7

I have a n-by-3 array I wish to convert to a Dictionary<string,string[]> where the first column is the key and the rest of the column as an array for the value.

For example:

Key = arr[0,0], Value = new string[2] {arr[0,1], arr[0,2]}.

I'm aware of ToDictionary but I don't know how to set the value part.

arr.ToDictionary(x=>arr[x,0],x=>new string[2]{arr[x,1],arr[x,2]});
//This doesn't work!!!

How can I set it up correctly?

4
  • 1
    Is it a multi-dimensional array or a jagged array? Your example implies jagged.
    – MineR
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:00
  • It's multi-dimensional.
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:03
  • 1
    @Pikachu620 - If it is multidimensional then the key cannot be arr[0][0] - it must be arr[0, 0]. Which is it? Jun 29, 2018 at 3:09
  • My bad! I'll go edit it!!!
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:17

5 Answers 5

7

Multidimensional arrays are a continuous block of memory, so you kind of have to treat them like a single array. Try this:

var dict = arr.Cast<string>() 
  .Select((s, i) => new { s, i })
  .GroupBy(s => s.i / arr.GetLength(1))
  .ToDictionary(
    g => g.First().s,
    g => g.Skip(1).Select(i => i.s).ToArray()
  );

With explanations:

// First, cast it to an IEnumerable<string>
var dict = arr.Cast<string>() 

  // Use the Select overload that lets us get the index of the element,
  // And we capture the element's index (i), along with the element itself (s)
  // and put them together into an anonymous type [1]
  .Select((s, i) => new { s, i })

  // .GetLength(dimension) is a method on multidimensional arrays to 
  // get the length of a given dimension (pretty self-explanatory)
  // In this case, we want the second dimension, or how wide each 
  // row is: [x,y] <- we want y
  // Divide the element index (s.i) by that length to get the row index 
  // for that element
  .GroupBy(s => s.i / arr.GetLength(1))

  // Now we have an Grouping<int, IEnumerable<anonymous{string,int}>>
  .ToDictionary(

    // We don't care about the key, since it's the row index, what we want
    // is the string value (the `s` property) from first element in the row
    g => g.First().s,

    // For the value, we want to skip the first element, and extract
    // the string values (the `s` property), and then convert to an array
    g => g.Skip(1).Select(i => i.s).ToArray()
  );

[1]: See here for documentation on anonymous types.

9
  • Can you tell me what's m please!?
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 2:58
  • It was a typo. It's supposed to be arr. I've updated the answer and included explanations.
    – rossipedia
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:00
  • Can you be so kind and teach me what's s.i and i.s does please!? Thanks!
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:16
  • Added a bit more explanation, hopefully it makes things clearer.
    – rossipedia
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:42
  • Ehhh readability can be subjective, but I agree 100% on the performance part. LINQ can generally be pretty terrible when it comes to allocations and perf.
    – rossipedia
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:48
5

Sometimes not using linq is easier to read and faster:

 var dict = new Dictionary<string, string[]>();
 for (int i = 0; i < arr.GetLength(0); i++)
      dict[arr[i, 0]] = new string[] { arr[i, 1], arr[i, 2] };

But when you feel like you REALLY need to use linq:

 Enumerable.Range(0, arr.GetLength(0))
     .ToDictionary(i => arr[i, 0], i => new string[] {arr[i, 1], arr[i, 2]});
3
  • The Linq part is like mine and it doesn't work! Sorry!
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:28
  • @Pikachu620 No, it uses an Enumerable.Range, which is all you were missing from your original attempt, and then it does work. See a working example here: dotnetfiddle.net/Hig7rW
    – MineR
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:32
  • It did work! Thanks! I had change the accepted answer to yours!
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:51
2

This is the simplest approach I can come up with:

var arr = new int[4, 3]
{
    { 1, 2, 3 },
    { 3, 5, 7 },
    { 5, 8, 11 },
    { 7, 11, 15 },
};

var dict = arr.Cast<int>().Buffer(3).ToDictionary(x => x[0], x => x.Skip(1).ToArray());

That gives me:

dict

You just need to NuGet "System.Interactive" to get the Buffer operator.

Or use this implementation:

public static IEnumerable<T[]> Buffer<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
    =>
        source
            .Select((t, i) => new { t, i })
            .GroupBy(x => x.i / count)
            .Select(x => x.Select(y => y.t).ToArray());
1

I guess your approach was right ,my only doubt is that your array is static or not?

arr.Select((value, index) => new { value, index }) .ToDictionary(x => x.index, x => new string[2]{x.value[x.index][1],x.value[x.index][2]}));

Note: I couldn't execute and check the code ! Sorry.

1
  • I'm sorry to say that it doesn't!
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 3:26
1

I had done using Integer. Please Change for your requirements.

public static void Main()
{ 
    int row=0 , col=0;
    int[,] array = new int[,]
    {
     { 1, 2, 3 },
     { 4, 5, 6 }, 
     { 7, 8, 9 },
     { 10, 11, 12 } 
    };

    int flag=0;

    for (int i = 0; i < array.Rank; i++)
    {
                if(flag==0)
                {
        row= array.GetLength(i);
                    flag=1;
                }
                else
                {

         col= array.GetLength(i);       
                }

        }

    Dictionary<int,int[,]> dictionary = new Dictionary<int, int[,]>();

    for(int i=0;i<row;i++)
    {

        dictionary.Add(array[i,0],new int[, ]{{array[i,1]},{array[i,2]}});

    }

    Console.WriteLine(dictionary[4].GetValue(0,0));

}
1
  • Thanks for your answer. But I preferred Linq approach!
    – Pikachu620
    Jun 29, 2018 at 5:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.