one-liner, but even using strict and warnings &c...

$: wc -c src
17000 src

$: time ./slide 21 src
!"#$%&'()*+,-./012345
"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456
#$%&'()*+,-./01234567
$%&'()*+,-./012345678

. . .

WXYZ[\
XYZ[\
YZ[\
Z[\
[\
\

real    0m0.029s
user    0m0.004s
sys     0m0.021s

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