To start off with, I realize that I can write an if statement with this operator that compiles and runs. I'm wondering if there's a way it can be used to make an if/elsif/else block a little more elegant.

I currently have a block of code that looks like this

 if( $bill == $ted) {
        # Do some stuff
} elsif( $bill < $ted) {
        # Do different stuff
} else {
        # Do really weird stuff
}

So there are specific things I want the script to do based on whether the two values are equal, or if they aren't equal, whichever one is lower. It seems like the <=> operator would be well suited to this.

  • 2
    Personally, I'd be pretty happy with this code as written. I might reorder the conditions to reflect how likely they are to occur as a possible optimization. – tjd Jun 28 at 14:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, the operator returns 1, 0 or -1 depending on the test outcome, which is what sort uses.

So it's quite viable to do that. But I'm not sure if it's a particularly clear approach, compared to;

if ( $first < $second ) { do X ; next}
if ( $first > $second ) { do Y ; next}
do Z. #$first == $second

I'd strongly suggest avoiding single letter variable names, and most especially $a and $b. It's poor style, and $a and $b are used by sort which could lead to confusion.

  • Yeah, I caught the thing about variable names $a and $b a couple minutes after I (carelessly) wrote the question with them. I edited to correct that. FWIW, those aren't the variable names I'm really using. – Gern Blanston Jun 28 at 13:41

It's kind of obscure, but you can use the <=> operator to get an element of a dispatch table:

(   sub { say 'they are the same' },
    sub { say 'x is greater' },
    sub { say 'x is lesser' }
)[$x <=> $y]->();

It's based on the fact that the index -1 returns the last element of a list.

Using a hash might be more readable.

{    0 => sub { say 'they are the same' },
     1 => sub { say 'x is greater' },
    -1 => sub { say 'x is lesser' }
}->{ $x <=> $y }->();
  • 7
    Technically correct, but I think I'd be giving people who did that in production code a pretty hard time over it. – Sobrique Jun 28 at 13:39
  • 2
    Clever. Perhaps too clever? – tjd Jun 28 at 13:41
  • 2
    @GernBlanston This “optimization” is very likely not worth it even from a performance standpoint: subroutine calls tend to be measurably more expensive than simple operations like (non-overloaded) comparisons or if-statements. I'd bet the code in your question is already the fastest, followed by tjd's for-if pseudoswitch. – amon Jun 28 at 14:45
  • 1
    OTOH, if the initial expression is [complicated_function_x() <=> complicated_function_y()], then using <=> might save you a couple of function calls. – mob Jun 28 at 15:24
  • 1
    @mob my $temp_x = complicated_function_x(); my $temp_y = complicated_function_y(); would accomplish much the same goal. – tjd Jun 28 at 19:02

This uses the result of <=> as an array index like choroba's answer, but there is no need to store and call anonymous subroutines

I still wouldn't use it in live code

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

for my $x ( 1 .. 3 ) {
    say ['equal', 'greater than', 'less than']->[$x <=> 2];
}

output

less than
equal
greater than

I wouldn't call it elegant, but you could use a given/when to catch all the outcomes:

    use strict;
    use 5.10.0;
    use feature "switch";
    use experimental "smartmatch";

    my $x = 1;
    given( $x <=> 2 ){
        when(-1){
            say "stuff"
        }
        when(0){
            say "diff stuff"
        }
        when(1){
            say "other stuff"
        }
    }

Taking a cue from draxil w/o the experimental features:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $x = 1;
for ( $x <=> 2 ){
    if ($_ == -1){
        say "stuff"
    }
    if ($_ == 0){
        say "diff stuff"
    }
    if ($_ == 1){
        say "other stuff"
    }
}
  • 1
    This looks essentially equivalent to how it's already written, just with the additional evaluation in the for() statement. I'm not looking to use the <=> operator just for the sake of using it. Just wondering if there was some common function that already did what I'm doing with the if/elsif/else block. – Gern Blanston Jun 28 at 14:03
{
    goto (qw( EQ GT LS ))[$x <=> $y];
    LS:
        say('less');
        last;
    EQ:
        say('equal');
        last;
    GT:
        say('greater');
}

But:

This isn't necessarily recommended if you're optimizing for maintainability.

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