25

I have a program that outputs a textual table using UTF-8 strings, and I need to measure the number of monospaced character cells used by a string so I can align it properly. If possible, I'd like to do this with standard functions.

  • > UTF-8 string is a null-terminated string It depends whether you allow or expect U+0000 code point inside. – adobriyan Feb 25 '11 at 13:05
  • @adobriyan – U+0000 is the null character, so it terminates a null-terminated Unicode string, which in UTF-8 happens to also be a null-terminated char string – right? :) – aaz Feb 25 '11 at 13:15
  • U+0000 by definition terminates "null-terminated Unicode string". :-) But, but. If you look at strings C way, U+0000 can never appear in it. If you look at strings as one-dimensional array with element type being character (Unicode), U+0000 doesn't terminate such string. – adobriyan Feb 25 '11 at 13:22
  • 2
    @aaz: a unicode string should be able to represent all valid unicode character sequences, ie you can't use U+0000 as sentinel value; that's where 'modified UTF8' comes in: it encodes U+0000 as the two-byte sequence 0xC0,0x80, thus freeing the single byte 0x00 for use as string terminator... – Christoph Feb 25 '11 at 13:22
  • @adobriyan that in no way makes it different from an ASCII string. By convention C strings are terminated with a 0x00 byte, UTF8 strings are the same. here 0x00 represents U+0000 because ASCII and unicode share the same first 0x80 code points. – Jasen Oct 18 '13 at 21:14
33

From UTF-8 and Unicode FAQ for Unix/Linux:

The number of characters can be counted in C in a portable way using mbstowcs(NULL,s,0). This works for UTF-8 like for any other supported encoding, as long as the appropriate locale has been selected. A hard-wired technique to count the number of characters in a UTF-8 string is to count all bytes except those in the range 0x80 – 0xBF, because these are just continuation bytes and not characters of their own. However, the need to count characters arises surprisingly rarely in applications.

  • 1
    Ah, that's a bit more lightweight than the ICU libraries! +1 – Nick Feb 25 '11 at 12:58
  • 27
    keep in mind that counting codepoints will give the wrong answer if combining characters are involved; even normalizint the input won't help as there are graphemes which do not map to single codepoints... – Christoph Feb 25 '11 at 13:16
  • 2
    In the context of alignment (as per the question), the same document says that character counts are not sufficient: "neither a byte nor a character count will predict the display width, because ideographic characters (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) will occupy two column positions, whereas control and combining characters occupy none. To determine the width of a string on the terminal screen, it is necessary to decode the UTF-8 sequence and then use the wcwidth function to test the display width of each character, or wcswidth to measure the entire string." – Chris Leishman Aug 21 '16 at 4:36
21

You may or may not have a UTF-8 compatible strlen(3) function available. However, there are some simple C functions readily available that do the job quickly.

The efficient C solutions examine the start of the character to skip continuation bytes. The simple code (referenced from the link above) is

int my_strlen_utf8_c(char *s) {
   int i = 0, j = 0;
   while (s[i]) {
     if ((s[i] & 0xc0) != 0x80) j++;
     i++;
   }
   return j;
}

The faster version uses the same technique, but prefetches data and does multi-byte compares, resulting is a substantial speedup. The code is longer and more complex, however.

  • 10
    strlen(3) counts bytes. – ninjalj Mar 5 '11 at 14:53
  • I think works better like this size_t my_strlen_utf8_c(const char *s) – the kamilz Jul 2 '18 at 11:48
6

I'm shocked that no one mentioned this, so here it goes for the record:

If you want to align text in a terminal, you need to use the POSIX functions wcwidth and wcswidth. Here's correct program to find the on-screen length of a string.

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE
#include <wchar.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int measure(char *string) {
    // allocate enough memory to hold the wide string
    size_t needed = mbstowcs(NULL, string, 0) + 1;
    wchar_t *wcstring = malloc(needed * sizeof *wcstring);
    if (!wcstring) return -1;

    // change encodings
    if (mbstowcs(wcstring, string, needed) == (size_t)-1) return -2;

    // measure width
    int width = wcswidth(wcstring, needed);

    free(wcstring);
    return width;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    setlocale(LC_ALL, "");

    for (int i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
        printf("%s: %d\n", argv[i], measure(argv[i]));
    }
}

Here's an example of it running:

$ ./measure hello 莊子 cAb
hello: 5
莊子: 4
cAb: 4

Note how the two characters "莊子" and the three characters "cAb" (note the double-width A) are both 4 columns wide.

As utf8everywhere.org puts it,

The size of the string as it appears on the screen is unrelated to the number of code points in the string. One has to communicate with the rendering engine for this. Code points do not occupy one column even in monospace fonts and terminals. POSIX takes this into account.

Windows does not have any built-in wcwidth function for console output; if you want to support multi-column characters in the Windows console you need to find a portable implementation of wcwidth give up because the Windows console doesn’t support Unicode without crazy hacks.

  • 1
    +1 for the only correct answer in here... Did you know about wcwidth beforehand or you looked at the hidden comment in the manifesto? hehe :D Btw, Windows console still works in UCS-2 and I guess does not even support double-width characters. – ybungalobill Jul 10 '16 at 16:41
  • @ybungalobill: Glad to see someone saw this! – Functino Jul 12 '16 at 18:32
4

If you are able to use 3rd party libraries, have a look at the ICU library from IBM:

http://site.icu-project.org/

  • 1
    It's very heavy. – PersianGulf Mar 2 '14 at 13:59
  • 1
    @MohsenPahlevanzadeh The Unicode standard is also heavy, and counting characters is one of the trickier parts. – Textmode Jan 3 '15 at 21:31
3

The following code takes ill-formed byte sequences into consideration. the example of string data comes from ""Table 3-8. Use of U+FFFD in UTF-8 Conversion"" in the Unicode Standard 6.3.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

#define is_trail(c) (c > 0x7F && c < 0xC0)
#define SUCCESS 1
#define FAILURE -1

int utf8_get_next_char(const unsigned char*, size_t, size_t*, int*, unsigned int*);
int utf8_length(unsigned char*, size_t);
void utf8_print_each_char(unsigned char*, size_t);

int main(void)
{
    unsigned char *str;
    str = (unsigned char *) "\x61\xF1\x80\x80\xE1\x80\xC2\x62\x80\x63\x80\xBF\x64";
    size_t str_size = strlen((const char*) str);

    puts(10 == utf8_length(str, str_size) ? "true" : "false");
    utf8_print_each_char(str, str_size);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

int utf8_length(unsigned char *str, size_t str_size)
{
    int length = 0;
    size_t pos = 0;
    size_t next_pos = 0;
    int is_valid = 0;
    unsigned int code_point = 0;

    while (
        utf8_get_next_char(str, str_size, &next_pos, &is_valid, &code_point) == SUCCESS
    ) {
        ++length;
    }

    return length;
}

void utf8_print_each_char(unsigned char *str, size_t str_size)
{
    int length = 0;
    size_t pos = 0;
    size_t next_pos = 0;
    int is_valid = 0;
    unsigned int code_point = 0;

    while (
        utf8_get_next_char(str, str_size, &next_pos, &is_valid, &code_point) == SUCCESS
    ) {
        if (is_valid == true) {
            printf("%.*s\n", (int) next_pos - (int) pos, str + pos);
        } else {
            puts("\xEF\xBF\xBD");
        }

        pos = next_pos;
    }
}

int utf8_get_next_char(const unsigned char *str, size_t str_size, size_t *cursor, int *is_valid, unsigned int *code_point)
{
    size_t pos = *cursor;
    size_t rest_size = str_size - pos;
    unsigned char c;
    unsigned char min;
    unsigned char max;

    *code_point = 0;
    *is_valid = SUCCESS;

    if (*cursor >= str_size) {
        return FAILURE;
    }

    c = str[pos];

    if (rest_size < 1) {
        *is_valid = false;
        pos += 1;
    } else if (c < 0x80) {
        *code_point = str[pos];
        *is_valid = true;
        pos += 1;
    } else if (c < 0xC2) {
        *is_valid = false;
        pos += 1;
    } else if (c < 0xE0) {

        if (rest_size < 2 || !is_trail(str[pos + 1])) {
            *is_valid = false;
            pos += 1;
        } else {
            *code_point = ((str[pos] & 0x1F) << 6) | (str[pos + 1] & 0x3F);
            *is_valid = true;
            pos += 2;
        }

    } else if (c < 0xF0) {

        min = (c == 0xE0) ? 0xA0 : 0x80;
        max = (c == 0xED) ? 0x9F : 0xBF;

        if (rest_size < 2 || str[pos + 1] < min || max < str[pos + 1]) {
            *is_valid = false;
            pos += 1;         
        } else if (rest_size < 3 || !is_trail(str[pos + 2])) {
            *is_valid = false;
            pos += 2;
        } else {
            *code_point = ((str[pos]     & 0x1F) << 12) 
                       | ((str[pos + 1] & 0x3F) <<  6) 
                       |  (str[pos + 2] & 0x3F);
            *is_valid = true;
            pos += 3;
        }

    } else if (c < 0xF5) {

        min = (c == 0xF0) ? 0x90 : 0x80;
        max = (c == 0xF4) ? 0x8F : 0xBF;

        if (rest_size < 2 || str[pos + 1] < min || max < str[pos + 1]) {
            *is_valid = false;
            pos += 1;
        } else if (rest_size < 3 || !is_trail(str[pos + 2])) {
            *is_valid = false;
            pos += 2;
        } else if (rest_size < 4 || !is_trail(str[pos + 3])) {
            *is_valid = false;
            pos += 3;
        } else {
            *code_point = ((str[pos]     &  0x7) << 18)
                       | ((str[pos + 1] & 0x3F) << 12)
                       | ((str[pos + 2] & 0x3F) << 6)
                       |  (str[pos + 3] & 0x3F);
            *is_valid = true;
            pos += 4;
        }

    } else {
        *is_valid = false;
        pos += 1;
    }

    *cursor = pos;

    return SUCCESS;
}

When I write code for UTF-8, I see "Table 3-7. Well-Formed UTF-8 Byte Sequences" in the Unicode Standard 6.3.

       Code Points    First Byte Second Byte Third Byte Fourth Byte
  U+0000 -   U+007F   00 - 7F
  U+0080 -   U+07FF   C2 - DF    80 - BF
  U+0800 -   U+0FFF   E0         A0 - BF     80 - BF
  U+1000 -   U+CFFF   E1 - EC    80 - BF     80 - BF
  U+D000 -   U+D7FF   ED         80 - 9F     80 - BF
  U+E000 -   U+FFFF   EE - EF    80 - BF     80 - BF
 U+10000 -  U+3FFFF   F0         90 - BF     80 - BF    80 - BF
 U+40000 -  U+FFFFF   F1 - F3    80 - BF     80 - BF    80 - BF
U+100000 - U+10FFFF   F4         80 - 8F     80 - BF    80 - BF
1

You can also use glib which makes your live much easier when dealing with UTF-8. glib reference docs

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