38

I'm currently working on something where I fire out three promises in an array. At the moment it looks something like this

var a = await Promise.all([Promise1(), Promise2(), Promise3()]);

Now all of those promises will either return true or false. But at the moment I'm waiting for all of them to be finished and I could go on as soon as one of them returns true.

I thought of ways to accomplish that but all seem kind of ugly. How would you solve this task?

4
  • 3
    cant you simply use Promise.race?
    – grodzi
    Jul 3, 2018 at 17:47
  • 7
    @user753642 I don't think so. Race would mean, always stop after one of the Promises completes. The OP wants to stop only if any one of the Promises are true. At least, that's my understanding.
    – zero298
    Jul 3, 2018 at 17:52
  • correct. Thanks for the quick and many answers. Guess I'll have to work through that. Looks promising Jul 3, 2018 at 18:33
  • As an update to this, Promise.any() will likely be what you want once it reaches evergreen browsers.
    – zero298
    Jul 28, 2020 at 21:58

6 Answers 6

25

You can implement that combining Promise.race and Promise.all:

function firstTrue(promises) {
    const newPromises = promises.map(p => new Promise(
        (resolve, reject) => p.then(v => v && resolve(true), reject)
    ));
    newPromises.push(Promise.all(promises).then(() => false));
    return Promise.race(newPromises);
}

Test for above code:

function firstTrue(promises) {
  const newPromises = promises.map(p => new Promise(
    (resolve, reject) => p.then(v => v && resolve(true), reject)
  ));
  newPromises.push(Promise.all(promises).then(() => false));
  return Promise.race(newPromises);
}

var test = values => firstTrue(
  values.map((v) => new Promise((resolve) => {
    setTimeout(() => resolve(v), Math.round(Math.random() * 1000));
  }))
).then((ret) => console.log(values, ret));

test([true, true, true]);
test([false, false, false]);
test([true, false, false]);
test([false, true, false]);
test([false, false, true]);

4
  • This would actually solve the issue of what happens if all of them resolve to false. Jul 3, 2018 at 18:18
  • I think this is the slimmest way. Accepted answer? What do you think? Jul 4, 2018 at 6:32
  • Isn't there a race condition here? If all promises simultaneously resolve to true (or are already resolved to true before calling firstTrue()), then won't the individual transformed promises race with the .all() promise? I think replacing the .all() promise with this would fix it: Promise.all(promises).then(values => values.some(x => !!x)) Aug 28, 2020 at 20:11
  • 2
    @RichardHansen Resolution of Promise.then is enqueued internally (this behavior is required by EcmaScript standard). Promise.all calls internally Promise.then of the promises passed to it. Then one additional Promise.then needs to be called on the promise returned by Promise.all. As a result the resolution of Promise.all needs at least two enqueuing operations while the other promises in the array need only one (p.then). ES requires those enqueue operations to be called in the same order they were scheduled in. So the final resolution will always be scheduled before resolution of Promise.all.
    – jaboja
    Aug 31, 2020 at 0:29
14

If you want the cutting edge solution, it sounds like you want Promise.any() which:

Promise.any() takes an iterable of Promise objects and, as soon as one of the promises in the iterable fulfils, returns a single promise that resolves with the value from that promise. If no promises in the iterable fulfil (if all of the given promises are rejected), then the returned promise is rejected with an AggregateError, a new subclass of Error that groups together individual errors. Essentially, this method is the opposite of Promise.all().

However, that isn't due to be usable until

  • Chrome 85
  • Firefox 79
  • Safari 14
  • No IE, Edge, or Opera support

You basically want some().

  • Promise.all() won't work because it will make you wait for all the Promises to complete.
  • Promise.race() alone won't work because it only returns the resolution of 1 Promise.

Instead, we need to receive an Array of Promises and keep racing them until one of them returns true at which point, we should stop. If none of them are true, we still need to stop, but we need to note that none of them were true.

Consider the following example with test harness:

Code

/**
 * Promise aware setTimeout based on Angulars method
 * @param {Number} delay How long to wait before resolving
 * @returns {Promise} A resolved Promise to signal the timeout is complete
 */
function $timeout(delay) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        setTimeout(() => resolve(), delay);
    });
}

/**
 * Return true (early) if any of the provided Promises are true
 * @param {Function(arg: *): Boolean} predicate The test the resolved Promise value must pass to be considered true
 * @param {Promise[]} arr The Promises to wait on
 * @returns {Promise<Boolean>} Whether one of the the provided Promises passed the predicate
 */
async function some(predicate, arr) {
    // Don't mutate arguemnts
    const arrCopy = arr.slice(0);

    // Wait until we run out of Promises
    while(arrCopy.length){
        // Give all our promises IDs so that we can remove them when they are done
        const arrWithIDs = arrCopy.map((p, idx) => p.then(data => ({idx, data})).catch(_err => ({idx, data: false})));
        // Wait for one of the Promises to resolve
        const soon = await Promise.race(arrWithIDs);
        // If it passes the test, we're done
        if(predicate(soon.data))return true;
        // Otherwise, remove that Promise and race again
        arrCopy.splice(soon.idx, 1);
    }
    // No Promises passed the test
    return false;
}

// Test harness
const tests = [
    function allTrue(){
        console.log(new Date());
        return some((v)=>v, [
            $timeout(1000).then(() => true),
            $timeout(2000).then(() => true),
            $timeout(3000).then(() => true)
        ]).then(d => {
            console.log(d);
            console.log(new Date());
        });
    },
    function twoSecondsTrue(){
        console.log(new Date());
        return some((v)=>v, [
            $timeout(1000).then(() => false),
            $timeout(2000).then(() => true),
            $timeout(3000).then(() => true)
        ]).then(d => {
            console.log(d);
            console.log(new Date());
        });
    },
    function threeSecondsTrue(){
        console.log(new Date());
        return some((v)=>v, [
            $timeout(1000).then(() => false),
            $timeout(2000).then(() => false),
            $timeout(3000).then(() => true)
        ]).then(d => {
            console.log(d);
            console.log(new Date());
        });
    },
    function allFalse(){
        console.log(new Date());
        return some((v)=>v, [
            $timeout(1000).then(() => false),
            $timeout(2000).then(() => false),
            $timeout(3000).then(() => false)
        ]).then(d => {
            console.log(d);
            console.log(new Date());
        });
    },
    function threeSecondsTrueWithError(){
        console.log(new Date());
        return some((v)=>v, [
            $timeout(1000).then(() => { throw new Error() }),
            $timeout(2000).then(() => false),
            $timeout(3000).then(() => true)
        ]).then(d => {
            console.log(d);
            console.log(new Date());
        });
    }
]

tests.reduce((acc, curr) => acc.then(()=>curr()), Promise.resolve());

Output

// 1 Second true
2018-07-03T18:41:33.264Z
true
2018-07-03T18:41:34.272Z

// 2 Seconds true
2018-07-03T18:41:34.273Z
true
2018-07-03T18:41:36.274Z

// 3 Seconds true
2018-07-03T18:41:36.274Z
true
2018-07-03T18:41:39.277Z

// 3 Seconds false
2018-07-03T18:41:39.277Z
false
2018-07-03T18:41:42.282Z

// 3 Seconds true with error throwing
2018-07-03T18:41:42.282Z
true
2018-07-03T18:41:45.285Z
1
  • you are ninja of promises
    – Yegor
    Jul 28, 2020 at 18:19
13

You can create a new promise that resolves as soon as any given promise resolves to true like this:

function promiseRaceTrue(promises) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        promises.forEach(promise =>
            promise.then(val => val === true && resolve())
            // TODO handle resolve with value of "false"?
            // TODO handle rejection?
        );
        // TODO handle all resolved as "false"?
    });
}

var a = await promiseRaceTrue([Promise1(), Promise2(), Promise3()]);

It behaves similar to Promise.race but only resolves if one of the given promises resolves with the value true instead of resolving as soon as any of the given promises either resolves or rejects.

4
  • What were to happen if they all return false? Would the promise never resolve? Jul 3, 2018 at 17:58
  • 1
    With the current code, no it would not resolve. But you could easily fix that by adding Promise.all and either resolve or reject if all given promises resolved to false. Also you would probably need to handle rejection, but that is not specified in the question.
    – str
    Jul 3, 2018 at 18:02
  • 1
    I believe the only other "clean" way might be to add this function to Promise.prototype; however, that can be arguably unclean since it would be editing the prototype.
    – Tyler
    Jul 3, 2018 at 18:11
  • 3
    @Tyler Yeah, "clean way" and "add this function to Promise.prototype" is contradictory in my opinion ;)
    – str
    Jul 3, 2018 at 18:14
7

Can use Promise.race() and only resolve initial promises when value is true

const doSomething = (bool, val)=>{
  return new Promise((resolve, reject)=>{
     if (bool){
        resolve(val)
     }
  })
}

const promise1 = doSomething(false,'one')
const promise2 = doSomething(false,'two')
const promise3 = doSomething(true,'three')
const promise4 = doSomething(true,'four')
const promise5 = doSomething(true,'five')

Promise.race([promise1, promise2, promise3, promise4, promise5]).then(value => {
  console.log('First true one to resolve is: ', value);
  
});

0
5

Advancing off of str's answer I would like to add the ability to provide a callback so this works on more than true/false Promises.

Adding a callback will allow to test the result of any Promise, and return the promise that successfully matches the callback filter (which should return a true/false value).

Promise.until = function(callback, ...promises) {
  return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    promises.forEach(promise =>
      promise.then(val => callback(val) === true && resolve(val))
    )
  })
}

// Create some functions that resolve true/false
function Promise1() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve(false), 1000))}
function Promise2() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve(true), 3000))}
function Promise3() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve(false), 1000))}

// Create som functions that resolve objects
function Promise4() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve({a:1}), 1000))}
function Promise5() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve({a:2}), 3000))}
function Promise6() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve({a:123}), 1000))}

// Create some functions that resolve strings
function Promise7() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve('Brass'), 1000))}
function Promise8() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve('Monkey'), 500))}
function Promise9() {return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(()=> resolve(['Brass', 'Monkey']), 100))}

// Once one resolves `true` we will catch it
Promise.until(result => result === true, Promise1(), Promise2(), Promise3())
  .then(result => console.log(result));

// Once one resolves where `a` equals 123, we will catch it
Promise.until(result => result.a === 123, Promise4(), Promise5(), Promise6())
  .then(result => console.log(result));
  
// Once one resolves where `a` equals 123, we will catch it
Promise.until(result => result === 'Monkey', Promise7(), Promise8(), Promise9())
  .then(result => console.log(result));

1

OK, I will leave the accepted answer as is. But I altered it a little bit for my needs as I thought this one is a little easier to read and understand

const firstTrue = Promises => {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        // map each promise. if one resolves to true resolve the returned promise immidately with true
        Promises.map(p => {
            p.then(result => {
                if(result === true){
                    resolve(true);
                    return;
                } 
            });
        });
        // If all promises are resolved and none of it resolved as true, resolve the returned promise with false
        Promise.all(Promises).then(() => {
            resolve(Promises.indexOf(true) !== -1);
        });   
    });    
} 

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