43

I'm learning Docker. For many times I've seen that Dockerfile has WORKDIR command:

FROM node:latest
RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/app
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY package.json /usr/src/app/
RUN npm install
COPY . /usr/src/app
EXPOSE 3000
CMD [ “npm”, “start” ] 

Can't I just omit WORKDIR and Copy and just have my Dockerfile at the root of my project? What are the downsides of using this approach?

  • At build time you change directory by WORKDIR – Ultraviolet Jun 27 '18 at 15:09
  • 1
    @Ultraviolet could you please explain this. I'm not quite getting the point – Le garcon Jun 27 '18 at 15:14
56

According to the documentation:

The WORKDIR instruction sets the working directory for any RUN, CMD, ENTRYPOINT, COPY and ADD instructions that follow it in the Dockerfile.

Also, in the Docker best practices it recommends you to use it:

... you should use WORKDIR instead of proliferating instructions like RUN cd … && do-something, which are hard to read, troubleshoot, and maintain.

I would suggest to keep it.

I think you can refactor your Dockerfile to something like:

FROM node:latest
RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/app
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY package.json .
RUN npm install
COPY . ./
EXPOSE 3000
CMD [ “npm”, “start” ] 
30

You dont have to

RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/app

This will be created automatically when you specifiy your WORKDIR

FROM node:latest
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY package.json .
RUN npm install
COPY . ./
EXPOSE 3000
CMD [ “npm”, “start” ] 
  • 1
    However, sometimes RUN mkdir is needed because WORKDIR doesn’t respect USER when creating directories - github.com/moby/moby/issues/20295 – Joe Bowbeer Nov 14 '18 at 8:19
  • 7
    I like the fact that you specified WORKDIR will create the folder automatically. – Bharat Raj Dec 13 '18 at 10:16
17

You can think of WORKDIR like a cd inside the container (it affects commands that come later in the Dockerfile, like the RUN command). If you removed WORKDIR in your example above, RUN npm install wouldn't work because you would not be in the /usr/src/app directory inside your container.

I don't see how this would be related to where you put your Dockerfile (since your Dockerfile location on the host machine has nothing to do with the pwd inside the container). You can put the Dockerfile wherever you'd like in your project. However, the first argument to COPY is a relative path, so if you move your Dockerfile you may need to update those COPY commands.

  • 2
    If WORKDIR adds like cd, won't the two COPY in the original example have the same source and destination? – Jonas Rosenqvist Oct 24 '18 at 13:57
  • 3
    No. WORKDIR affects the working directory inside the container. In the original example, the first COPY copies from package.json on the host (relative path to the Dockerfile) to /usr/src/app/package.json in the container. In fact, the WORKDIR has no impact on that particular command because the destination (inside the container) is not using a relative path (the path starts with /). – mkasberg Oct 25 '18 at 23:11
  • @mkasberg If WORKDIR acts like a cd. So does the 2 snippets below equivalent? WORKDIR /usr/src/app COPY package.json /usr/src/app/ and WORKDIR /usr/src/app COPY package.json . Thanks – kcatstack Nov 20 '18 at 15:12
  • 1
    Yes, those are equivalent. – mkasberg Nov 20 '18 at 15:32
0

Before applying WORKDIR. Here the WORKDIR is at the wrong place and is not used wisely.

FROM microsoft/aspnetcore:2
COPY --from=build-env /publish /publish
WORKDIR /publish
ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "/publish/api.dll"]

We corrected the above code to put WORKDIR at the right location and optimised the following statements by removing /Publish

FROM microsoft/aspnetcore:2
WORKDIR /publish
COPY --from=build-env /publish .
ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "/api.dll"]
  • You should not have the slash infront of api.dll as that would path it to the root of the container – Timothy c Jul 3 at 10:23
-2

You can, and that's fine. Sometimes you want to get a terminal on your container for debugging purposes.

docker exec -it [container-id] bash

Source

If you do, some people to find it pleasant to find their application in /usr/src/app. Or in /mkasberg/. Or any other dedicated working directory.

Another possibility is that your application relies on a certain absolute path.

Other than that, this is up to you.

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