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CSS makes it super easy to have on hover effects for specific buttons/elements in yhour DOM. I'm trying to create a landing page of sorts for a desktop app, but I'm trying to get around having to copy paste specific states for each object I create in my main.qml.

Heres my main.qml

import QtQuick 2.9
import QtQuick.Window 2.2
import QtQuick.Controls 1.4

Window
{
    visible: true
    width: 640
    height: 480
    title: qsTr("Hello World")

    NavBar
    {
        id: mainNavigation

    }
}

NavButton.qml

Rectangle
{
    id: navButton
    height: parent.height
    width: parent.width / 3 - 10
    color: "orange"

    MouseArea
    {
        state: "unhovered"
        hoverEnabled: true
        height: parent.height
        width: parent.width
        onHoveredChanged:
        {
            console.log("hovered")
            if(this.state == "hovered")
            {
                parent.state = "unhovered"
            }
            else
            {
                parent.state = "hovered"
            }
        }
    } // end mouse area

    states:
    [
        State
        {
            name: "hovered"
            PropertyChanges
            {
                target: navButton
                width: parent.width
                color: "red"

            }
        },
        State
        {
            name: "unhovered"
            PropertyChanges
            {
                target: navButton
                width: parent.width
                color: "orange"
            }
        }
    ]
}

NavBar.qml

import QtQuick 2.0
import QtQuick.Controls 1.4

Row
{
    id: navigationBar
    height: parent.height / 3
    width: parent.width
    spacing: 15
    anchors.centerIn : parent


    NavButton
    {
        id: selectDevice
    }

    NavButton
    {
        id: deviceConfig
    }

    NavButton
    {
        id: deviceInfo
    }
}

right now when I hover over one of these navButtons all three of them expand in size, as apposed to having just the one I hovered over expand and change color. I'm hoping that like with CSS and Javascript, there's a way to target the element that is the subject of the hover event.

I've already tried used parent as the target of the states, but that doesn't seem to work. I've done a bit of hunting for a solution and I don't see anything obvious that allows me to accomplish this. the only alternative I see is to add states to each individual navButton inside my navBar file.

I really hope that isn't the case, as that would be a really verbose solution to a simple problem.

What I really need is a way to target just the element the event is occurring on.

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You can simply scrap all those states and whatnot, which are really not needed for such a trivial scenario:

Rectangle {
    id: navButton
    height: parent.height
    width: parent.width / 3 - 10
    color:  ma.containsMouse ? "red" : "orange"
    property alias hoverEnabled: ma.hoverEnabled

    MouseArea {
        id: ma
        anchors.fill: parent
    }
}

And you save yourself a bunch of code too. Then simply have hoverEnabled: true for all buttons you want to hover.

Or you can create an auxiliary type called HoverButton.qml which is just a NavButton { hoverEnabled: true } if you want to avoid setting it for each and every button.

I would also recommend to switch the nesting order of your button:

MouseArea {
    id: navButton
    height: parent.height
    width: parent.width / 3 - 10

    Rectangle {
        anchors.fill: parent
        color: navButton.containsMouse ? "red" : "orange"
    }
}

This avoids the need to use a property alias, saves you one id and allows you to bind to the mouse area handler hooks directly, something you cannot do in your original code without redirecting the signal with an additional handler and signal.

Finally, I don't think it will be productive to look at QML as if it is HTML, QML is not HTML, and it comes with its own usage paradigms.

  • Wow, that's awesome. I get what you mean about QML having it's own paradigms, and I wasn't so much comparing it to HTML and CSS as I was wondering what I must be missing for it to seem so much more difficult. It had never even occurred to me that you could do it in this way, since it deviates so much from standard thinking in Javascript. Generally I learned to think in terms of events and event handlers, so this is quite a departure! Thank you again for the solution- as I said this would've never occurred to me. – Carl Jun 29 '18 at 4:49
  • If I may, I'd like to ask further, how might one implement this with transition periods? I probably should've asked that to begin with since I have a feeling it changes the approach one might take, but maybe I'm wrong! My intention is to "animate" both color and size. I've seen this done with states and transitions but this leaves me with my original problem. – Carl Jun 29 '18 at 5:11
  • QML kinda looks like CSS, and it is a markup like HTML, but its overall design philosophy is different. IMO the management made a few bad decisions to model certain APIs after web APIs in order to appeal to web developers and increase QML adoption, which may further reinforce the idea the technologies are similar, but they are not. QML is very different from HTML, and expecting the same workflow is counterproductive. As for the animation - just look it up, there are several ways to do it. The simplest one is to install a Behavior on the property, and it automatically animates changes. – dtech Jun 29 '18 at 7:55

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