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Why isn't the time complexity here O(n^2) and instead it is O(n)? Isn't the first loop is n times, & the same is the second one, so it becomes O(n*n), what is wrong here?

void f(int n){

     for( ; n>0; n/=2){
         int i;
         for(i=0; i<n; i++){
             printf("hey");
         }
     }
}
3
5

Isn't the first loop is n times, & the same is the second one, so it becomes O(n*n).

Above statement is false, since:

  1. The outer loop does not run n times. (The outer loop runs O(log n) times, but it does not matter in this case.)
  2. For the inner loop, the number of loops differs as the value of n changes.

To get the time complexity of this code, we should count the total number of times the body of the inner loop is executed.

  1. Clearly, the body of the inner loop is executed n times, for each value of n.
  2. The value of n is determined by the for statement of the outer loop. It starts from the value given as the argument to the function, and is halved each time the body of outer loop is executed.

So as already stated by the comments, since n + n/2 + n/4 + n/8 + ... = 2n, the time complexity for this algorithm is O(n).


For some more concrete mathematical proof on this:

Find an integer k such that 2^(k-1) < n <= 2^k. For this k:

  1. A lower bound for the total number of inner loops is 1 + 2 + 4 + ... + 2^(k-1) = 2^k - 1 >= n - 1 ∈ Ω(n).
  2. An upper bound for the total number of inner loops is 1 + 2 + 4 + ... + 2^k = 2^(k+1) - 1 < 4n - 1 ∈ O(n).

Therefore the total number of inner loops is Θ(n), as well as O(n).

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