1

I cannot figure out the regex to match the following:

#1234
#1234-1234
#1234-1234-1234
#123524-12123534-123354
#1234-1234-1234-1234-1234-1234-1234

This regex

/^#([0-9]+-[0-9+]+-[0-9+]+)|#(\d+)$/

matches

#1234
#1234-1234-1234
#123524-12123534-123354

but I want to do it for an unlimited number of -873459s as the user might enter. I've been looking at regex for phone numbers, but that doesn't seem to do it because they cap out at 3 hyphens.

Here is an example in action: https://regex101.com/r/yRSeI6/1

Ideally, whatever it found would be group 1, but that might be asking a lot.

4
  • Is this ok? ^#((?:\d+-?)+)$ If not, why? If it is ok, I can break it down in an answer. – zzxyz Jul 2 '18 at 23:04
  • Why do you require two dashes? – GalAbra Jul 2 '18 at 23:05
  • 1
    @zzxyz, it doesn’t look like #1234- is supposed to be valid input, so I think that wouldn’t work. – Aankhen Jul 2 '18 at 23:13
  • @Aankhen - ah yes – zzxyz Jul 2 '18 at 23:14
6

You can rephrase your regex as one or more digits followed by zero or more occurrences of a hyphen followed by digits:

^#(\d+(?:-\d+)*)$

Try it out.

2
  • 1
    That also matches #-------, though. – Aankhen Jul 2 '18 at 23:09
  • I didn't consider that. Good catch! – emsimpson92 Jul 2 '18 at 23:09

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