36

What is the difference between tensor.permute() and tensor.view()?

They seem to do the same thing.

5 Answers 5

20

Input

In [12]: aten = torch.tensor([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])

In [13]: aten
Out[13]: 
tensor([[ 1,  2,  3],
        [ 4,  5,  6]])

In [14]: aten.shape
Out[14]: torch.Size([2, 3])

torch.view() reshapes the tensor to a different but compatible shape. For example, our input tensor aten has the shape (2, 3). This can be viewed as tensors of shapes (6, 1), (1, 6) etc.,

# reshaping (or viewing) 2x3 matrix as a column vector of shape 6x1
In [15]: aten.view(6, -1)
Out[15]: 
tensor([[ 1],
        [ 2],
        [ 3],
        [ 4],
        [ 5],
        [ 6]])

In [16]: aten.view(6, -1).shape
Out[16]: torch.Size([6, 1])

Alternatively, it can also be reshaped or viewed as a row vector of shape (1, 6) as in:

In [19]: aten.view(-1, 6)
Out[19]: tensor([[ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6]])

In [20]: aten.view(-1, 6).shape
Out[20]: torch.Size([1, 6])

Whereas tensor.permute() is only used to swap the axes. The below example will make things clear:

In [39]: aten
Out[39]: 
tensor([[ 1,  2,  3],
        [ 4,  5,  6]])

In [40]: aten.shape
Out[40]: torch.Size([2, 3])

# swapping the axes/dimensions 0 and 1
In [41]: aten.permute(1, 0)
Out[41]: 
tensor([[ 1,  4],
        [ 2,  5],
        [ 3,  6]])

# since we permute the axes/dims, the shape changed from (2, 3) => (3, 2)
In [42]: aten.permute(1, 0).shape
Out[42]: torch.Size([3, 2])

You can also use negative indexing to do the same thing as in:

In [45]: aten.permute(-1, 0)
Out[45]: 
tensor([[ 1,  4],
        [ 2,  5],
        [ 3,  6]])

In [46]: aten.permute(-1, 0).shape
Out[46]: torch.Size([3, 2])
0
8

View changes how the tensor is represented. For ex: a tensor with 4 elements can be represented as 4X1 or 2X2 or 1X4 but permute changes the axes. While permuting the data is moved but with view data is not moved but just reinterpreted.

Below code examples may help you. a is 2x2 tensor/matrix. With the use of view you can read a as a column or row vector (tensor). But you can't transpose it. To transpose you need permute. Transpose is achieved by swapping/permuting axes.

In [7]: import torch

In [8]: a = torch.tensor([[1,2],[3,4]])

In [9]: a
Out[9]: 
tensor([[ 1,  2],
        [ 3,  4]])

In [11]: a.permute(1,0)
Out[11]: 
tensor([[ 1,  3],
        [ 2,  4]])

In [12]: a.view(4,1)
Out[12]: 
tensor([[ 1],
        [ 2],
        [ 3],
        [ 4]])

In [13]: 

Bonus: See https://twitter.com/karpathy/status/1013322763790999552

4

tensor.permute() permutes the order of the axes of a tensor.

tensor.view() reshapes the tensor (analogous to numpy.reshape) by reducing/expanding the size of each dimension (if one increases, the others must decrease).

0
0

The link gives a clear explanation about view, reshape, and permute:

  1. view works on contiguous tensors.
  2. reshape works on non-contigous tensors.
  3. permute returns a view of the original tensor input with its dimensions permuted. It is quite different to view and reshape.
0

Here is a comparison of the two methods in similar cases. Both examples give the same shape (3x2), which is modified from the original boo tensor (2x3). Please note that the order of the data differs.

tensor.view() reshapes original data to a compatible shape. It is possible to view a 2x3 tensor in shapes 6x1, 1x6, 3x2. This case preserves data contiguity (notice the order does not change).

    boo = torch.tensor([[1, 2, 3],
                        [4, 5, 6]])
    
    boo_viewed = boo.view(3, 2)
    # Original boo tensor (2x3)
    tensor([[1, 2, 3],
            [4, 5, 6]])
    
    # View of boo (3x2)
    tensor([[1, 2],
            [3, 4],
            [5, 6]])

tensor.permute() on the other hand, swaps given axes and data contiguity will not preserved. The order of the data has changed. Matrix transpose is an example of permute.

    boo = torch.tensor([[1, 2, 3],
                        [4, 5, 6]])
    
    boo_permuted = boo.permute(1, 0)
    # Original boo tensor (2x3)
    tensor([[1, 2, 3],
            [4, 5, 6]])
    
    # Permuted boo (3x2)
    tensor([[1, 4],
            [2, 5],
            [3, 6]])

An important concept here is about contiguous vs. non-contiguous data. It is a Torch memory format, regarding actual memory allocation and your tensor representation (see this answer).

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