19

C++11 includes the algorithm std::partition_point(). However for all the cases I have tried it gives the same answer as std::lower_bound(). The only difference being the convenient T& value parameter.

Did I miss something or are these two functions doing more or less the same thing?

  • 1
    You have tried to read e.g. this std::partition_point reference and this std::lower_bound reference? There are some (subtle I'll admit) differences in regards to the predicate. – Some programmer dude Jun 26 '18 at 19:31
  • 2
    one is unary predicate and the other is binary predicate. i guess these little differences merited a seperate function – Ankur S Jun 26 '18 at 19:35
  • Another difference is that std::partition_point doesn't require the range to be ordered, while std::lower_bound does. – Some programmer dude Jun 26 '18 at 19:42
  • 1
    i think both require it to be partitioned while ordered is a subset of partitioned – Ankur S Jun 26 '18 at 19:43
  • @Someprogrammerdude I don't think that is required. From what I can tell all it requires it needs to be partitioned. For instance this seems to work: wandbox.org/permlink/q4WljInrpwK2POfo – NathanOliver Jun 26 '18 at 19:55
13

They are basically equivalent. This would be a valid implementation of lower_bound:

template <typename ForwardIterator, typename T>
ForwardIterator lower_bound(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last,
    T const& value)
{
    return partition_point(first, last, [&](auto&& elem) {
        return elem < value;
    });
}

template <typename ForwardIterator, typename T, typename Compare>
ForwardIterator lower_bound(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last,
    T const& value, Compare comp)
{
    return partition_point(first, last, [&](auto&& elem) {
        return comp(elem, value);
    });
}

The two algorithms rely upon finding the partition point of a partitioned range, they just take different arguments with which to search (a unary predicate for partition_point, vs a value or value and binary predicate for lower_bound).

We just typically think of lower_bound in the context of sorted range with a binary predicate - even though a fully sorted range with respect to such a predicate is not a requirement for that algorithm.


While we're at it, upper_bound can also be implemented in terms of partition_point, just with the operands flipped and the predicate negated:

template <typename ForwardIterator, typename T>
ForwardIterator upper_bound(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last,
    T const& value)
{
    return partition_point(first, last, [&](auto&& elem) {
        return !(value < elem);
    });
}

template <typename ForwardIterator, typename T, typename Compare>
ForwardIterator upper_bound(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last,
    T const& value, Compare comp)
{
    return partition_point(first, last, [&](auto&& elem) {
        return !comp(value, elem);
    });
}

It's weird how differently the two are worded.

lower_bound returns (the upper_bound wording is similar):

The furthermost iterator i in the range [first, last] such that for every iterator j in the range [first, i) the following corresponding conditions hold: *j < value or comp(*j, value) != false.

while partition_point returns

An iterator mid such that all_­of(first, mid, pred) and none_­of(mid, last, pred) are both true.

Those phrases are equivalent since the requirement is that the range is partitioned. But it sure doesn't seem that way at first glance.

| improve this answer | |
  • Is there any reasons your lambdas don't just use a default-capture &? Also, why does your lambda instead capture comp by value, is it guaranteed to be copyable? You could handle std::binary_search() too to make a clean sweep. Anyway, nice answer. – Deduplicator Jun 26 '18 at 22:42
  • @Deduplicator I have no idea why I did that - there is no such requirement as far as I can tell. – Barry Jun 26 '18 at 23:52
  • Oh, I'm not sure adding const to the forwarded argument is actually allowed. There's even an active issue about it: cplusplus.github.io/LWG/lwg-active.html#3031 – Deduplicator Jun 28 '18 at 14:03
  • @Deduplicator That's about the arguments to the comparison itself. I'm not sure that's related to anything here. – Barry Jun 28 '18 at 14:24
  • If you look it through, it makes the point that you the Standard does not quite give the implementation latitude nor mandate to unilaterally make the comparators argument a const&, though it may assume the comparator does not change ist arguments. Your implementations of the standard functions accepting a comparator does that though. It's a subtle point which should be emphasized if intended (unlikely) or fixed in the standard. – Deduplicator Jun 28 '18 at 15:35
4

They both use a binary search algorithm (for random access iterator).

  • std::lower_bound requires that the range to be sorted according to (binary) predicate partitioned with respect to the expression element < value or comp(element, value) (which is the case if range is sorted according to binary predicate).
  • std::partition_point requires that the range is partitioned according to the (unary) predicate.

You can indeed create a predicate to be able to use the other algorithm.

With:

const std::vector<int> v{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};

You can do with lower_bound:

assert(std::is_sorted(v.begin, v.end(), std::less<>));
auto it1 = std::lower_bound(v.begin, v.end(), 5, std::less<>);

or with partition_point:

auto pred = [](int e){ return e < 5; }
assert(std::is_partition(v.begin, v.end(), pred));
auto it2 = std::partition_point(v.begin, v.end(), pred);

assert(it1 == it2); // *it1 = 5

Or, with the other side

const std::vector<int> v{1, 3, 4, 2, 7, 5, 8, 6};

You can do with partition_point:

auto pred = [](int e){ return e < 5; }
assert(std::is_partition(v.begin, v.end(), pred));
auto it1 = std::partition_point(v.begin, v.end(), pred);

or with lower_bound:

auto pred2 = [](int lhs, int rhs){ return (lhs < 5) > (rhs < 5); }
assert(std::is_sorted(v.begin, v.end(), pred2));
auto it2 = std::lower_bound(v.begin, v.end(), 5, pred2);

assert(it1 == it2); // *it1 == 7
| improve this answer | |
  • i think this mostly covers it – Ankur S Jun 26 '18 at 20:18
  • 4
    lower_bound does not require sorted – Barry Jun 26 '18 at 20:23
  • 1
    @curiousguy That is not what people mean when they say sorted. [1, 6, 3, 5, 20, 24, 21, 75] is partitioned by the predicate x < 10. It is not sorted. Saying it is sorted by the value of x < 10 is needlessly confusing. – Barry Jun 29 '18 at 3:36
3

They are more or less equivalent except that lower_bound will use operator< to search the elements if a predicate is not provided.* partition_point is more generic in that it allows that the range was partitioned according to some generic predicate rather than some predicate against avalue.

Note that lower_bound greatly predates the existence of more generic partitioning concepts in C++.

*and it's heavily implied that the predicate used in lower_bound should satisfy a less-than relationship, though not required


From [alg.partitions]

template<class ForwardIterator, class Predicate> 
ForwardIterator partition_point(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last, Predicate pred);

Requires: ForwardIterator’s value type shall be convertible to Predicate’s argument type. [first, last) shall be partitioned by pred, i.e. all elements that satisfy pred shall appear before those that do not.

Returns: An iterator mid such that all_of(first, mid, pred) and none_of(mid, last, pred) are both true.

Complexity: O(log(last - first)) applications of pred.

And from [lower.bound]

template<class ForwardIterator, class T>
ForwardIterator
lower_bound(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last,
const T& value);

template<class ForwardIterator, class T, class Compare>
ForwardIterator
lower_bound(ForwardIterator first, ForwardIterator last,
const T& value, Compare comp);

Requires: The elements e of [first, last) shall be partitioned with respect to the expression e < value or comp(e, value).

Returns: The furthermost iterator i in the range [first, last] such that for every iterator j in the range [first, i) the following corresponding conditions hold: *j < value or comp(*j, value) != false.

Complexity: At most log2(last - first) + O(1) comparisons.

| improve this answer | |
  • does it ? can you link to such a requirement? – Ankur S Jun 26 '18 at 19:32
  • "it does not need to satisfy the requirements of Compare"en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/lower_bound – Ankur S Jun 26 '18 at 19:33
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    @Someprogrammerdude: Actually I revisted the standard and it says *j < value or comp(*j, value) != false. which allows for a generic predicate used for partitioning – AndyG Jun 26 '18 at 19:38
  • 1
    lower_bound doesn't use operator< to partition the range, the range must already be partitioned. Why do you say there's a heavy implication of less-than relationship for the predicate? It just needs to satisfy strict weak ordering. – Praetorian Jun 26 '18 at 19:51
  • 2
    @Praetorian: whoops on the misuse of 'partition' there. Also, see lwg 270 which states that the strict weak ordering was too strict a requirement and only a partitioning is necessary – AndyG Jun 26 '18 at 19:54

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