9

See this reproducible example :

---
title: "test"
output: html_document
---

## foo

```{r}
plot(1:3)
```

## bar

```{r}
plot(4:7)
```

## baz

```{r}
plot(8:12)
```

I want to be able to automate the creation of these sections as I can't know how many they will be before going further in my analysis.

My input to get this would be :

my_list   <- list(foo = 1:3, bar = 4:7, baz = 8:12)
my_fun    <- plot
my_depth  <- 2

And the ideal answer (though I'm welcoming any improvement) would help me build a mdapply function so that I could just run:

```{r}
mdapply(X = my_list, FUN = my_fun, title_depth = my_depth)
```

And get the same output.

3
10
+100

R package pander can generate Pandoc's markdown on the fly.

The key is to use the chunk option results='asis' to tell R Markdown to render pander's output as Markdown. You just need to be careful to generate valid Markdown!

Try this:

---
title: "Test sections"
output: html_document
---

## A function that generates sections

```{r}
library(pander)

create_section <- function() {

   # Inserts "## Title (auto)"
   pander::pandoc.header('Title (auto)', level = 2)

   # Section contents
   # e.g. a random plot
   plot(sample(1000, 10))

   # a list, formatted as Markdown
   # adding also empty lines, to be sure that this is valid Markdown
   pander::pandoc.p('')
   pander::pandoc.list(letters[1:3])
   pander::pandoc.p('')
}
```

## Generate sections

```{r, results='asis'}
n_sections <- 3

for (i in seq(n_sections)) {
   create_section()
}
```

It still looks hackish, but Markdown has its limits...

1
  • 1
    I don't think it's hacky, it looks quite idiomatic to me actually. Thanks a lot! I think I can tweak this into an apply function in fact. – Moody_Mudskipper Jan 15 '20 at 15:30
7

It seems like I found a way!

The whole idea is to pass what would be typed by hand as a string inside of knit(text=the_string) used in inline code.

So the function basically pastes a bunch of strings together, with a bit of substitute magic to have a function that feels like it's part of the apply family.

  • Parameter depth decides how many # you want.

  • Parameter options contains the chunk options, as a vector.

A vector shouldn't be able to contain logical and characters together but here it doesn't matter as it will all be coerced to character anyway, so c(echo= FALSE, results="hide") is fine.

I expect that it's easy to break but seems to work fine when treated gently.

---
title: "test"
output: html_document
---

```{r setup, include = FALSE}
library(knitr)    
mdapply <- function(X, FUN, depth, options=""){
  FUN       <- as.character(substitute(FUN))
  list_name <- as.character(substitute(X))
  if(options != "")
    options <- paste(",",names(options),"=",options,collapse="")
  build_chunk <- function(nm)
  {
    paste0(
      paste0(rep("#",depth), collapse=""),
      " ",
      nm,
      "\n\n```{r", options, "}\n",
      FUN,
      "(", list_name, "[['", nm, "']])\n```")
  }      
  parts <- sapply(names(X), build_chunk)
  whole <- paste(parts, collapse="\n\n")
  knit(text=whole)
  }
```

```{r code}
my_list   <- list(foo = 1:3, bar = 4:7, baz = 8:12)
```

`r mdapply(my_list, plot, 2, c(echo=FALSE))`
2

I would actually suggest a solution that works a little bit different, i.e. create the R-Markdown file from an R-script and then render it from the same R-script:

# function that creates the markdown header
rmd_header <- function(title){
paste0(
"---
title: \"", title, "\"
output: html_document
---
"
)
}

# function that creates the Rmd code for the plots
rmd_plot <- function(my_list, my_fun){
paste0(
"
## ", names(my_list), "

```{r}
", deparse(substitute(my_fun)), "(", deparse(substitute(my_list)), "[[", seq_along(my_list), "]])
```
"
)
}

# your objects
my_list   <- list(foo = 1:3, bar = 4:7, baz = 8:12)
my_fun    <- plot
my_depth  <- 2 # I actually don't get what this is for

# now write everything into an rmd file
cat(rmd_header("Your Title")
    , rmd_plot(my_list, plot)
    , file = "test.rmd")

# and then create the html from that
rmarkdown::render("test.rmd", output_file = "test.html")

One thing to mention here: the indentation in the Rmd file does matter and when you copy the code here, make sure that R-Studio inserts it in the R-script as intended (because often it doesn't).

1
  • This is really cool, I think Lorenzo provides the flexible solution that is probably the idiomatic way to do this sort of things, but I can definitely see value in this to spit quick reports during data exploration, great job, and thanks to meriops for extending the approach too. – Moody_Mudskipper Jan 15 '20 at 15:18
1

Taking a similar approach to @Georgery... but in a somewhat over-engineered fashion (also somewhat more general?). Anyway, here it goes.

make_template <- function(my_list, my_fun, my_depth, my_title, my_output_type, my_template_file){

  require(glue)

  n <- length(my_list)


  # --- Rmd header ---
  make_header <- function(my_title, my_output_type){
    #
    my_header <- glue(
                      "---", "\n",
                      "title: ", deparse({my_title}), "\n",
                      "output: ", deparse({my_output_type}), "\n",
                      "---", "\n",
                      "\n",
                      "\n"
    )
    return(my_header)
  }

  # --- one section only ---
  make_section <- function(i){
    one_section <- glue(
                        "\n",
                        "\n",
                        paste0(rep("#", times = {my_depth}), collapse = ""), " ", names({my_list})[[i]], "\n",
                        "\n",
                        "```{{r}}", "\n",
                        paste0({my_fun}, "(", deparse({my_list}[[i]]), ")"), "\n",
                        "```", "\n",
                        "\n",
                        "\n"
    )
    return(one_section)
  }


  # --- produce whole template ---

  my_header <- make_header(my_title, my_output_type)

  all_my_sections <- ""
  for (i in seq_along(my_list)) {
    all_my_sections <- paste0(all_my_sections, make_section(i))
  }

  my_template <- paste0(my_header, "\n", "\n", all_my_sections)

  # --- write out
  cat(my_template, file = my_template_file)
}




# --- try it

make_template(my_list = list(foo = 1:3, bar = 4:7, baz = 8:12, glop = 1:7),
              my_fun = "plot",
              my_depth = 4,
              my_title = "super cool title",
              my_output_type = "html_document",
              my_template_file = "my_template_file.Rmd"
)
1
  • Really nice thanks, I think it deserves better parameter names and defaults that'd be a great adhoc function to create multiplot reports. I'd also make myfun more flexible because your approach wouldn't be very convenient to create sophisticated ggplots without wapping them in a named function beforehand – Moody_Mudskipper Jan 15 '20 at 15:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.