3

This question might be simple but I never use raw pointers or arrays in C++ so...

I need to use a library function which looks like this:

void f(double a[3][3], double b[3], double c[3]);

a and b are used for input and the result is stored in c.

The computation of a is a bit complex but does never change so it makes sense to calculate it only once and save the result. In my program, I can link it to an object of type X.

class X{
public:
X(){ 
    a = {{1,2,3},
         {4,5,6},
         {7,8,9}}; 
    }

private:
    double a[3][3];
}

How can I write a getter for X::a which can be used in function f?

This is how I would like to call function f:

#include "X.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

    X o = X(); //create object
    double a[3][3] = o.getA(); // I want to get a somehow
    double b[3] =  {1,2,3}; // create dummy b
    double c[3] = {}; // create empty c
    f(a,b,c); // call funktion to populate c
    for(int i=0; i<3; ++i){
        std::cout << c[i] << endl;
    }
}
  • I might be missing some detail here, but in your snippet, you store X on the stack as well as a, and both are in the same scope. Why can't you just omit X and provide some function computeA(double a[3][3])? – lubgr Jun 29 '18 at 8:49
  • I changed the example a bit. Hope it is clearer now – user7431005 Jun 29 '18 at 8:55
  • You can't return raw pointer array from a function in C. You can return std::vector and get data(). In C int a[n] is equal int* a = malloc(sizeof(int) * n); free(a) – Andrew Romanov Jun 29 '18 at 9:07
  • @AndrewRomanov Of course you can, std::strdup does. And no, the two declarations you’ve shown are not equal. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:08
  • 1
    @Yksisarvinen Actually the parameter declaration double a[3][3] is equivalent to double (*)[3], which makes it compatible with A::a. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:13
3

You know std::vector is the way to go for 2D arrays in C++, but if you can't bypass the obstacle you are facing, then it would be possible to pass the matrix as a parameter to the getter function, like this:

#include <iostream>

class X {
 public:
    void getA(double (&array)[3][3]) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
            for (int j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
                array[i][j] = a[i][j];
    }
 private:
    double a[3][3] = {{1,2,3},
            {4,5,6},
            {7,8,9}};
};

int main(void) {
    X o = X();
    double a[3][3];
    o.getA(a);
    for(int i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
        for(int j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
            std::cout << a[i][j] << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
  • Rather than copying X::a, why not pass it directly? – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:26
  • Because X::a is allocated inside o and will die with o. It is not safe, because o will die then current scope will finish. – Andrew Romanov Jun 29 '18 at 9:29
  • @AndrewRomanov main::a has the same lifetime as main::o (and main::o.a), they will die together. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:44
  • 1
    @gsamaras Just make X::a public and pass o.a to f. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:55
  • 2
    @gsamaras Sure but in this case having a private data member makes no sense, and is actively detrimental. Real code should obviously do something completely different anyway. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:58
0

This snippet should serve your purpose.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class X {
public:
    X() {
    }

    typedef double (*ptr_matrix)[3];

    ptr_matrix getA(){
        return a;
    }

private:
    double a[3][3] = {{ 1,2,3},
        {4,5,6},
        {7,8,9}};
};

void f(double a[3][3], double b[3], double c[3])
{
    cout<<"Inside f function";
    for(auto i = 0; i < 3;i++) {
        cout<<endl;
        for(auto j = 0 ; j < 3;j++)
            cout<<a[i][j];
    }
}

int main()
{
    X o = X(); //create object
    double (*a)[3] = NULL;
    a = o.getA(); // I want to get a somehow

    double b[3] = {0};
    double c[3] = {0};

    f(a,b,c);

}
  • 1
    Same comment as on the other answer: why copy the array?! – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:44
  • removed copying – yadhu Jun 29 '18 at 9:55
  • 1
    I don’t think this code is much better: don’t pass results via arguments, use return values. I’m also not very happy by the aliasing of double[3][3] with double*, and you won’t be able to pass the result to OP’s f function without yet another cast. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 29 '18 at 9:58
  • 1
    And if I'm not mistaken, cout << a[i+j] is a bug: the i is missing a *3 to actually access a[i][j] – GeckoGeorge Jun 29 '18 at 10:11
  • This is cleanest way I could do. – yadhu Jun 29 '18 at 10:16

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