5

Please, describe what these n| = n >>> x 5 lines do?

I am not interested in what | or >>> operators do. I am interested in what that complex logic do under cover in a math language.

/**
 * Returns a power of two size for the given target capacity.
 */
static final int tableSizeFor(int cap) {
    int n = cap - 1;
    n |= n >>> 1;
    n |= n >>> 2;
    n |= n >>> 4;
    n |= n >>> 8;
    n |= n >>> 16;
    return (n < 0) ? 1 : (n >= MAXIMUM_CAPACITY) ? MAXIMUM_CAPACITY : n + 1;
}
1
  • 2
    The middle 5 lines are a fast way of copying the highest bit set in value n = cap - 1 into all bits below it. So for example if n is initially 4, it will become 7. The total effect is just what is said in the comment: It returns the smallest power of 2 that's at least cap. For example, if cap is 11, then it copies the 8's bit (3) down to get 15 and adds one, returning 16. If you pass in 16, it returns 16. If you pass it 17, it returns 32. Etc. Of course it also checks that MAX_CAPACITY isn't exceeded. – Gene Jun 30 '18 at 20:54
11

All (positive) powers of two have exactly 1 bit set; and (power of 2 - 1) has all of the bits set less than the most significant bit. So, we can find the next largest power of two by

  • Subtracting 1
  • Setting all of the less significant bits
  • Adding 1 back

These bit shifting operations are implementing the second step of this process, by "smearing" the set bits.

So:

n |= n >>> 1;

Would do something like:

  01010000
| 00101000
= 01111000

If you do this again, you "smear" the number down again (still shifting by just 1):

  01111000
| 00111100
= 01111100

Keep on doing this, and you will end up with a number with all of the less significant bits set:

01111111

In the worst case, you'd have to do this 30 times (for a positive, signed 32 bit integer), when the most significant bit is the 31st bit:

   01xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
=> 011xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
=> 0111xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
=> 01111xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
=> 011111xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
...
=> 01111111111111111111111111111111

(x just means it could be a zero or a one)

But you might notice something interesting: after the first smear, when shifting by 1, we have the two most significant bits set. So, instead of shifting by 1, we can skip an operation by shifting by 2:

   01xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
=> 011xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
=> 01111xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Continuing with this pattern, shift by 4 next:

=> 011111111xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Shift by 8:

=> 01111111111111111xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Shift by 16:

=> 01111111111111111111111111111111

So, instead of taking 30 operations to set all the less significant bits, we have taken 5.

4
  • It seems that "Setting all of the less significant bits" has been implemented in a complicated way. – Grzegorz Górkiewicz Jul 1 '18 at 16:20
  • @GrzegorzGórkiewicz how would you do it? – Andy Turner Jul 1 '18 at 16:55
  • I would find the length of a binary String of the int argument. Say, for 101010 it is 6. I would return 1 + length of that String of zeros. 1000000. With Strings it may not be the best idea, but I think it can be done better. – Grzegorz Górkiewicz Jul 1 '18 at 17:08
  • @GrzegorzGórkiewicz I'd encourage you to try implementing it in the ways you suggest, and see if it really would be "better" (noting that your definition of better is not necessarily the same as anybody else's). – Andy Turner Jul 1 '18 at 18:28
0

To understand the process lets assume the value of cap passed is 10.

So n = capacity - 1 = 9; 0000 1001

n |= n >>> 1   = 0000 1101
n |= n >>> 2   = 0000 1111
n |= n >>> 4   = 0000 1111
n |= n >>> 8   = 0000 1111
n |= n >>> 16  = 0000 1111 = 15

Finally the method returns n + 1 = 16

For large numbers

cap           = 0000 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001
n = cap - 1   = 0000 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
n |= n >>> 1  = 0000 1100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
n |= n >>> 2  = 0000 1111 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
n |= n >>> 4  = 0000 1111 1111 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
n |= n >>> 8  = 0000 1111 1111 1111 1111 0000 0000 0000
n |= n >>> 16 = 0000 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111
return n + 1  = 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

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