I'm starting with boost asio programming in C++ and when looking over the examples I just can't understand what does boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator do.

Code:

boost::asio::io_service io_service;

tcp::resolver resolver(io_service);
tcp::resolver::query query(argv[1]);
tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_iterator = resolver.resolve(query);
tcp::resolver::iterator end;

tcp::socket socket(io_service);
boost::system::error_code error = boost::asio::error::host_not_found;
while (error && endpoint_iterator != end)
{
  socket.close();
  socket.connect(*endpoint_iterator++, error);
}

Please help me and excuse me if my question doesn't provide enough information.

  • 2
    Gotta love the boost.asio namespaces. barf – Inverse Feb 25 '11 at 5:57
  • FYI: the query is for a service only. if you're looking for a specific host fpr a service, you need to add another parameter to the tcp::resolver::query ctor. – Donal Lafferty Oct 15 '14 at 21:43
up vote 20 down vote accepted

boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator iterates through the address list of the host that you specified (hosts can have multiple addresses).

Like an std::string::iterator iterates through its characters, boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator iterates through its address list.

The following code:

while (error && endpoint_iterator != end)
{
  socket.close();
  socket.connect(*endpoint_iterator++, error);
}

is attempting to establish a connection to each endpoint until it succeeds or runs out of endpoints (thank you for the correction Eugen Constantin Dinca).

  • 2
    Actually the while tries to connect to each endpoint until it succeeds or it runs out of endpoints. So at most 1 endpoint will be connected at the end of the loop. – Eugen Constantin Dinca Feb 24 '11 at 22:15
  • Why does it use *endpoint_iterator++ instead of endpoint_iterator++? Why would you need pointers? – Hami Feb 25 '11 at 22:18
  • 6
    @Hami ip::tcp::resolver::iterator is not a pointer, it just looks and behaves like one. The postfix increment operator (operator++(int)) gets the next iterator after the indirection operator (operator*()) obtains the underlying endpoint and returns it to socket::connect(). If the connection fails, error is set and the loop continues. These are the same concepts used by iterators in the Standard Template Library. – Sam Miller Feb 26 '11 at 17:22

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