26

Given the example code (Message is an Eloquent model.):

public function submit(Request $request){
    $this->validate($request, [
        'name' => "required",
        "email" => "required"
    ]);

    //database connection
    $message = new Message;
    $message->name = $request->input("name");
    $message->email = $request->input("email");

    $message->save();
}

Does Eloquent use parameterized queries (like PDO) or any other mechanisms to prevent SQL injection?

1
  • 6
    Yes it does. Read here, I will copy paste: The Laravel query builder uses PDO parameter binding to protect your application against SQL injection attacks. There is no need to clean strings being passed as bindings. Jul 1 '18 at 19:08
39

Yes, but...

Yes, it does SQL injection prevention when you rely on the built-in ORM functionality, like $someModelInstance->save(). From the docs:

Laravel's database query builder provides a convenient, fluent interface to creating and running database queries. It can be used to perform most database operations in your application and works on all supported database systems.

The Laravel query builder uses PDO parameter binding to protect your application against SQL injection attacks. There is no need to clean strings being passed as bindings.

Please note that you are not automatically protected if you build raw SQL statements and execute those or use raw expressions. More from the docs:

Raw statements will be injected into the query as strings, so you should be extremely careful to not create SQL injection vulnerabilities.

You should always use parameterized queries when building raw SQL statements or expressions. See the last link above (and other parts of the docs, as wel) for information on how to do that in Laravel/Eloquent.

2
  • So I read the documentation but I am still unsure. Would you still be protected against sql injection if you use ->whereRaw('query with binding ?', [$variableFromUser]) ?
    – Daniel
    Sep 7 '20 at 9:28
  • 2
    As long as you use the ? placeholder and don’t directly concatenate any values, yes. Protection from SQL injection is what the placeholder syntax is for.
    – elixenide
    Sep 7 '20 at 12:26

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