320

I'm learning Docker. For many times I've seen that Dockerfile has WORKDIR command:

FROM node:latest
RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/app
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY package.json /usr/src/app/
RUN npm install
COPY . /usr/src/app
EXPOSE 3000
CMD [ “npm”, “start” ] 

Can't I just omit WORKDIR and Copy and just have my Dockerfile at the root of my project? What are the downsides of using this approach?

3
  • 3
    At build time you change directory by WORKDIR Jun 27, 2018 at 15:09
  • 7
    @Ultraviolet could you please explain this. I'm not quite getting the point
    – Le garcon
    Jun 27, 2018 at 15:14
  • would RUN mkdir -p ~/new_folder work? how do I use the working dir name to run docker commands in the docker file now? Jul 21, 2022 at 18:41

7 Answers 7

327

According to the documentation:

The WORKDIR instruction sets the working directory for any RUN, CMD, ENTRYPOINT, COPY and ADD instructions that follow it in the Dockerfile. If the WORKDIR doesn’t exist, it will be created even if it’s not used in any subsequent Dockerfile instruction.

Also, in the Docker best practices it recommends you to use it:

... you should use WORKDIR instead of proliferating instructions like RUN cd … && do-something, which are hard to read, troubleshoot, and maintain.

I would suggest to keep it.

I think you can refactor your Dockerfile to something like:

FROM node:latest
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY package.json .
RUN npm install
COPY . ./
EXPOSE 3000
CMD [ "npm", "start" ] 
6
  • 4
    @MarioGil Please take a look into the COPY documentation.
    – juanlumn
    May 16, 2019 at 7:42
  • 2
    When I use FROM ubuntu as builder and then the successive image use COPY, does it "know" I used WORKDIR in the "builder" image or I have to assume not (and use an absolute path) ?
    – Alex 75
    Jan 1, 2020 at 18:19
  • 1
    According to the docker documentation I would say that it keeps the WORKDIR value because is an instruction ran in the Dockerfile before you run the COPY one
    – juanlumn
    Jan 2, 2020 at 10:02
  • @Alex75 it does not. I have just tried it and it's not working. I'm still troubleshooting the issue. Also, the examples in the docs show code being copied from the root folder; I'll stick with absolute paths for now Feb 8, 2022 at 14:23
  • would RUN mkdir -p ~/new_folder work? how do I use the working dir name to run docker commands in the docker file now? Jul 21, 2022 at 18:41
122

You dont have to

RUN mkdir -p /usr/src/app

This will be created automatically when you specifiy your WORKDIR

FROM node:latest
WORKDIR /usr/src/app
COPY package.json .
RUN npm install
COPY . ./
EXPOSE 3000
CMD [ “npm”, “start” ] 
2
  • 8
    However, sometimes RUN mkdir is needed because WORKDIR doesn’t respect USER when creating directories - github.com/moby/moby/issues/20295 Nov 14, 2018 at 8:19
  • 61
    I like the fact that you specified WORKDIR will create the folder automatically.
    – GingerBeer
    Dec 13, 2018 at 10:16
87

You can think of WORKDIR like a cd inside the container (it affects commands that come later in the Dockerfile, like the RUN command). If you removed WORKDIR in your example above, RUN npm install wouldn't work because you would not be in the /usr/src/app directory inside your container.

I don't see how this would be related to where you put your Dockerfile (since your Dockerfile location on the host machine has nothing to do with the pwd inside the container). You can put the Dockerfile wherever you'd like in your project. However, the first argument to COPY is a relative path, so if you move your Dockerfile you may need to update those COPY commands.

10
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    If WORKDIR adds like cd, won't the two COPY in the original example have the same source and destination? Oct 24, 2018 at 13:57
  • 27
    No. WORKDIR affects the working directory inside the container. In the original example, the first COPY copies from package.json on the host (relative path to the Dockerfile) to /usr/src/app/package.json in the container. In fact, the WORKDIR has no impact on that particular command because the destination (inside the container) is not using a relative path (the path starts with /).
    – mkasberg
    Oct 25, 2018 at 23:11
  • 6
    @mkasberg If WORKDIR acts like a cd. So does the 2 snippets below equivalent? WORKDIR /usr/src/app COPY package.json /usr/src/app/ and WORKDIR /usr/src/app COPY package.json . Thanks
    – harry
    Nov 20, 2018 at 15:12
  • 5
    Yes, those are equivalent.
    – mkasberg
    Nov 20, 2018 at 15:32
  • 4
    I feel like Derek Zoolander saying, "IN the [Docker Container]!" O.o I get it now. Not relevant to the dev environment... only relevant to the runtime inside the Docker container. Got it. But... can it just be the root (i.e. "/")?
    – 4Z4T4R
    Feb 21, 2021 at 2:04
11

Before applying WORKDIR. Here the WORKDIR is at the wrong place and is not used wisely.

FROM microsoft/aspnetcore:2
COPY --from=build-env /publish /publish
WORKDIR /publish
ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "/publish/api.dll"]

We corrected the above code to put WORKDIR at the right location and optimised the following statements by removing /Publish

FROM microsoft/aspnetcore:2
WORKDIR /publish
COPY --from=build-env /publish .
ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "api.dll"]

So it acts like a cd and sets the tone for the upcoming statements.

1
  • 3
    You should not have the slash infront of api.dll as that would path it to the root of the container
    – Timothy c
    Jul 3, 2019 at 10:23
7

The answer by @juanlumn is great, but I wanted to add one more (important) thing.

In regular command line, if you cd somewhere, it stays there until you change it. However, in a Dockerfile, each RUN command starts back at the root directory! That's a gotcha for docker newbies, and something to be aware of.

So not only does WORKDIR make a more obvious visual cue to someone reading your code, but it also keeps the working directory for more than just the one RUN command.

1

Beware of using vars as the target directory name for WORKDIR - doing that appears to result in a "cannot normalize nothing" fatal error. IMO, it's also worth pointing out that WORKDIR behaves in the same way as mkdir -p <path> i.e. all elements of the path are created if they don't exist already.

UPDATE: I encountered the variable related problem (mentioned above) whilst running a multi-stage build - it now appears that using a variable is fine - if it (the variable) is "in scope" e.g. in the following, the 2nd WORKDIR reference fails ...

FROM <some image>
ENV varname varval
WORKDIR $varname

FROM <some other image>
WORKDIR $varname

whereas, it succeeds in this ...

FROM <some image>
ENV varname varval
WORKDIR $varname

FROM <some other image>
ENV varname varval
WORKDIR $varname

.oO(Maybe it's in the docs & I've missed it)

1
  • 1
    If you put your ENV values before the first FROM, I believe they are in scope for all FROM sections.
    – ErikE
    Sep 11, 2021 at 3:17
0

Be careful where you set WORKDIR because it can affect the continuous integration flow. For example, setting it to /home/circleci/project will cause error something like .ssh or whatever is the remote circleci is doing at setup time.

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