15

I want to check if a string contains a numeric value. I have this code :

$string = "some string that contains 123456     in the middle"
$substring = $string.substring(27,9).Trim()

I have $substring which will be containing "123456" and I found this IsNumeric function here : In PowerShell, how can I test if a variable holds a numeric value?

The thing is that this when I'm extracting it from $string it acts like string type and IsNumeric returns false since it's comparing it to the all numeric types. and even tough it will contain a number the output of IsNumeric will be false.

Is there a better way to check if string contains numeric values?

7 Answers 7

28

You can use a regular expression match to test it:

if($substring -match "^\d+$")
{
   # Do something
}

This should work for any string which contains only digits (i.e. is a positive integer). Change the pattern to ^-?\d+$ if you want to include negative integers.

18

The correct way to check if a given string can be turned into a number:

[string]$InString = "123456"
[Int32]$OutNumber = $null

if ([Int32]::TryParse($InString,[ref]$OutNumber)){
    Write-Host "Valid Number"
    $OutNumber
} else {
    Write-Host "Invalid Number"
    #error code here
}

then $OutNumber will contain the number as a numeric type.

0
10

In regex \d is the check for digits

\d* checks for 0 to infinite digits

\d? Checks for 0 to 1 digit

\d{0,5} checks for 0 to 5 digits

\d+ checks for 1 to infinite digits

^ is the beggining of a line

$ is the end of a line

So

^\d+$ will check for 1 or more digits from the beginning to the end of the line and only digits. Any other symbol will break the connection from beginning to end and not be found.

0
6

Using the -as type_operator is probably the most powershell way. It will return the number, or $null if it was not possible to convert. To keep the examples as short as possible I am using int but this will work for float and double as well. For example:

"0" -as [int]

If for some reason you only wanted to check if the string contains numeric data then you could simply test this against $null via ($null -ne ("0" -as [int]))

But it's probably far more likely that you will want to use the value once converted, if possible, which is easily done by just assigning the result to a variable then checking against $null:

$myNum = "0" -as [int]
if ($myNum -eq $null) {
    #is not numeric
} else {
    #is numeric
}

Using exceptions as program control is a very bad practice, and likely a guarantee that you will see a performance increase with this over that.

I haven't tested this assertion, but I think it is very likely you will also see a performance increase over the regex method posted as well, with the bonus of also having the number handy. You could use a regex with grouping to achieve the same thing, but nobody has posted that yet:

"0" -match "(?<num>\d*)"
$Matches.num

Plus you still have actually do the conversion:

$Matches.num.GetType()
([Int32]$Matches.num).GetType()
1
  • To avoid temporary variable if (("24" -as [int]) -is [int]) Apr 1 at 11:22
4

The traditional way using the .NET framework:

if( [Microsoft.VisualBasic.Information]::IsNumeric($myString) ) {
  # do something
}
2
  • Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic; Add-Type -AssemblyName 'Microsoft.VisualBasic, Version=10.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a';
    – Garric
    Nov 14, 2021 at 18:14
  • This has a small issue with dollar amounts. If I used this it passes for '$42', but later when I attempt to cast to [int] PowerShell throws an error.
    – Tolga
    Jan 19 at 2:34
0

using error

It's accepts decimal numbers too.

[string]$myString = "12.3456"
try{
    [int]$res=[int]1*$myString
    Write-Host "Valid Number"
}catch{
    Write-Host "Invalid Number"
}
-1

use -match '\d'

string = "some string that contains 123456     in the middle"
$substring = $string.substring(27,9).Trim()
$substring -match '\d'
3
  • It actually returns true for every type of substring that I've tried. Even with letters and numbers mixed together
    – Marked One
    Jul 4, 2018 at 10:49
  • 2
    @MarkedOne the regex here should have been ^\d+$ to say 'only numbers' rather than just 'contains at least one number'.
    – colsw
    Jul 4, 2018 at 11:08
  • "Is there a better way to check if string contains numeric value?" I read this as a string may contain a numeric value not only numeric values :)
    – Simon B
    Jul 4, 2018 at 11:26

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