4

What are the (dis)advantages of using the following (A):

// .h
class SomeClass
{
    static const struct ConstantGroup
    {
        int a = 1;
        string b = "b";
        // ... etc.
    } CONSTANT;
};
// .cpp
const SomeClass::ConstantGroup SomeClass::CONSTANT;

Versus (B):

// .h
class SomeClass
{
    static const int A;
    static const string B;
    // .. etc.
};
// .cpp
const int SomeClass::A = 1;
const string SomeClass::B = "b";

...for some group(s) of related static class constants? Assume no templates are involved and that the constants contain simple types (POD or strings).

So far I see the following advantages in favor of (A):

  • Related constants can be passed around as a group EDIT: As was pointed out in the comments, this is not generally desired.
  • Given that the constants are often accessed together, we can create shorthands for the structure to improve readability when needed, i.e.: static const auto & SHORTHAND = SomeClass::LONG_NAME_FOR_CONSTANTS;

What are the disadvantages, gotcha's, or other things to keep in mind when using this pattern?

14
  • 1
    For the first example ("A") you introduce a new scope for the constants (which aren't really constant themselves, and the structure is instantiable). And realistically, with a good optimizing compilers, both would probably be just about the same, you have to compare the assembly output from both to be sure. Jul 3, 2018 at 21:08
  • 3
    Note that constexpr should be use in modern c++ to declare constants : static constexpr int a = 1; Jul 3, 2018 at 21:34
  • 1
    std::string is not a simple type and defining one will involve a runtime initialiser so you might prefer to use constexpr char * instead.
    – catnip
    Jul 3, 2018 at 21:52
  • 2
    @PaulSanders ... or constexpr std::string_view. Jul 3, 2018 at 23:04
  • 1
    Why would you "pass around" global constants?
    – M.M
    Jul 4, 2018 at 2:05

2 Answers 2

6

(A) might be harder to optimize by removing unnecessary variables from the final executable.

If you want to group constants, then consider using a namespace for that purpose.

namespace ConstantGroup
{
    constexpr int a = 1;

    // Here best solution might depend on usage and c++ version
    const std::string b;    
}

Passing constants as a group really does not make much sense. If something is really constant, then you need a single definition and always use it.

Also if the constant is very specific to one class, then make it a (static) member of that class.

4
  • Is there an equivalent for this when we're talking about static class constants that are applicable only to the context of a class and others derived from it?
    – Stargazer
    Jul 4, 2018 at 7:07
  • Since a constant is constant, usually you don’t really need to hide or restrict its access. If you want it to be available to derived classes, then make it protected in a base class. Needing both protection and grouping should rarely be an issue.
    – Phil1970
    Jul 4, 2018 at 16:11
  • It is not an issue at all. It is merely a question of semantics, readability, and C++'s expressiveness. Basically what I'm curious about is a hypothetical "namespaces in class scope" feature. Leave aside for a moment whether it is generally useful, my question is whether its emulation in the way I proposed has some hidden strong/weakpoints that I'm unaware of.
    – Stargazer
    Jul 4, 2018 at 16:27
  • A language like C++ is intended for real-world development… so for a feature to be added to the language, it have to be useful (and passing a group of global constants around is not one of them). I would either us (B) or a namespace as suggested in my answer if I want to define many related constants (like seconds per minute, seconds per days, minutes per hour…) if in my application I often need that kind of constants. Otherwise, I would use constants appropriately scoped (class or function level). I don't think that (A) could ever be useful.
    – Phil1970
    Jul 7, 2018 at 13:17
2

Interesting (following on from a conversation in the comments above with @Henri Menke about strings and string_views).

Given this:

#include <string>
#include <string_view>
#include <iostream>

static const std::string a = "a";
static const std::string_view b = "b";

int main ()
{
    std::cout << a << "\n";
    std::cout << b << "\n";
}

You can clearly see at Godbolt that constructing a requires a runtime initialiser whereas b is a compile-time constant.

If you don't [like] read[ing] the code generated by the compiler, then try changing both consts to constexprs. Then, std::string_view still compiles but std::string does not.

So, for static and / or global constant strings, constexpr std::string_view = "blah blah blah"; looks to be a good solution here as Henri says because it offers quite a bit of extra functionality over a good old-fashioned C-string, IF you can use C++17 AND you don't mind the cost of converting these to std::strings (which will involve constructing one) in contexts where that is what is needed at that point in the code.

If not, you are forced back to std::string or perhaps plain old C-strings.


Edit:

I noticed a strange shortcoming in std::stringview while looking into this: it offers no operator std::string () method. I've no idea why not but it means, for example, that the following won't compile:

void foo (std::string s)
{
    ...
}

std::string_view sv = ...;
foo (sv);

This is not good enough say I, so in a spirit of sharing (if anyone's still reading at this point), I humbly offer you this:

#include <string>
#include <string_view>

template <class T> struct MyBasicStringView : public std::basic_string_view <T>
{
    constexpr MyBasicStringView (const T *s) : std::basic_string_view <T> (s) { }
    operator std::basic_string <T> () const { return std::basic_string <T> (this->data ()); }
};

using MyStringView = MyBasicStringView <char>;

Test program:

static constexpr MyStringView a_static_string_view = "static_string";

std::string foo (std::string s)
{
    return s + " x";
}

#include <iostream>

int main ()
{
    std::cout << a_static_string_view << "\n";
    MyStringView sv = "abcde";
    std::cout << sv << "\n";
    std::cout << foo (sv) << "\n";
}

Output:

static_string
abcde
abcde x

Live demo.

2
  • Unfortunately I'm bound to C++11. As for string vs constexpr char *. I think the construction cost is negligible. Since these constants are very likely to be passed through methods and operators acting on string I rather construct them just once. Also, I would prefer to have the full utility of string at my disposal, so that I may for example compare (==) values straightaway and not addresses.
    – Stargazer
    Jul 4, 2018 at 7:13
  • OK, makes sense. I have amended my answer slightly.
    – catnip
    Jul 4, 2018 at 7:56

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